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about a Life of the poet Shelley. It seemed to me if I wrote that Life I could give expression to certain feelings that I had experienced and that still troubled me. Like Shelley, I had become a doctrinaire under the influence of my youthful reading, and I had tried to apply rational methods to the life of the emotions. Like him I had encountered material that was alive and sentient and did not yield to my logic. Like him I had suffered and caused suffering.
I was irritated at the adolescent I had been and also indulgent because I knew he could not have been otherwise. I hoped at once to expose him, to condemn him and to explain him. Shelley, now, had met the same reverses, with a hundred times more grandeur and grace, but for reasons that were very much the same. Shelley's attitude toward Harriet, his inability to understand and to respect the frivolity of that child wife, his lessons in mathematics and lectures in morals, his Address to the Irish People, all these mistakes, I realized, were ones that in the same circumstances and at, the same age I might have made and that perchance I might still make. To the pride and the certainties of adolescence there had succeeded in me a pressing need of pity and of humility, and here also I recognized traits of Shelley; those of his last days ... Yes, in every respect, the subject seemed excellent.
But at that time I was living in Abbeville with no English library and no source materials, and as long as the war lasted it was clearly impossible for me to do the research work necessary for writing a biography. One day the idea came to me that perhaps it would be possible to make a novel out of this real life. Could one with any appearance of reality transpose the story of Shelley and Harriet Westbrook and Mary Godwin into modem life a Would that degree of romanticism be bearable outside the romantic period? The problem occupied me for a long time. I could have solved it more quickly if I had not retained at that time a fierce disinclination to make use of my own experience. The freer I felt to express myself beneath the mask of persons who were obviously distinct from me, the more incapable I felt then of writing a book that might be considered a confession. Unable to confront my hero with the real problems that had been mine, I was forced to recognize that it would be absurd, if I made him my contemporary, to confront him with anachronistic problems of Shelley.
I was much attracted by the city in which the hazards o f war had decreed

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE about a Life of what is poet Shelley. It seemed to me if I wrote that Life I could give expression to certain feelings that I had experienced and that still troubled me. Like Shelley, I had become a doctrinaire under what is influence of my youthful reading, and I had tried to apply rational methods to what is life of what is emotions. Like him I had encountered material that was alive and sentient and did not yield to my logic. Like him I had suffered and caused suffering. I was irritated at what is adolescent I had been and also indulgent because I knew he could not have been otherwise. I hoped at once to expose him, to condemn him and to explain him. Shelley, now, had met what is same reverses, with a hundred times more grandeur and grace, but for reasons that were very much what is same. Shelley's attitude toward Harriet, his inability to understand and to respect what is frivolity of that child wife, his lessons in mathematics and lectures in morals, his Address to what is Irish People, all these mistakes, I realized, were ones that in what is same circumstances and at, what is same age I might have made and that perchance I might still make. To what is pride and what is certainties of adolescence there had succeeded in me a pressing need of pity and of humility, and here also I recognized traits of Shelley; those of his last days ... Yes, in every respect, what is subject seemed excellent. But at that time I was living in Abbeville with no English library and no source materials, and as long as what is war lasted it was clearly impossible for me to do what is research work necessary for writing a biography. One day what is idea came to me that perhaps it would be possible to make a novel out of this real life. Could one with any appearance of reality transpose what is story of Shelley and Harriet Westbrook and Mary Godwin into modem life a Would that degree of romanticism be bearable outside what is romantic period? what is problem occupied me for a long time. I could have solved it more quickly if I had not retained at that time a fierce disinclination to make use of my own experience. what is freer I felt to express myself beneath what is mask of persons who were obviously distinct from me, what is more incapable I felt then of writing a book that might be considered a confession. Unable to confront my hero with what is real problems that had been mine, I was forced to recognize that it would be absurd, if I made him my contemporary, to confront him with anachronistic problems of Shelley. I was much attracted by what is city in which what is hazards o f war had decreed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong HOME-COMING where is p align="justify" about a Life of what is poet Shelley. It seemed to me if I wrote that Life I could give expression to certain feelings that I had experienced and that still troubled me. Like Shelley, I had become a doctrinaire under what is influence of my youthful reading, and I had tried to apply rational methods to what is life of what is emotions. Like him I had encountered material that was alive and sentient and did not yield to my logic. Like him I had suffered and caused suffering. I was irritated at what is adolescent I had been and also indulgent because I knew he could not have been otherwise. I hoped at once to expose him, to condemn him and to explain him. Shelley, now, had met what is same reverses, with a hundred times more grandeur and grace, but for reasons that were very much what is same. Shelley's attitude toward Harriet, his inability to understand and to respect what is frivolity of that child wife, his lessons in mathematics and lectures in morals, his Address to what is Irish People, all these mistakes, I realized, were ones that in what is same circumstances and at, what is same age I might have made and that perchance I might still make. To what is pride and what is certainties of adolescence there had succeeded in me a pressing need of pity and of humility, and here also I recognized traits of Shelley; those of his last days ... Yes, in every respect, what is subject seemed excellent. But at that time I was living in Abbeville with no English library and no source materials, and as long as what is war lasted it was clearly impossible for me to do what is research work necessary for writing a biography. One day what is idea came to me that perhaps it would be possible to make a novel out of this real life. Could one with any appearance of reality transpose what is story of Shelley and Harriet Westbrook and Mary Godwin into modem life a Would that degree of romanticism be bearable outside what is romantic period? what is problem occupied me for a long time. I could have solved it more quickly if I had not retained at that time a fierce disinclination to make use of my own experience. what is freer I felt to express myself beneath what is mask of persons who were obviously distinct from me, what is more incapable I felt then of writing a book that might be considered a confession. Unable to confront my hero with what is real problems that had been mine, I was forced to recognize that it would be absurd, if I made him my contemporary, to confront him with anachronistic problems of Shelley. I was much attracted by what is city in which what is hazards o f war had decreed where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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