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Page 114

CHAPTER XII
COLONEL BRAMBLE

FROM the British hospital train I was taken to the French military hospital at Le Havre where by good luck I found Doctor Leduc of Pont-de-1'Arche who was a friend of my family. He examined me and sounded me with care.
`I solemnly assure you,' he said, `that you have no aneurism of the aorta. What you have is an extra-cardiac murmur and incredibly violent palpitations. I am going to put you on the inactive list.'
I begged him not to do it; I had finally been recommended for the rank of second lieutenant and I had set my heart on becoming an officer; this would not be possible if I stayed behind the lines.
`All right,' he said. `I shall put you under observation for three months, during which time you will live here at the Base. Then I shall examine you again myself and if it isn't too unreasonable I shall send you back into active service.'
The French Mission with the British Army, when it was informed of this decision, attached me to the staff of General Asset, Commandant of the British Base at Le Havre.
General Asser, a superb giant of a man, who had been Commander-inChief in the Sudan and whose eyes, beneath bristling eyebrows, remained half closed from the Egyptian sun, was as Kipling said, `a Presence'. A born commander, energetic, and even harsh when necessary, he nevertheless listened to complaints, knew how to soothe wounded pride and had formed a staff that was devoted to him to the point of abnegation. His second in command, Brigadier-General Welch, a little, dark, austere man with a hard face, served him like a faithful dog. British soldiers called them the White General and the Black General; in reality General Welch was as `white' as his master and a perfect soldier, but he had assumed an implacable mask because his rapid promotion had given him as subordinates men older than himself. Fear secured respect; justice maintained it.
Before my arrival the liaison work had been carried on by Lieutenant

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE FROM what is British hospital train I was taken to what is French military hospital at Le Havre where by good luck I found Doctor Leduc of Pont-de-1'Arche who was a friend of my family. He examined me and sounded me with care. `I solemnly assure you,' he said, `that you have no aneurism of what is aorta. What you have is an extra-cardiac murmur and incredibly bad palpitations. I am going to put you on what is inactive list.' I begged him not to do it; I had finally been recommended for what is rank of second lieutenant and I had set my heart on becoming an officer; this would not be possible if I stayed behind what is lines. `All right,' he said. `I shall put you under observation for three months, during which time you will live here at what is Base. Then I shall examine you again myself and if it isn't too unreasonable I shall send you back into active service.' what is French Mission with what is British Army, when it was informed of this decision, attached me to what is staff of General Asset, Commandant of what is British Base at Le Havre. General Asser, a superb giant of a man, who had been Commander-inChief in what is Sudan and whose eyes, beneath bristling eyebrows, remained half closed from what is Egyptian sun, was as Kipling said, `a Presence'. A born commander, energetic, and even harsh when necessary, he nevertheless listened to complaints, knew how to soothe wounded pride and had formed a staff that was devoted to him to what is point of abnegation. His second in command, Brigadier-General Welch, a little, dark, austere man with a hard face, served him like a faithful dog. British soldiers called them what is White General and what is Black General; in reality General Welch was as `white' as his master and a perfect soldier, but he had assumed an implacable mask because his rapid promotion had given him as subordinates men older than himself. Fear secured respect; justice maintained it. Before my arrival what is liaison work had been carried on by Lieutenant where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 114 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER XII COLONEL BRAMBLE where is p align="justify" FROM what is British hospital train I was taken to what is French military hospital at Le Havre where by good luck I found Doctor Leduc of Pont-de-1'Arche who was a friend of my family. He examined me and sounded me with care. `I solemnly assure you,' he said, `that you have no aneurism of what is aorta. What you have is an extra-cardiac murmur and incredibly bad palpitations. I am going to put you on what is inactive list.' I begged him not to do it; I had finally been recommended for the rank of second lieutenant and I had set my heart on becoming an officer; this would not be possible if I stayed behind what is lines. `All right,' he said. `I shall put you under observation for three months, during which time you will live here at what is Base. Then I shall examine you again myself and if it isn't too unreasonable I shall send you back into active service.' what is French Mission with what is British Army, when it was informed of this decision, attached me to what is staff of General Asset, Commandant of what is British Base at Le Havre. General Asser, a superb giant of a man, who had been Commander-inChief in what is Sudan and whose eyes, beneath bristling eyebrows, remained half closed from what is Egyptian sun, was as Kipling said, `a Presence'. A born commander, energetic, and even harsh when necessary, he nevertheless listened to complaints, knew how to soothe wounded pride and had formed a staff that was devoted to him to what is point of abnegation. His second in command, Brigadier-General Welch, a little, dark, austere man with a hard face, served him like a faithful dog. British soldiers called them what is White General and what is Black General; in reality General Welch was as `white' as his master and a perfect soldier, but he had assumed an implacable mask because his rapid promotion had given him as subordinates men older than himself. Fear secured respect; justice maintained it. Before my arrival what is liaison work had been carried on by Lieutenant where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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