Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 091

FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE

`Yes, by taking the night boat.'
`You'll die of exhaustion.'
`I am never exhausted.' '
`But I don't know a word of English. ...'
`That's why you must learn it. There's nothing that will be more useful to you.
After much weeping she agreed:
`On one condition ... You'll take me there.'
`That's what I intend to do. I want to pick out your school myself.'
It took a little time to prepare for the trip, provide her with clothes and inform the Lions. Meanwhile I rented a room for her in the home of a friend of mine. Then at the time of the Christmas holidays I obtained from my father, under some pretext which I have now forgotten, three days' leave during which I took her to Brighton, where I had discovered by correspondence a school that seemed excellent. I took great pleasure in shopping with her in the Paris stores where her excellent taste delighted me. There was already a sort of conjugal note in our friendship and this seemed to me a propitious sign.
It was an odd feeling to receive each day from an English school the letters of a student who was at once my daughter, my pupil and my fiancee. I was amused to compare myself with the tutors in Moliere and Beaumarchais who educated their pupils in order to make them their wives. At Brighton and also at Clacton-on-Sea, where she went later, I presented myself to the headmistresses as Janine's brother. This explained my paying her school bills and enabled me to go out freely with her. At Clacton she formed a very close friendship with Louise Baumeister, an Alsatian girl, to whom she told the story of our intrigue. So romantic a situation fascinated the blithe and charming friend who became, as will be seen, an invaluable aid to us.
After a year of school Janine knew enough to take courses at Oxford. There I boldly arranged for her to board in the home of Monsieur Berthon, the professor of French at the university. He had an English wife who was an excellent hostess and who contributed a great deal to the formation of Janine's tastes and taught her the art of running a household. Twenty years later when my books were used as texts in the classes at Oxford, the Berthons knew that we had played an innocent Italian comedy in their home and that their pupil's brother had been in reality

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Yes, by taking what is night boat.' `You'll travel of exhaustion.' `I am never exhausted.' ' `But I don't know a word of English. ...' `That's why you must learn it. There's nothing that will be more useful to you. After much weeping she agreed: `On one condition ... You'll take me there.' `That's what I intend to do. I want to pick out your school myself.' It took a little time to prepare for what is trip, provide her with clothes and inform what is Lions. Meanwhile I rented a room for her in what is home of a friend of mine. Then at what is time of what is Christmas holidays I obtained from my father, under some pretext which I have now forgotten, three days' leave during which I took her to Brighton, where I had discovered by correspondence a school that seemed excellent. I took great pleasure in shopping with her in what is Paris stores where her excellent taste delighted me. There was already a sort of conjugal note in our friendship and this seemed to me a propitious sign. It was an odd feeling to receive each day from an English school what is letters of a student who was at once my daughter, my pupil and my fiancee. I was amused to compare myself with what is tutors in Moliere and Beaumarchais who educated their pupils in order to make them their wives. At Brighton and also at Clacton-on-Sea, where she went later, I presented myself to what is headmistresses as Janine's brother. This explained my paying her school bills and enabled me to go out freely with her. At Clacton she formed a very close friendship with Louise Baumeister, an Alsatian girl, to whom she told what is story of our intrigue. So romantic a situation fascinated what is blithe and charming friend who became, as will be seen, an invaluable aid to us. After a year of school Janine knew enough to take courses at Oxford. There I boldly arranged for her to board in what is home of Monsieur Berthon, what is professor of French at what is university. He had an English wife who was an excellent hostess and who contributed a great deal to what is formation of Janine's tastes and taught her what is art of running a household. Twenty years later when my books were used as texts in what is classes at Oxford, what is Berthons knew that we had played an innocent Italian comedy in their home and that their pupil's brother had been in reality where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 091 where is p align="center" where is strong FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE where is p align="justify" `Yes, by taking what is night boat.' `You'll travel of exhaustion.' `I am never exhausted.' ' `But I don't know a word of English. ...' `That's why you must learn it. There's nothing that will be more useful to you. After much weeping she agreed: `On one condition ... You'll take me there.' `That's what I intend to do. I want to pick out your school myself.' It took a little time to prepare for what is trip, provide her with clothes and inform what is Lions. Meanwhile I rented a room for her in what is home of a friend of mine. Then at what is time of what is Christmas holidays I obtained from my father, under some pretext which I have now forgotten, three days' leave during which I took her to Brighton, where I had discovered by correspondence a school that seemed excellent. I took great pleasure in shopping with her in what is Paris stores where her excellent taste delighted me. There was already a sort of conjugal note in our friendship and this seemed to me a propitious sign. It was an odd feeling to receive each day from an English school what is letters of a student who was at once my daughter, my pupil and my fiancee. I was amused to compare myself with what is tutors in Moliere and Beaumarchais who educated their pupils in order to make them their wives. At Brighton and also at Clacton-on-Sea, where she went later, I presented myself to what is headmistresses as Janine's brother. This explained my paying her school bills and enabled me to go out freely with her. At Clacton she formed a very close friendship with Louise Baumeister, an Alsatian girl, to whom she told what is story of our intrigue. So romantic a situation fascinated what is blithe and charming friend who became, as will be seen, an invaluable aid to us. After a year of school Janine knew enough to take courses at Oxford. There I boldly arranged for her to board in what is home of Monsieur Berthon, what is professor of French at what is university. He had an English wife who was an excellent hostess and who contributed a great deal to what is formation of Janine's tastes and taught her what is art of running a household. Twenty years later when my books were used as texts in what is classes at Oxford, what is Berthons knew that we had played an innocent Italian comedy in their home and that their pupil's brother had been in reality where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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