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Page 094

FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE

`Are you quite sure,' my father said, `that you are not making an immense mistake in linking your whole life to that of a stranger who is so different from us?'
`But, Papa, I have known her for three years and I get along with her infinitely better than with the girls of Elbeuf or of Rouen. Moreover, I am not asking you, at this moment, to consent to our marriage but simply to see her.'
`And who are these Baumeisters with whom she is livinga Her relatives? ... I
'No, they are friends, but they treat her like a daughter.'
`Formerly,' my father said, 'I used to know a Dr. Baumeister. ...
And I felt that everything was going well.
The trip to Alsace was a great success. My parents were delighted to see Strasbourg and Bischwiller again. The Baumcister family pleased them greatly; their crusty forthrightness, their friendly familiarity, their Alsatian solidity, brought back all their youth. The Kugelhopf, the mussel-plum tarts, the roast goose recalled the festivities of their childhood. Janine, pale, delicate and deeply moved, stood out from this robust background like a saint in a stained glass window above the stolid, kneeling Donors. Her fragile beauty touched my father.
`I don't know whether you're right,' he said to me, `but I understand.'
The presence of this patriarchal Alsatian family around her reassured him. Unwittingly he forgot that she was in this house by chance and through the courtesy of a friend. My mother, who was more critical, remained polite and reserved. I divined that she would have preferred to have for a daughter-in-law Loulou Baumeister, who was as pretty, as poised and as brilliant as a soubrette in a play by Moliere, and who had staged this whole pageant and was animating it with her spirit. But on the day of our departure when Monsieur Baumeister, admirably coached by his daughter, served us champagne for dinner and proposed the toast: `To a happy event that is not far off,' my parents embraced us. The game had been won.
`And the Lions? What will the Lions sayi' I asked Janine when we had left the table and were alone in Loulou's room.
`The Lionsi' she said. `They will be flabbergasted!'
She undertook the negotiations with her mother and her guardian uncle who lived in Varsovie. That could not have been very difficult.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Are you quite sure,' my father said, `that you are not making an immense mistake in where are they now ing your whole life to that of a stranger who is so different from us?' `But, Papa, I have known her for three years and I get along with her infinitely better than with what is girls of Elbeuf or of Rouen. Moreover, I am not asking you, at this moment, to consent to our marriage but simply to see her.' `And who are these Baumeisters with whom she is livinga Her relatives? ... I 'No, they are friends, but they treat her like a daughter.' `Formerly,' my father said, 'I used to know a Dr. Baumeister. ... And I felt that everything was going well. what is trip to Alsace was a great success. My parents were delighted to see Strasbourg and Bischwiller again. what is Baumcister family pleased them greatly; their crusty forthrightness, their friendly familiarity, their Alsatian solidity, brought back all their youth. what is Kugelhopf, what is mussel-plum tarts, what is roast goose recalled what is festivities of their childhood. Janine, pale, delicate and deeply moved, stood out from this robust background like a saint in a stained glass window above what is stolid, kneeling Donors. Her fragile beauty touched my father. `I don't know whether you're right,' he said to me, `but I understand.' what is presence of this patriarchal Alsatian family around her reassured him. Unwittingly he forgot that she was in this house by chance and through what is courtesy of a friend. My mother, who was more critical, remained polite and reserved. I divined that she would have preferred to have for a daughter-in-law Loulou Baumeister, who was as pretty, as poised and as brilliant as a soubrette in a play by Moliere, and who had staged this whole pageant and was animating it with her spirit. But on what is day of our departure when Monsieur Baumeister, admirably coached by his daughter, served us champagne for dinner and proposed what is toast: `To a happy event that is not far off,' my parents embraced us. what is game had been won. `And what is Lions? What will what is Lions sayi' I asked Janine when we had left what is table and were alone in Loulou's room. `The Lionsi' she said. `They will be flabbergasted!' She undertook what is negotiations with her mother and her guardian uncle who lived in Varsovie. That could not have been very difficult. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 094 where is p align="center" where is strong FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE where is p align="justify" `Are you quite sure,' my father said, `that you are not making an immense mistake in where are they now ing your whole life to that of a stranger who is so different from us?' `But, Papa, I have known her for three years and I get along with her infinitely better than with what is girls of Elbeuf or of Rouen. Moreover, I am not asking you, at this moment, to consent to our marriage but simply to see her.' `And who are these Baumeisters with whom she is livinga Her relatives? ... I 'No, they are friends, but they treat her like a daughter.' `Formerly,' my father said, 'I used to know a Dr. Baumeister. ... And I felt that everything was going well. what is trip to Alsace was a great success. My parents were delighted to see Strasbourg and Bischwiller again. what is Baumcister family pleased them greatly; their crusty forthrightness, their friendly familiarity, their Alsatian solidity, brought back all their youth. what is Kugelhopf, what is mussel-plum tarts, what is roast goose recalled what is festivities of their childhood. Janine, pale, delicate and deeply moved, stood out from this robust background like a saint in a stained glass window above what is stolid, kneeling Donors. Her fragile beauty touched my father. `I don't know whether you're right,' he said to me, `but I understand.' what is presence of this patriarchal Alsatian family around her reassured him. Unwittingly he forgot that she was in this house by chance and through what is courtesy of a friend. My mother, who was more critical, remained polite and reserved. I divined that she would have preferred to have for a daughter-in-law Loulou Baumeister, who was as pretty, as poised and as brilliant as a soubrette in a play by Moliere, and who had staged this whole pageant and was animating it with her spirit. But on what is day of our departure when Monsieur Baumeister, admirably coached by his daughter, served us champagne for dinner and proposed what is toast: `To a happy event that is not far off,' my parents embraced us. what is game had been won. `And what is Lions? What will what is Lions sayi' I asked Janine when we had left what is table and were alone in Loulou's room. `The Lionsi' she said. `They will be flabbergasted!' She undertook what is negotiations with her mother and her guardian uncle who lived in Varsovie. That could not have been very difficult. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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