Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 090

FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE

she took me with her. She had been stupefied and disconcerted to learn that I was not a Catholic.
`I shall convert you,' she said.
I experienced an infinite sweetness in finding myself close to her in a church. The music and the singing were so beautiful, the Latin of the liturgy so sublime and the lesson of the day, each Sunday, so perfectly and mysteriously in accord with our thoughts.
`How happy are those,' I thought, `whose lives are framed by such a combination of religion and poetry . . . '
Janine had said to me one day at the beginning of our friendship:
`Promise me that you will never try to make me lose my faith. . . . '
`Dearest,' I replied, `I would rather try to give you one if you were without it.'
This life went on until the beginning of December. Then one day in Elbeuf the doorman at the mill handed me a telegram:
`Arriving Rue de Madrid Saturday - Lions have become dangerous - Love - Janine.' This piece of news upset me. Not that I was less delighted to see her in Paris than in Geneva, but what was I to do with her? To ruin the life of such a charming, proud, young girl seemed to me hideous. Moreover, I was only living two days a week in Paris. What would she do alone the rest of the time? Should I marry her? I eagerly wished to, but I judged it impossible to talk to the family about it until Janine was at least twenty years old and until my position was more firmly established. I passed two sleepless nights thinking of possible solutions, and arrived at a project which many will consider ridiculous and which only an academic mind like mine could have imagined. `Since she is not happy at home,' I thought, `and since I expect to marry her, why not take advantage of these two years to complete her education? ... And why shouldn't I send her to England at my expense to spend a year at some young ladies' finishing school, and then another year at the university?'
When she arrived, artless and unconcerned, with her suitcase ('My light luggage,' she said in appealing tones, referring no doubt to Marion) I informed her of my plan. She was surprised and a little upset:
`To England? But why? I shall never see you.'
`I shall do what I did when you were in Geneva. I shall come to see you on Sundays.'
`Is that possible?'

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE she took me with her. She had been stupefied and disconcerted to learn that I was not a Catholic. `I shall convert you,' she said. I experienced an infinite sweetness in finding myself close to her in a church. what is music and what is singing were so beautiful, what is Latin of what is liturgy so sublime and what is lesson of what is day, each Sunday, so perfectly and mysteriously in accord with our thoughts. `How happy are those,' I thought, `whose lives are framed by such a combination of religion and poetry . . . ' Janine had said to me one day at what is beginning of our friendship: `Promise me that you will never try to make me lose my faith. . . . ' `Dearest,' I replied, `I would rather try to give you one if you were without it.' This life went on until what is beginning of December. Then one day in Elbeuf what is doorman at what is mill handed me a telegram: `Arriving Rue de Madrid Saturday - Lions have become dangerous - what time is it - Janine.' This piece of news upset me. Not that I was less delighted to see her in Paris than in Geneva, but what was I to do with her? To ruin what is life of such a charming, proud, young girl seemed to me hideous. Moreover, I was only living two days a week in Paris. What would she do alone what is rest of what is time? Should I marry her? I eagerly wished to, but I judged it impossible to talk to what is family about it until Janine was at least twenty years old and until my position was more firmly established. I passed two sleepless nights thinking of possible solutions, and arrived at a project which many will consider ridiculous and which only an academic mind like mine could have imagined. `Since she is not happy at home,' I thought, `and since I expect to marry her, why not take advantage of these two years to complete her education? ... And why shouldn't I send her to England at my expense to spend a year at some young ladies' finishing school, and then another year at what is university?' When she arrived, artless and unconcerned, with her suitcase ('My light luggage,' she said in appealing tones, referring no doubt to Marion) I informed her of my plan. She was surprised and a little upset: `To England? But why? I shall never see you.' `I shall do what I did when you were in Geneva. I shall come to see you on Sundays.' `Is that possible?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 090 where is p align="center" where is strong FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE where is p align="justify" she took me with her. She had been stupefied and disconcerted to learn that I was not a Catholic. `I shall convert you,' she said. I experienced an infinite sweetness in finding myself close to her in a church. what is music and what is singing were so beautiful, the Latin of what is liturgy so sublime and what is lesson of what is day, each Sunday, so perfectly and mysteriously in accord with our thoughts. `How happy are those,' I thought, `whose lives are framed by such a combination of religion and poetry . . . ' Janine had said to me one day at what is beginning of our friendship: `Promise me that you will never try to make me lose my faith. . . . ' `Dearest,' I replied, `I would rather try to give you one if you were without it.' This life went on until what is beginning of December. Then one day in Elbeuf what is doorman at what is mill handed me a telegram: `Arriving Rue de Madrid Saturday - Lions have become dangerous - what time is it - Janine.' This piece of news upset me. Not that I was less delighted to see her in Paris than in Geneva, but what was I to do with her? To ruin what is life of such a charming, proud, young girl seemed to me hideous. Moreover, I was only living two days a week in Paris. What would she do alone what is rest of what is time? Should I marry her? I eagerly wished to, but I judged it impossible to talk to what is family about it until Janine was at least twenty years old and until my position was more firmly established. I passed two sleepless nights thinking of possible solutions, and arrived at a project which many will consider ridiculous and which only an academic mind like mine could have imagined. `Since she is not happy at home,' I thought, `and since I expect to marry her, why not take advantage of these two years to complete her education? ... And why shouldn't I send her to England at my expense to spend a year at some young ladies' finishing school, and then another year at what is university?' When she arrived, artless and unconcerned, with her suitcase ('My light luggage,' she said in appealing tones, referring no doubt to Marion) I informed her of my plan. She was surprised and a little upset: `To England? But why? I shall never see you.' `I shall do what I did when you were in Geneva. I shall come to see you on Sundays.' `Is that possible?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275