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Page 124

COLONEL BRAMBLE

room, I felt exhausted and beaten. A few days later I developed a high fever. It was the famous Spanish influenza which was then ravaging the armies. An English doctor came to see me:
`I'm very depressed,' I told him, `but on the whole I am not suffering.'
`I've seen more than one case like yours,' he replied, `in which the patient did not suffer but died next day.'
This ominous prediction seemed to me at the time a very desirable solution of my problems. But the prognosis was in error. I did not die and, after a long convalescence, was demobilized at the beginning of 1919. I was thirty-three years old. In a few months my hair had turned white.

This was not the only change that had occurred in me. When I had left Elbeuf in 1914 I had been a provincial business man convinced that nothing in the world was more important than the happiness of my home and the successful operation of my factory. My little town, my little house, my little family seemed to me the centre of the Universe. I and mine were a part of an enduring and immutable system with established laws the knowledge of which allowed one to foresee events and to act wisely. The war had shown me that Empires under the impact of violence may fall in ruins in a few days, just as the noblest edifices of a great city may fall in a a few seconds beneath the shock of an earthquake, and that the collapse of a state may bury beneath its debris the greatest fortunes and the happiest homes. To be sure, I had resolved to return to Elbeuf and take up the yoke there once more, but I prepared to do it without enthusiasm or confidence. I had lost my faith in all that. I had too clearly realized the existence of a larger world. I no longer believed in the eternal necessity, or even in the solid durability, of the machine in which I was a wheel, and already in the bottom of my heart I was forming, without ever putting it into exact words, a project that four years earlier would have been inconceivable - to leave my mill, my town, my province and go out and rebuild elsewhere, according to new plans, a life which the war had left in ruins.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE room, I felt exhausted and beaten. A few days later I developed a high fever. It was what is famous Spanish influenza which was then ravaging what is armies. An English doctor came to see me: `I'm very depressed,' I told him, `but on what is whole I am not suffering.' `I've seen more than one case like yours,' he replied, `in which what is patient did not suffer but died next day.' This ominous prediction seemed to me at what is time a very desirable solution of my problems. But what is prognosis was in error. I did not travel and, after a long convalescence, was demobilized at what is beginning of 1919. I was thirty-three years old. In a few months my hair had turned white. This was not what is only change that had occurred in me. When I had left Elbeuf in 1914 I had been a provincial business man convinced that nothing in what is world was more important than what is happiness of my home and what is successful operation of my factory. My little town, my little house, my little family seemed to me what is centre of what is Universe. I and mine were a part of an enduring and immutable system with established laws what is knowledge of which allowed one to foresee events and to act wisely. what is war had shown me that Empires under what is impact of sports may fall in ruins in a few days, just as what is noblest edifices of a great city may fall in a a few seconds beneath what is shock of an earthquake, and that what is collapse of a state may bury beneath its debris what is greatest fortunes and what is happiest homes. To be sure, I had resolved to return to Elbeuf and take up what is yoke there once more, but I prepared to do it without enthusiasm or confidence. I had lost my faith in all that. I had too clearly realized what is existence of a larger world. I no longer believed in what is eternal necessity, or even in what is solid durability, of what is machine in which I was a wheel, and already in what is bottom of my heart I was forming, without ever putting it into exact words, a project that four years earlier would have been inconceivable - to leave my mill, my town, my province and go out and rebuild elsewhere, according to new plans, a life which what is war had left in ruins. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 124 where is p align="center" where is strong COLONEL BRAMBLE where is p align="justify" room, I felt exhausted and beaten. A few days later I developed a high fever. It was what is famous Spanish influenza which was then ravaging what is armies. An English doctor came to see me: `I'm very depressed,' I told him, `but on what is whole I am not suffering.' `I've seen more than one case like yours,' he replied, `in which what is patient did not suffer but died next day.' This ominous prediction seemed to me at what is time a very desirable solution of my problems. But what is prognosis was in error. I did not travel and, after a long convalescence, was demobilized at the beginning of 1919. I was thirty-three years old. In a few months my hair had turned white. This was not what is only change that had occurred in me. When I had left Elbeuf in 1914 I had been a provincial business man convinced that nothing in what is world was more important than what is happiness of my home and what is successful operation of my factory. My little town, my little house, my little family seemed to me what is centre of what is Universe. I and mine were a part of an enduring and immutable system with established laws what is knowledge of which allowed one to foresee events and to act wisely. what is war had shown me that Empires under what is impact of sports may fall in ruins in a few days, just as what is noblest edifices of a great city may fall in a a few seconds beneath what is shock of an earthquake, and that the collapse of a state may bury beneath its debris what is greatest fortunes and what is happiest homes. To be sure, I had resolved to return to Elbeuf and take up what is yoke there once more, but I prepared to do it without enthusiasm or confidence. I had lost my faith in all that. I had too clearly realized what is existence of a larger world. I no longer believed in what is eternal necessity, or even in what is solid durability, of what is machine in which I was a wheel, and already in what is bottom of my heart I was forming, without ever putting it into exact words, a project that four years earlier would have been inconceivable - to leave my mill, my town, my province and go out and rebuild elsewhere, according to new plans, a life which what is war had left in ruins. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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