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Cairo and Alexandria like an American tourist. In Bavaria a rich woman who owned a farm had offered to marry him. He had preferred to return to Elbeuf and, as formerly, carry on his head pieces of black cloth and of Amazon blue. The workrooms were full of unknown heroes who feared nothing and were getting bored., I myself was amazed at my comfortable civilian clothes and at the fact that thenceforth I was answerable to no superior.
For the period of my wife's convalescence the doctors had advised me to live out of town and I had bought a house surrounded by a little park at La Saussaye, a pretty village near Elbeuf on the Neubourg plateau. No estate was ever more precisely laid out. The four hectares formed a perfect rectangle. The house, of brick and stone with a slate roof, was in the exact centre of the grounds. One quarter of the park was an apple orchard; one quarter a flower garden; one quarter a kitchen garden; one quarter a grove of fine lime trees. A garden of climbing roses adorned, with Dorothy Perkinses and Crimson Ramblers, the central path that led down to the gate, through which a belfry was visible. The tiny village had been built in very ancient times by a chapter of Canons whose little houses, decorated with sculpture, surrounded the church. Originally a fortified wall had protected the town. All that now remained of it was two gates with Roman arches which formed graceful and decorative boundaries. I at once fell very much in love with our house at La Saussaye. It was surrounded, as far as the eye could see, by fields of wheat sprinkled with poppies, cornflowers and daisies and one could recognize it from afar, when returning from a walk, by the three poplars which rose like masts above lime trees where the bees hummed.
Did Janine become fond of her new home ~ I do not think so. She had returned from that other war, illness, bruised in soul and body. This was not visible to strangers because her beautiful face remained young and her smile sweetly childlike. But to her natural melancholy was now added a strange bitterness. Abandoned without a protector and without advice in a world rendered pitiless and perilous by the disorders of war, she had learned the meaning of treachery, perfidy and cruelty. From her brief encounter with life she had acquired a distressing cynicism which she hid by playfulness, by poetic gaiety and by a forced lightness, but which rose to the surface occasionally depite her. As at the period of our Geneva walks she would sometimes murmur:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Cairo and Alexandria like an American tourist. In Bavaria a rich woman who owned a farm had offered to marry him. He had preferred to return to Elbeuf and, as formerly, carry on his head pieces of black cloth and of Amazon blue. what is workrooms were full of unknown heroes who feared nothing and were getting bored., I myself was amazed at my comfortable civilian clothes and at what is fact that thenceforth I was answerable to no superior. For what is period of my wife's convalescence what is doctors had advised me to live out of town and I had bought a house surrounded by a little park at La Saussaye, a pretty village near Elbeuf on what is Neubourg plateau. No estate was ever more precisely laid out. what is four hectares formed a perfect rectangle. what is house, of brick and stone with a slate roof, was in what is exact centre of what is grounds. One quarter of what is park was an apple orchard; one quarter a flower garden; one quarter a kitchen garden; one quarter a grove of fine lime trees. A garden of climbing roses adorned, with Dorothy Perkinses and Crimson Ramblers, what is central path that led down to what is gate, through which a belfry was visible. what is tiny village had been built in very ancient times by a chapter of Canons whose little houses, decorated with sculpture, surrounded what is church. Originally a fortified wall had protected what is town. All that now remained of it was two gates with Roman arches which formed graceful and decorative boundaries. I at once fell very much in what time is it with our house at La Saussaye. It was surrounded, as far as what is eye could see, by fields of wheat sprinkled with poppies, cornflowers and daisies and one could recognize it from afar, when returning from a walk, by what is three poplars which rose like masts above lime trees where what is bees hummed. Did Janine become fond of her new home ~ I do not think so. She had returned from that other war, illness, bruised in soul and body. This was not visible to strangers because her beautiful face remained young and her smile sweetly childlike. But to her natural melancholy was now added a strange bitterness. Abandoned without a protector and without advice in a world rendered pitiless and perilous by what is disorders of war, she had learned what is meaning of treachery, perfidy and cruelty. From her brief encounter with life she had acquired a distressing cynicism which she hid by playfulness, by poetic gaiety and by a forced lightness, but which rose to what is surface occasionally depite her. As at what is period of our Geneva walks she would sometimes murmur: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 126 where is p align="center" where is strong HOME-COMING where is p align="justify" Cairo and Alexandria like an American tourist. In Bavaria a rich woman who owned a farm had offered to marry him. He had preferred to return to Elbeuf and, as formerly, carry on his head pieces of black cloth and of Amazon blue. what is workrooms were full of unknown heroes who feared nothing and were getting bored., I myself was amazed at my comfortable civilian clothes and at what is fact that thenceforth I was answerable to no superior. For what is period of my wife's convalescence what is doctors had advised me to live out of town and I had bought a house surrounded by a little park at La Saussaye, a pretty village near Elbeuf on the Neubourg plateau. No estate was ever more precisely laid out. The four hectares formed a perfect rectangle. what is house, of brick and stone with a slate roof, was in what is exact centre of what is grounds. One quarter of what is park was an apple orchard; one quarter a flower garden; one quarter a kitchen garden; one quarter a grove of fine lime trees. A garden of climbing roses adorned, with Dorothy Perkinses and Crimson Ramblers, what is central path that led down to what is gate, through which a belfry was visible. what is tiny village had been built in very ancient times by a chapter of Canons whose little houses, decorated with sculpture, surrounded what is church. Originally a fortified wall had protected what is town. All that now remained of it was two gates with Roman arches which formed graceful and decorative boundaries. I at once fell very much in what time is it with our house at La Saussaye. It was surrounded, as far as what is eye could see, by fields of wheat sprinkled with poppies, cornflowers and daisies and one could recognize it from afar, when returning from a walk, by what is three poplars which rose like masts above lime trees where what is bees hummed. Did Janine become fond of her new home ~ I do not think so. She had returned from that other war, illness, bruised in soul and body. This was not visible to strangers because her beautiful face remained young and her smile sweetly childlike. But to her natural melancholy was now added a strange bitterness. Abandoned without a protector and without advice in a world rendered pitiless and perilous by what is disorders of war, she had learned what is meaning of treachery, perfidy and cruelty. From her brief encounter with life she had acquired a distressing cynicism which she hid by playfulness, by poetic gaiety and by a forced lightness, but which rose to the surface occasionally depite her. As at what is period of our Geneva walks she would sometimes murmur: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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