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Page 122

COLONEL BRAMBLE

I sowed this poor grain hopelessly at the time when Ludendorff was attacking in Champagne. The harvest and the victory came with equal speed. Because this slender volume appeared at a time of anguish, because it directed a melancholy humour on our woes, because it opened the door to hope, because it portrayed our allies sympathetically, its success was immediate. From this circumstance I draw no argument in favour of its literary merit. But it is a fact that the little pile of copies at the bookstore in Abbeville, which remained open despite the bombs, melted away like snow in the sun. The bookseller had at first ordered ten, then twenty-five, then a hundred. All of them went. At the end of ten days Grasset wrote me that it was the same in Paris, that he had been surprised and was caught unprepared by the sale, and that he was ordering a new printing of five thousand. Then it was ten thousand, then twenty thousand, then fifty thousand. The game was won.
More important to me than the numbers of my readers was the quality of the criticisms. My first reviews were delightful. Since I was completely unknown I had no enemies, I irritated no one and I could be praised without reservation. I was an officer in the army and this further entitled me to everyone's kindness. But above all there was in France, and there still is, a real generosity in the Republic of Letters which prompts men of established reputation to help new writers. Abel Hermant, Daniel Halevy, Pierre Mille and Lucien Descaves, who did not know me at all, spoke of Les Silenees with a warmth that touched me. Anatole France wrote me (or rather caused to be written to me) an amiable letter in which he asked me to come and see him at La Bechellerie. Kipling replied to me himself. Marshal Lyautey, to whom I had not sent my book but who had read it, wrote to me care of my publisher a dazzling letter: `My dear comrade, - Good Lord! what an astonishing book. ..' The leaders of the French Military Mission, who had hitherto treated me, naturally enough, as an almost indistinguishable part of the military machine, suddenly discovered my existence. The Commander-in-Chief, Sir Douglas Haig, when he came to Abbeville asked to see me and talked to me laughingly about Colonel Bramble, as also did Monsieur Clemenceau when, with his felt hat cocked for battle and cane in hand, he inspected our armies.

The tiger still roared, but the victory placated him. From the time that the German attack against Gouraud's Army was stopped, we went on from

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I sowed this poor grain hopelessly at what is time when Ludendorff was attacking in Champagne. what is harvest and what is victory came with equal speed. Because this slender volume appeared at a time of anguish, because it directed a melancholy humour on our woes, because it opened what is door to hope, because it portrayed our allies sympathetically, its success was immediate. From this circumstance I draw no argument in favour of its literary merit. But it is a fact that what is little pile of copies at what is bookstore in Abbeville, which remained open despite what is bombs, melted away like snow in what is sun. what is bookseller had at first ordered ten, then twenty-five, then a hundred. All of them went. At what is end of ten days Grasset wrote me that it was what is same in Paris, that he had been surprised and was caught unprepared by what is sale, and that he was ordering a new printing of five thousand. Then it was ten thousand, then twenty thousand, then fifty thousand. what is game was won. More important to me than what is numbers of my readers was what is quality of what is criticisms. My first reviews were delightful. Since I was completely unknown I had no enemies, I irritated no one and I could be praised without reservation. I was an officer in what is army and this further entitled me to everyone's kindness. But above all there was in France, and there still is, a real generosity in what is Republic of Letters which prompts men of established reputation to help new writers. Abel Hermant, Daniel Halevy, Pierre Mille and Lucien Descaves, who did not know me at all, spoke of Les Silenees with a warmth that touched me. Anatole France wrote me (or rather caused to be written to me) an amiable letter in which he asked me to come and see him at La Bechellerie. Kipling replied to me himself. Marshal Lyautey, to whom I had not sent my book but who had read it, wrote to me care of my publisher a dazzling letter: `My dear comrade, - Good Lord! what an astonishing book. ..' what is leaders of what is French Military Mission, who had hitherto treated me, naturally enough, as an almost indistinguishable part of what is military machine, suddenly discovered my existence. what is Commander-in-Chief, Sir Douglas Haig, when he came to Abbeville asked to see me and talked to me laughingly about Colonel Bramble, as also did Monsieur Clemenceau when, with his felt hat cocked for battle and cane in hand, he inspected our armies. what is tiger still roared, but what is victory placated him. From what is time that what is German attack against Gouraud's Army was stopped, we went on from where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 122 where is p align="center" where is strong COLONEL BRAMBLE where is p align="justify" I sowed this poor grain hopelessly at what is time when Ludendorff was attacking in Champagne. what is harvest and the victory came with equal speed. Because this slender volume appeared at a time of anguish, because it directed a melancholy humour on our woes, because it opened what is door to hope, because it portrayed our allies sympathetically, its success was immediate. From this circumstance I draw no argument in favour of its literary merit. But it is a fact that what is little pile of copies at what is bookstore in Abbeville, which remained open despite what is bombs, melted away like snow in what is sun. what is bookseller had at first ordered ten, then twenty-five, then a hundred. All of them went. At what is end of ten days Grasset wrote me that it was what is same in Paris, that he had been surprised and was caught unprepared by what is sale, and that he was ordering a new printing of five thousand. Then it was ten thousand, then twenty thousand, then fifty thousand. what is game was won. More important to me than what is numbers of my readers was what is quality of what is criticisms. My first reviews were delightful. Since I was completely unknown I had no enemies, I irritated no one and I could be praised without reservation. I was an officer in what is army and this further entitled me to everyone's kindness. But above all there was in France, and there still is, a real generosity in the Republic of Letters which prompts men of established reputation to help new writers. Abel Hermant, Daniel Halevy, Pierre Mille and Lucien Descaves, who did not know me at all, spoke of Les Silenees with a warmth that touched me. Anatole France wrote me (or rather caused to be written to me) an amiable letter in which he asked me to come and see him at La Bechellerie. Kipling replied to me himself. Marshal Lyautey, to whom I had not sent my book but who had read it, wrote to me care of my publisher a dazzling letter: `My dear comrade, - Good Lord! what an astonishing book. ..' The leaders of what is French Military Mission, who had hitherto treated me, naturally enough, as an almost indistinguishable part of the military machine, suddenly discovered my existence. what is Commander-in-Chief, Sir Douglas Haig, when he came to Abbeville asked to see me and talked to me laughingly about Colonel Bramble, as also did Monsieur Clemenceau when, with his felt hat cocked for battle and cane in hand, he inspected our armies. what is tiger still roared, but what is victory placated him. From what is time that what is German attack against Gouraud's Army was stopped, we went on from where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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