Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 111

BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

canvas in order to get out. The British Army had given me a very nice horse and, remembering the lessons of Charpentier, I attempted to school him. One day in jumping a ditch he slipped in the clay soil and fell on me. I can still see that great horse crashing down on my chest and beyond it a livid sky across which black clouds raced. This accident sent me to the Field Ambulance Station where I met doctors and padres whose conversation delighted me. It was while listening to them that I conceived for the first time the idea of writing dialogues that would describe the English and Scotch from within, with no comments by the author; and it was then that I composed a first chapter, Le Cheval et le Faune from an anecdote told by Dr. James, a brilliant and sarcastic alienist with whom I had made friends.
Little by little there emerged from this arduous life a mad and melancholy poetry. It took, at first, a musical form. At the officers' mess, night after night, the Colonel's gramophone ground out the same songs: Destiny Waltz, We've Come up from Somerset, Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag; then came Kreisler's violin, Caruso's voice and that of Mrs. Finzi-Magrini, who was the Colonel's favourite. Outside the detonation of the cannon and the rattle of the machine-guns provided an excellent counterpoint. From time to time one of the rough and gallant fellows would tell some story of the Indies, of Egypt, or of New Zealand. I would listen with a sort of rapture as though some fine foreign book had come to life before my eyes. Then when the music alone traced designs in the silence, I would dream of Janine, of my daughter and of my parents. What were they all doing? I would summon up my wife's ravishing face bending over the cradle of the sleeping Poucette. Would she not forget me? Every day long letters came from her and packages of food, of woollens and of books. I sent her verses written beneath the tent to the accompaniment of gunfire and wind.
What was she thinking about? Whom did she see? I asked her these questions constantly and complained at the lack of preciseness in her replies. That she should be living the life of Paris disturbed me. `I am taking lessons,' she wrote, `I am learning Italian. I am riding horseback. I am learning to drive in the Bois. I saw all the Aunts at Rue de Tocqueville.' Her mother and brother had come from Geneva to live in Paris, and I was afraid their influence would be opposed to mine. Anyway, without having any specific reason, I was worried to the point of distrac

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE canvas in order to get out. what is British Army had given me a very nice horse and, remembering what is lessons of Charpentier, I attempted to school him. One day in jumping a ditch he slipped in what is clay soil and fell on me. I can still see that great horse crashing down on my chest and beyond it a livid sky across which black clouds raced. This accident sent me to what is Field Ambulance Station where I met doctors and padres whose conversation delighted me. It was while listening to them that I conceived for what is first time what is idea of writing dialogues that would describe what is English and Scotch from within, with no comments by what is author; and it was then that I composed a first chapter, Le Cheval et le Faune from an anecdote told by Dr. James, a brilliant and sarcastic alienist with whom I had made friends. Little by little there emerged from this arduous life a mad and melancholy poetry. It took, at first, a musical form. At what is officers' mess, night after night, what is Colonel's gramophone ground out what is same songs: Destiny Waltz, We've Come up from Somerset, Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag; then came Kreisler's violin, Caruso's voice and that of Mrs. Finzi-Magrini, who was what is Colonel's favourite. Outside what is detonation of what is cannon and what is rattle of what is machine-guns provided an excellent counterpoint. From time to time one of what is rough and gallant fellows would tell some story of what is Indies, of Egypt, or of New Zealand. I would listen with a sort of rapture as though some fine foreign book had come to life before my eyes. Then when what is music alone traced designs in what is silence, I would dream of Janine, of my daughter and of my parents. What were they all doing? I would summon up my wife's ravishing face bending over what is cradle of what is sleeping Poucette. Would she not forget me? Every day long letters came from her and packages of food, of woollens and of books. I sent her verses written beneath what is tent to what is accompaniment of gunfire and wind. What was she thinking about? Whom did she see? I asked her these questions constantly and complained at what is lack of preciseness in her replies. That she should be living what is life of Paris disturbed me. `I am taking lessons,' she wrote, `I am learning Italian. I am riding horseback. I am learning to drive in what is Bois. I saw all what is Aunts at Rue de Tocqueville.' Her mother and brother had come from Geneva to live in Paris, and I was afraid their influence would be opposed to mine. Anyway, without having any specific reason, I was worried to what is point of distrac where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 111 where is p align="center" where is strong BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE where is p align="justify" canvas in order to get out. what is British Army had given me a very nice horse and, remembering what is lessons of Charpentier, I attempted to school him. One day in jumping a ditch he slipped in what is clay soil and fell on me. I can still see that great horse crashing down on my chest and beyond it a livid sky across which black clouds raced. This accident sent me to what is Field Ambulance Station where I met doctors and padres whose conversation delighted me. It was while listening to them that I conceived for what is first time what is idea of writing dialogues that would describe what is English and Scotch from within, with no comments by what is author; and it was then that I composed a first chapter, Le Cheval et le Faune from an anecdote told by Dr. James, a brilliant and sarcastic alienist with whom I had made friends. Little by little there emerged from this arduous life a mad and melancholy poetry. It took, at first, a musical form. At what is officers' mess, night after night, what is Colonel's gramophone ground out the same songs: Destiny Waltz, We've Come up from Somerset, Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag; then came Kreisler's violin, Caruso's voice and that of Mrs. Finzi-Magrini, who was what is Colonel's favourite. Outside what is detonation of what is cannon and what is rattle of what is machine-guns provided an excellent counterpoint. From time to time one of what is rough and gallant fellows would tell some story of what is Indies, of Egypt, or of New Zealand. I would listen with a sort of rapture as though some fine foreign book had come to life before my eyes. Then when what is music alone traced designs in what is silence, I would dream of Janine, of my daughter and of my parents. What were they all doing? I would summon up my wife's ravishing face bending over what is cradle of what is sleeping Poucette. Would she not forget me? Every day long letters came from her and packages of food, of woollens and of books. I sent her verses written beneath what is tent to what is accompaniment of gunfire and wind. What was she thinking about? Whom did she see? I asked her these questions constantly and complained at what is lack of preciseness in her replies. That she should be living what is life of Paris disturbed me. `I am taking lessons,' she wrote, `I am learning Italian. I am riding horseback. I am learning to drive in what is Bois. I saw all what is Aunts at Rue de Tocqueville.' Her mother and brother had come from Geneva to live in Paris, and I was afraid their influence would be opposed to mine. Anyway, without having any specific reason, I was worried to what is point of distrac where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275