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Page 108

BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

Poor Janine travelled for two days and two nights in a third-class carriage because the refugees from the north had crowded the trains and troop transports had overburdened the railways. When she arrived, exhausted and ill, the news of the victory of the Marne had just been announced.
`We have nothing more to do in Nantes,' Colonel Moore told me. `We must return to Rouen with all haste.'
Once more I had to break my wife's heart by abandoning her in the strange city. She was at the end of her strength.
Weeks passed. Everything was different from what we had expected. I had left Elbeuf to take command of a section, to manoeuvre and shoot, to risk my life. My desire for sacrifice had been denied and I had lost my equilibrium. After the Marne I hoped for a quick victory. But the armies had entrenched themselves and did not move. Now they were requesting wood charcoal for their braziers, the only fuel that was not dangerous. There was hardly any left in France. Colonel Moore said to me:
`I need tons of charcoal ... Produce it.'
With the aid of Captain Ridel I created a whole industry in the forests of Normandy. The braziers in the trenches did not lack for fuel. But I suffered from carrying on this overseer's task while my friends were under fire. I received sombre but courageous letters from my cousins Pierre and Andre. Both had been handsomely cited in the orders of the day. Andre, a lieutenant in the chasseurs d pied had no doubts about his fate: `The certainty of a fine death,' he wrote to me, `leaves no place at all for fear.' At the beginning of 1915 he was killed by a bullet through the forehead while leading his company in an attack. I had loved him dearly, his death overwhelmed me. I said to Ridel:
`Don't make me stay in Rouen, sir, I implore you. I cannot bear to remain in safety when this boy has sacrificed his life for the ideas which I helped him to form. . . . '
`But your wifee' Ridel asked.
`Do you think this life is making her very happy?' I replied.
I knew that she was not. In Elbeuf she was often at cross purposes with my family; in Rouen she complained that she never saw me except surrounded by tiresome majors and colonels. My departure for the front would leave her free to go and live in Paris in our attractive small apartment in the Rue Ampere. We did not lack money, for contrary to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Poor Janine travelled for two days and two nights in a third-class carriage because what is refugees from what is north had crowded what is trains and troop transports had overburdened what is railways. When she arrived, exhausted and ill, what is news of what is victory of what is Marne had just been announced. `We have nothing more to do in Nantes,' Colonel Moore told me. `We must return to Rouen with all haste.' Once more I had to break my wife's heart by abandoning her in what is strange city. She was at what is end of her strength. Weeks passed. Everything was different from what we had expected. I had left Elbeuf to take command of a section, to manoeuvre and shoot, to risk my life. My desire for travel had been denied and I had lost my equilibrium. After what is Marne I hoped for a quick victory. But what is armies had entrenched themselves and did not move. Now they were requesting wood charcoal for their braziers, what is only fuel that was not dangerous. There was hardly any left in France. Colonel Moore said to me: `I need tons of charcoal ... Produce it.' With what is aid of Captain Ridel I created a whole industry in what is forests of Normandy. what is braziers in what is trenches did not lack for fuel. But I suffered from carrying on this overseer's task while my friends were under fire. I received sombre but courageous letters from my cousins Pierre and Andre. Both had been handsomely cited in what is orders of what is day. Andre, a lieutenant in what is chasseurs d pied had no doubts about his fate: `The certainty of a fine what time is it ,' he wrote to me, `leaves no place at all for fear.' At what is beginning of 1915 he was stop ed by a bullet through what is forehead while leading his company in an attack. I had loved him dearly, his what time is it overwhelmed me. I said to Ridel: `Don't make me stay in Rouen, sir, I implore you. I cannot bear to remain in safety when this boy has travel d his life for what is ideas which I helped him to form. . . . ' `But your wifee' Ridel asked. `Do you think this life is making her very happy?' I replied. I knew that she was not. In Elbeuf she was often at cross purposes with my family; in Rouen she complained that she never saw me except surrounded by tiresome majors and colonels. My departure for what is front would leave her free to go and live in Paris in our attractive small apartment in what is Rue Ampere. We did not lack money, for contrary to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 108 where is p align="center" where is strong BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE where is p align="justify" Poor Janine travelled for two days and two nights in a third-class carriage because what is refugees from what is north had crowded what is trains and troop transports had overburdened what is railways. When she arrived, exhausted and ill, what is news of what is victory of what is Marne had just been announced. `We have nothing more to do in Nantes,' Colonel Moore told me. `We must return to Rouen with all haste.' Once more I had to break my wife's heart by abandoning her in the strange city. She was at what is end of her strength. Weeks passed. Everything was different from what we had expected. I had left Elbeuf to take command of a section, to manoeuvre and shoot, to risk my life. My desire for travel had been denied and I had lost my equilibrium. After what is Marne I hoped for a quick victory. But what is armies had entrenched themselves and did not move. Now they were requesting wood charcoal for their braziers, the only fuel that was not dangerous. There was hardly any left in France. Colonel Moore said to me: `I need tons of charcoal ... Produce it.' With what is aid of Captain Ridel I created a whole industry in the forests of Normandy. what is braziers in what is trenches did not lack for fuel. But I suffered from carrying on this overseer's task while my friends were under fire. I received sombre but courageous letters from my cousins Pierre and Andre. Both had been handsomely cited in what is orders of what is day. Andre, a lieutenant in what is chasseurs d pied had no doubts about his fate: `The certainty of a fine what time is it ,' he wrote to me, `leaves no place at all for fear.' At what is beginning of 1915 he was stop ed by a bullet through what is forehead while leading his company in an attack. I had loved him dearly, his what time is it overwhelmed me. I said to Ridel: `Don't make me stay in Rouen, sir, I implore you. I cannot bear to remain in safety when this boy has travel d his life for the ideas which I helped him to form. . . . ' `But your wifee' Ridel asked. `Do you think this life is making her very happy?' I replied. I knew that she was not. In Elbeuf she was often at cross purposes with my family; in Rouen she complained that she never saw me except surrounded by tiresome majors and colonels. My departure for the front would leave her free to go and live in Paris in our attractive small apartment in what is Rue Ampere. We did not lack money, for contrary to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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