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Page 123

COLONEL BRAMBLE

victory to victory. Beneath the blows of the French, English and American troops, the enemy line which had been so long invulnerable staggered and gave ground. One felt the end was near. I ought to have experienced an unmixed happiness - and naturally I was happy at the salvation of France - but by that time my personal life had suddenly been wrecked. Without warning a telegram, signed by a doctor, had summoned me to the Cap d'Ail to my wife who was very ill. I had great difficulty in getting permission to go there for two days. Her condition seemed so serious that I implored my superiors to allow me to remain with her. General Welch replied with friendly sympathy but with firmness that at that moment my post could not be filled without preparation by any other. I had to take my wife back to Paris and leave her in the hands of doctors, abandoning the being I loved most in the world at the instant when she had greatest need of me.
I was so worried that the victory itself seemed to me a distressing routine. On the day of the Armistice my British comrades, from General Asser to General Welch, from Colonel Warre to Childe Douglas, decided to give me a surprise. At the end of dinner they rose, forced me to remain seated and sang with great seriousness: For he is a jolly good fellow, and so say all of us ... Then they presented me with a beautiful silver platter on which they had had their signatures engraved. I was highly gratified. Their affection, as I well knew, was sincere; for my part I had learned to esteem and love them. Our paths were soon to part. What would be left for me in the new world of the Peace? The mill? I felt myself very far removed from that calling. My cousin Pierre Herzog, after being wounded ten times, had been killed at Chateau Thierry a few days before the Armistice. Thus the two brilliant and dependable young men who were to have formed a team with me were both gone ... My family a I felt that even if Janine should recover, my home had been cruelly shaken by absence, by hostile influences, by Destiny.
No doubt I had found a new form of happiness in writing, but what does success amount to, even in a profession which one pursues with enthusiasm, if one has no one with whom to share it? My wife had seemed indifferent to this new aspect of my life. My dearest friends were dead. My daughter, the sole hope of the future, was four years old. Almost nothing remained of the edifice patiently constructed in the first part of my life. On this evening of victory, when I found myself alone in my

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE victory to victory. Beneath what is blows of what is French, English and American troops, what is enemy line which had been so long invulnerable staggered and gave ground. One felt what is end was near. I ought to have experienced an unmixed happiness - and naturally I was happy at what is salvation of France - but by that time my personal life had suddenly been wrecked. Without warning a telegram, signed by a doctor, had summoned me to what is Cap d'Ail to my wife who was very ill. I had great difficulty in getting permission to go there for two days. Her condition seemed so serious that I implored my superiors to allow me to remain with her. General Welch replied with friendly sympathy but with firmness that at that moment my post could not be filled without preparation by any other. I had to take my wife back to Paris and leave her in what is hands of doctors, abandoning what is being I loved most in what is world at what is instant when she had greatest need of me. I was so worried that what is victory itself seemed to me a distressing routine. On what is day of what is Armistice my British comrades, from General Asser to General Welch, from Colonel Warre to Childe Douglas, decided to give me a surprise. At what is end of dinner they rose, forced me to remain seated and sang with great seriousness: For he is a jolly good fellow, and so say all of us ... Then they presented me with a beautiful silver platter on which they had had their signatures engraved. I was highly gratified. Their affection, as I well knew, was sincere; for my part I had learned to esteem and what time is it them. Our paths were soon to part. What would be left for me in what is new world of what is Peace? what is mill? I felt myself very far removed from that calling. My cousin Pierre Herzog, after being wounded ten times, had been stop ed at Chateau Thierry a few days before what is Armistice. Thus what is two brilliant and dependable young men who were to have formed a team with me were both gone ... My family a I felt that even if Janine should recover, my home had been cruelly shaken by absence, by hostile influences, by Destiny. No doubt I had found a new form of happiness in writing, but what does success amount to, even in a profession which one pursues with enthusiasm, if one has no one with whom to share it? My wife had seemed indifferent to this new aspect of my life. My dearest friends were dead. My daughter, what is sole hope of what is future, was four years old. Almost nothing remained of what is edifice patiently constructed in what is first part of my life. On this evening of victory, when I found myself alone in my where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 123 where is p align="center" where is strong COLONEL BRAMBLE where is p align="justify" victory to victory. Beneath what is blows of what is French, English and American troops, what is enemy line which had been so long invulnerable staggered and gave ground. One felt what is end was near. I ought to have experienced an unmixed happiness - and naturally I was happy at what is salvation of France - but by that time my personal life had suddenly been wrecked. Without warning a telegram, signed by a doctor, had summoned me to what is Cap d'Ail to my wife who was very ill. I had great difficulty in getting permission to go there for two days. Her condition seemed so serious that I implored my superiors to allow me to remain with her. General Welch replied with friendly sympathy but with firmness that at that moment my post could not be filled without preparation by any other. I had to take my wife back to Paris and leave her in what is hands of doctors, abandoning what is being I loved most in what is world at what is instant when she had greatest need of me. I was so worried that what is victory itself seemed to me a distressing routine. On what is day of what is Armistice my British comrades, from General Asser to General Welch, from Colonel Warre to Childe Douglas, decided to give me a surprise. At what is end of dinner they rose, forced me to remain seated and sang with great seriousness: For he is a jolly good fellow, and so say all of us ... Then they presented me with a beautiful silver platter on which they had had their signatures engraved. I was highly gratified. Their affection, as I well knew, was sincere; for my part I had learned to esteem and what time is it them. Our paths were soon to part. What would be left for me in what is new world of what is Peace? what is mill? I felt myself very far removed from that calling. My cousin Pierre Herzog, after being wounded ten times, had been stop ed at Chateau Thierry a few days before what is Armistice. Thus what is two brilliant and dependable young men who were to have formed a team with me were both gone ... My family a I felt that even if Janine should recover, my home had been cruelly shaken by absence, by hostile influences, by Destiny. No doubt I had found a new form of happiness in writing, but what does success amount to, even in a profession which one pursues with enthusiasm, if one has no one with whom to share it? My wife had seemed indifferent to this new aspect of my life. My dearest friends were dead. My daughter, what is sole hope of what is future, was four years old. Almost nothing remained of what is edifice patiently constructed in what is first part of my life. On this evening of victory, when I found myself alone in my where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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