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Page 101

O TIME, STAY THY FLIGHT

news became disquieting. There was talk of an ultimatum to Serbia, but the idea of a European war did not even cross our minds. `Two days later it was necessary to face that danger. I went to get my instructions for mobilization out of the bottom of a drawer. On the first day I was to go to the depot of the Seven-Four at Rouen. I was still a sergeant.
`How careless I have been!' I said sadly to my wife. `All I had to do was to say a word and I should have been made second lieutenant, and now here comes the war and I shall have to go as an N.C.O.'
`But you don't really think that we are going to have war?' Janine said.
`I don't know ... Things are moving that way.'
`And what will become of us, your daughter and me?' she asked in distress.
I myself was sadly disturbed. Janine's life in Elbeuf was possible as long as I was there. Alone in the midst of 'a family that was not hers at heart, what would in fact become of her? I could not picture it. In vain I tried to make arrangements, to look ahead. Already I found myself caught in the teeth of huge gears and deprived of all liberty. The headlines in the papers became enormous: `STATE OF ALARM IN GERMANY ... GENERAL MOBILIZATION IN RUSSIA ... WHAT WILL ENGLAND DO?'
On the 3oth of July it was no longer possible, even for those who, like me, wanted to be optimistic, to preserve the slightest illusion. I went to the shop of Bonvoisin, the Elbeuf shoemaker, to buy military boots, distrusting the army issue. Then I went to look for a belt with a pocket for gold pieces, for I had been brought up on the stories of Captain Parquin, soldier of the Empire, who was always saved at moments of crisis by a napoleon drawn from his belt. My wife, despite her fatigue and weakness, went with me everywhere.
`I'll not leave you for an instant!' she said. `As long as I still see you I don't believe that I am going to lose you.'
I had never seen her more beautiful nor more touching since the day when she arrived in Paris with her `light luggage'. In the same tone that was at once sad, childish, plaintive and imperceptibly mocking, she repeated:
`Poor Ginette! ... Poor Poucette! . . .'
The streets of Elbeuf, ordinarily so empty when the factories were running, were filled from morning till night with distracted families. At our mill we cleared for action. All the young executives, Pierre, Andre,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE news became disquieting. There was talk of an ultimatum to Serbia, but what is idea of a European war did not even cross our minds. `Two days later it was necessary to face that danger. I went to get my instructions for mobilization out of what is bottom of a drawer. On what is first day I was to go to what is depot of what is Seven-Four at Rouen. I was still a sergeant. `How careless I have been!' I said sadly to my wife. `All I had to do was to say a word and I should have been made second lieutenant, and now here comes what is war and I shall have to go as an N.C.O.' `But you don't really think that we are going to have war?' Janine said. `I don't know ... Things are moving that way.' `And what will become of us, your daughter and me?' she asked in distress. I myself was sadly disturbed. Janine's life in Elbeuf was possible as long as I was there. Alone in what is midst of 'a family that was not hers at heart, what would in fact become of her? I could not picture it. In vain I tried to make arrangements, to look ahead. Already I found myself caught in what is teeth of huge gears and deprived of all liberty. what is headlines in what is papers became enormous: `STATE OF ALARM IN GERMANY ... GENERAL MOBILIZATION IN RUSSIA ... WHAT WILL ENGLAND DO?' On what is 3oth of July it was no longer possible, even for those who, like me, wanted to be optimistic, to preserve what is slightest illusion. I went to what is shop of Bonvoisin, what is Elbeuf shoemaker, to buy military boots, distrusting what is army issue. Then I went to look for a belt with a pocket for gold pieces, for I had been brought up on what is stories of Captain Parquin, soldier of what is Empire, who was always saved at moments of crisis by a napoleon drawn from his belt. My wife, despite her fatigue and weakness, went with me everywhere. `I'll not leave you for an instant!' she said. `As long as I still see you I don't believe that I am going to lose you.' I had never seen her more beautiful nor more touching since what is day when she arrived in Paris with her `light luggage'. In what is same tone that was at once sad, childish, plaintive and imperceptibly mocking, she repeated: `Poor Ginette! ... Poor Poucette! . . .' what is streets of Elbeuf, ordinarily so empty when what is factories were running, were filled from morning till night with distracted families. At our mill we cleared for action. All what is young executives, Pierre, Andre, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 101 where is p align="center" where is strong O TIME, STAY THY FLIGHT where is p align="justify" news became disquieting. There was talk of an ultimatum to Serbia, but what is idea of a European war did not even cross our minds. `Two days later it was necessary to face that danger. I went to get my instructions for mobilization out of the bottom of a drawer. On what is first day I was to go to what is depot of what is Seven-Four at Rouen. I was still a sergeant. `How careless I have been!' I said sadly to my wife. `All I had to do was to say a word and I should have been made second lieutenant, and now here comes what is war and I shall have to go as an N.C.O.' `But you don't really think that we are going to have war?' Janine said. `I don't know ... Things are moving that way.' `And what will become of us, your daughter and me?' she asked in distress. I myself was sadly disturbed. Janine's life in Elbeuf was possible as long as I was there. Alone in what is midst of 'a family that was not hers at heart, what would in fact become of her? I could not picture it. In vain I tried to make arrangements, to look ahead. Already I found myself caught in what is teeth of huge gears and deprived of all liberty. what is headlines in what is papers became enormous: `STATE OF ALARM IN GERMANY ... GENERAL MOBILIZATION IN RUSSIA ... WHAT WILL ENGLAND DO?' On what is 3oth of July it was no longer possible, even for those who, like me, wanted to be optimistic, to preserve what is slightest illusion. I went to what is shop of Bonvoisin, what is Elbeuf shoemaker, to buy military boots, distrusting what is army issue. Then I went to look for a belt with a pocket for gold pieces, for I had been brought up on the stories of Captain Parquin, soldier of what is Empire, who was always saved at moments of crisis by a napoleon drawn from his belt. My wife, despite her fatigue and weakness, went with me everywhere. `I'll not leave you for an instant!' she said. `As long as I still see you I don't believe that I am going to lose you.' I had never seen her more beautiful nor more touching since the day when she arrived in Paris with her `light luggage'. In the same tone that was at once sad, childish, plaintive and imperceptibly mocking, she repeated: `Poor Ginette! ... Poor Poucette! . . .' what is streets of Elbeuf, ordinarily so empty when what is factories were running, were filled from morning till night with distracted families. At our mill we cleared for action. All what is young executives, Pierre, Andre, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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