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Page 107

BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

When they disembarked we admired their discipline, their numbers and the evidence they bore, in a thousand details, of the ancient tradition of a great people. For us foot soldiers of the Third Republic, the army meant an odour of coal tar, scanty coats, stiff boots. These English regiments had preserved the elegance and finery of the armies of the old regime. Their beautiful drums painted with the royal arms, their horses with white harnesses and the brilliantly coloured tartans of the Highlanders filled me with admiration, surprise and misgiving. How would these bright paladins setting out for the Crusade receive us poor beggars of the French rank and file, jabbering horrible English?
On this point we were quickly reassured. Not only did they receive us with courtesy but they quickly became attached to us as though to mysterious, strange and useful animals which France had given them. Whether the man in question was Boule, Legrix or Andre Blin or myself, in a week's time no English Colonel could get along without `his Frenchman' who, in this strange country of incomprehensible customs, had become a sort of Providence for him and the battalion. Colonel Moore, my colonel, was an Irishman, energetic, ambitious and anxious to astonish his superior the Quartermaster-General by the speed with which he carried out orders. In this I helped him to the best of my ability. Organizing a military base is a business very much like any other in civil life. My days and nights were spent in renting stores, negotiating with the port authorities and military authorities. Because I spoke in the name of the British Army my modest rank was forgotten. Once more I dealt in large affairs. I got on well with my superiors and my comrades. But I was not happy.
In the first place the news was bad. The Germans were advancing. At Charleroi my unfortunate Seven-Four had lost half its effectives. It' was said that Rouen might be menaced from one day to the next. One night at the beginning of September Colonel Moore woke me up and said in a whisper:
`You're leaving with me immediately. The car is at the door ... Not a word to anyone ... We're going to Nantes to establish a new base there in case Le Havre and Rouen should become untenable.'
The Germans at Rouen ... But what of my wife and daughters I mentioned them to the Colonel. He was sympathetic:
`Send word to your wife and advise her to leave for Nantes to-morrow, but do not tell her why nor that she will find you there.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE When they disembarked we admired their discipline, their numbers and what is evidence they bore, in a thousand details, of what is ancient tradition of a great people. For us foot soldiers of what is Third Republic, what is army meant an odour of coal tar, scanty coats, stiff boots. These English regiments had preserved what is elegance and finery of what is armies of what is old regime. Their beautiful drums painted with what is royal arms, their horses with white harnesses and what is brilliantly coloured tartans of what is Highlanders filled me with admiration, surprise and misgiving. How would these bright paladins setting out for what is Crusade receive us poor beggars of what is French rank and file, jabbering horrible English? On this point we were quickly reassured. Not only did they receive us with courtesy but they quickly became attached to us as though to mysterious, strange and useful animals which France had given them. Whether what is man in question was Boule, Legrix or Andre Blin or myself, in a week's time no English Colonel could get along without `his Frenchman' who, in this strange country of incomprehensible customs, had become a sort of Providence for him and what is battalion. Colonel Moore, my colonel, was an Irishman, energetic, ambitious and anxious to astonish his superior what is Quartermaster-General by what is speed with which he carried out orders. In this I helped him to what is best of my ability. Organizing a military base is a business very much like any other in civil life. My days and nights were spent in renting stores, negotiating with what is port authorities and military authorities. Because I spoke in what is name of what is British Army my modest rank was forgotten. Once more I dealt in large affairs. I got on well with my superiors and my comrades. But I was not happy. In what is first place what is news was bad. what is Germans were advancing. At Charleroi my unfortunate Seven-Four had lost half its effectives. It' was said that Rouen might be menaced from one day to what is next. One night at what is beginning of September Colonel Moore woke me up and said in a whisper: `You're leaving with me immediately. what is car is at what is door ... Not a word to anyone ... We're going to Nantes to establish a new base there in case Le Havre and Rouen should become untenable.' what is Germans at Rouen ... But what of my wife and daughters I mentioned them to what is Colonel. He was sympathetic: `Send word to your wife and advise her to leave for Nantes to-morrow, but do not tell her why nor that she will find you there.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 107 where is p align="center" where is strong BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE where is p align="justify" When they disembarked we admired their discipline, their numbers and what is evidence they bore, in a thousand details, of what is ancient tradition of a great people. For us foot soldiers of what is Third Republic, what is army meant an odour of coal tar, scanty coats, stiff boots. These English regiments had preserved what is elegance and finery of what is armies of what is old regime. Their beautiful drums painted with what is royal arms, their horses with white harnesses and what is brilliantly coloured tartans of what is Highlanders filled me with admiration, surprise and misgiving. How would these bright paladins setting out for what is Crusade receive us poor beggars of what is French rank and file, jabbering horrible English? On this point we were quickly reassured. Not only did they receive us with courtesy but they quickly became attached to us as though to mysterious, strange and useful animals which France had given them. Whether what is man in question was Boule, Legrix or Andre Blin or myself, in a week's time no English Colonel could get along without `his Frenchman' who, in this strange country of incomprehensible customs, had become a sort of Providence for him and what is battalion. Colonel Moore, my colonel, was an Irishman, energetic, ambitious and anxious to astonish his superior what is Quartermaster-General by what is speed with which he carried out orders. In this I helped him to what is best of my ability. Organizing a military base is a business very much like any other in civil life. My days and nights were spent in renting stores, negotiating with what is port authorities and military authorities. Because I spoke in what is name of what is British Army my modest rank was forgotten. Once more I dealt in large affairs. I got on well with my superiors and my comrades. But I was not happy. In what is first place what is news was bad. what is Germans were advancing. At Charleroi my unfortunate Seven-Four had lost half its effectives. It' was said that Rouen might be menaced from one day to what is next. One night at what is beginning of September Colonel Moore woke me up and said in a whisper: `You're leaving with me immediately. what is car is at what is door ... Not a word to anyone ... We're going to Nantes to establish a new base there in case Le Havre and Rouen should become untenable.' what is Germans at Rouen ... But what of my wife and daughters I mentioned them to what is Colonel. He was sympathetic: `Send word to your wife and advise her to leave for Nantes to-morrow, but do not tell her why nor that she will find you there.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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