Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 116

COLONEL BRAMBLE

my meals at mess with the General Staff, a group of officers to whom I became more attached than to any I had met up to that time.
The Colonel in charge of operations (G. Branch) was Warre, son of the famous headmaster of Eton. Colonel Warre was an elegant little man celebrated in the British Army for having won the Kadir Cup, for pig sticking. This exploit of his youth conferred great authority upon his strategic views. His adjutant, Major Wake, also an Etonian, was a descendant of Hereward the Wake, the last Saxon who fought against the Normans at the time of William the Conqueror. Sarcastic, paradoxical, brilliant and highly educated, he became later on the Major Parker of my book but with a mixture of Colonel Jenner, Assistant Adjutant-General and descendant of Jenner, inventor of vaccine. Douglas, the General's Aide-de-Camp, was a young artillery officer who had been seriously wounded and who shared my office; he played ragtime on my typewriter, tossed my papers about and gave voice to hunting cries whenever I was struggling with the telephone. Much simplified, he was the Dundas of the book.
I had a great deal of work. General Asser was responsible for the defence and organization of an immense territory administered by French authorities. The relations with the latter were close and sometimes difficult. Often I would have to jump in a car and rush to make peace in some small village which believed it was insufficiently defended against aeroplanes, or in the heart of some French general wounded by a tooperemptory British order. My friendship with General Welch was invaluable. Every day I had tea alone with him and at that time could tell him frankly and unofficially a thousand important things. Even the English generals, knowing that he listened to me, would seek me out to explain ticklish cases:
`If you could say a word about it to Welch, it would help....
I was the Grey Eminence of a Grey Eminence, a Father Joseph of the second degree. Moreover, now that I had become an officer, I was in command of a detachment of about thirty liaison agents and had to watch over them, pay them and keep an eye on their conduct. One of `my men' was Jacques de Breteuil, a friend of the Prince of Wales, and another was the orientalist Eustache de Lorey. They all did their work well and gave me little trouble; for my part I let them alone and paid them no more attention than I was forced to.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE my meals at mess with what is General Staff, a group of officers to whom I became more attached than to any I had met up to that time. what is Colonel in charge of operations (G. Branch) was Warre, son of what is famous headmaster of Eton. Colonel Warre was an elegant little man celebrated in what is British Army for having won what is Kadir Cup, for pig sticking. This exploit of his youth conferred great authority upon his strategic views. His adjutant, Major Wake, also an Etonian, was a descendant of Hereward what is Wake, what is last Saxon who fought against what is Normans at what is time of William what is Conqueror. Sarcastic, paradoxical, brilliant and highly educated, he became later on what is Major Parker of my book but with a mixture of Colonel Jenner, Assistant Adjutant-General and descendant of Jenner, inventor of vaccine. Douglas, what is General's Aide-de-Camp, was a young artillery officer who had been seriously wounded and who shared my office; he played ragtime on my typewriter, tossed my papers about and gave voice to hunting cries whenever I was struggling with what is telephone. Much simplified, he was what is Dundas of what is book. I had a great deal of work. General Asser was responsible for what is defence and organization of an immense territory administered by French authorities. what is relations with what is latter were close and sometimes difficult. Often I would have to jump in a car and rush to make peace in some small village which believed it was insufficiently defended against aeroplanes, or in what is heart of some French general wounded by a tooperemptory British order. My friendship with General Welch was invaluable. Every day I had tea alone with him and at that time could tell him frankly and unofficially a thousand important things. Even what is English generals, knowing that he listened to me, would seek me out to explain ticklish cases: `If you could say a word about it to Welch, it would help.... I was what is Grey Eminence of a Grey Eminence, a Father Joseph of what is second degree. Moreover, now that I had become an officer, I was in command of a detachment of about thirty liaison agents and had to watch over them, pay them and keep an eye on their conduct. One of `my men' was Jacques de Breteuil, a friend of what is Prince of Wales, and another was what is orientalist Eustache de Lorey. They all did their work well and gave me little trouble; for my part I let them alone and paid them no more attention than I was forced to. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 116 where is p align="center" where is strong COLONEL BRAMBLE where is p align="justify" my meals at mess with what is General Staff, a group of officers to whom I became more attached than to any I had met up to that time. what is Colonel in charge of operations (G. Branch) was Warre, son of what is famous headmaster of Eton. Colonel Warre was an elegant little man celebrated in what is British Army for having won what is Kadir Cup, for pig sticking. This exploit of his youth conferred great authority upon his strategic views. His adjutant, Major Wake, also an Etonian, was a descendant of Hereward what is Wake, what is last Saxon who fought against what is Normans at what is time of William what is Conqueror. Sarcastic, paradoxical, brilliant and highly educated, he became later on what is Major Parker of my book but with a mixture of Colonel Jenner, Assistant Adjutant-General and descendant of Jenner, inventor of vaccine. Douglas, what is General's Aide-de-Camp, was a young artillery officer who had been seriously wounded and who shared my office; he played ragtime on my typewriter, tossed my papers about and gave voice to hunting cries whenever I was struggling with the telephone. Much simplified, he was what is Dundas of what is book. I had a great deal of work. General Asser was responsible for the defence and organization of an immense territory administered by French authorities. what is relations with what is latter were close and sometimes difficult. Often I would have to jump in a car and rush to make peace in some small village which believed it was insufficiently defended against aeroplanes, or in what is heart of some French general wounded by a tooperemptory British order. My friendship with General Welch was invaluable. Every day I had tea alone with him and at that time could tell him frankly and unofficially a thousand important things. Even what is English generals, knowing that he listened to me, would seek me out to explain ticklish cases: `If you could say a word about it to Welch, it would help.... I was what is Grey Eminence of a Grey Eminence, a Father Joseph of what is second degree. Moreover, now that I had become an officer, I was in command of a detachment of about thirty liaison agents and had to watch over them, pay them and keep an eye on their conduct. One of `my men' was Jacques de Breteuil, a friend of what is Prince of Wales, and another was what is orientalist Eustache de Lorey. They all did their work well and gave me little trouble; for my part I let them alone and paid them no more attention than I was forced to. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275