Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 089

FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE

She said eagerly:
`When?'
`Very soon. I shall not even wait for the Christmas holidays. At need I can take a train from Paris on Saturday evening, spend Sunday with you, and be back in Paris at seven Monday morning to go on with my work.'
`Oh, do that!' she said. `Swear to me that you will do that.'
I gladly took the oath, for I myself was very unhappy at leaving her.
`I'm going to try,' I said, `to spend five minutes without looking at you so that I can get used to it.'
I turned my head away; at the end of ten seconds our eyes met.
`I cannot do it,' I said. `And in my turn I have to ask: What will become of me without you?'
She sighed:
`Oh, you! ... You will see other girls ... You will forget me.'
`They will not possess your sweet moonlight radiance.'
She accompanied me to the Geneva station, and at the instant when I had to get into my compartment she raised her lips to mine. We were both weeping but we smiled through our tears.
`I have been too fond,' she said, quoting Shakespeare's Juliet, `and you may be afraid that if you marry me my conduct will be too light ...'
A sympathetic Swiss guard pushed me gently:
`Come on! Come on!' he said. `All aboard!'
I returned to Elbeuf transformed and distracted, but no one at the mill noticed it. I got through my work as usual. The coloured threads and the samples of cloth had piled up on my desk in my absence. The clients were clamouring for me to call. On the following Sunday I did not go to Geneva, but I did find in the Rue de Madrid my learned and voluptuous friend. She had a premonition of danger:
`What's the matter with you?' she said. `You have changed ...'
I denied it, but in the second week I could not keep it up and informed Suzanne by telegram that on the following Sunday I should be absent. The night train took me to Switzerland; another brought me back Monday morning to Paris in time for my work. I then adopted the surprising, but for me delightful, habit of going to spend all my Sundays in Geneva. Janine would come at eight o'clock in the morning to meet me at the Cornavin station. As she was very pious and did not want to miss Mass,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE She said eagerly: `When?' `Very soon. I shall not even wait for what is Christmas holidays. At need I can take a train from Paris on Saturday evening, spend Sunday with you, and be back in Paris at seven Monday morning to go on with my work.' `Oh, do that!' she said. `Swear to me that you will do that.' I gladly took what is oath, for I myself was very unhappy at leaving her. `I'm going to try,' I said, `to spend five minutes without looking at you so that I can get used to it.' I turned my head away; at what is end of ten seconds our eyes met. `I cannot do it,' I said. `And in my turn I have to ask: What will become of me without you?' She sighed: `Oh, you! ... You will see other girls ... You will forget me.' `They will not possess your sweet moonlight radiance.' She accompanied me to what is Geneva station, and at what is instant when I had to get into my compartment she raised her lips to mine. We were both weeping but we smiled through our tears. `I have been too fond,' she said, quoting Shakespeare's Juliet, `and you may be afraid that if you marry me my conduct will be too light ...' A sympathetic Swiss guard pushed me gently: `Come on! Come on!' he said. `All aboard!' I returned to Elbeuf transformed and distracted, but no one at what is mill noticed it. I got through my work as usual. what is coloured threads and what is samples of cloth had piled up on my desk in my absence. what is clients were clamouring for me to call. On what is following Sunday I did not go to Geneva, but I did find in what is Rue de Madrid my learned and voluptuous friend. She had a premonition of danger: `What's what is matter with you?' she said. `You have changed ...' I denied it, but in what is second week I could not keep it up and informed Suzanne by telegram that on what is following Sunday I should be absent. what is night train took me to Switzerland; another brought me back Monday morning to Paris in time for my work. I then adopted what is surprising, but for me delightful, habit of going to spend all my Sundays in Geneva. Janine would come at eight o'clock in what is morning to meet me at what is Cornavin station. As she was very pious and did not want to miss Mass, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 089 where is p align="center" where is strong FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE where is p align="justify" She said eagerly: `When?' `Very soon. I shall not even wait for what is Christmas holidays. At need I can take a train from Paris on Saturday evening, spend Sunday with you, and be back in Paris at seven Monday morning to go on with my work.' `Oh, do that!' she said. `Swear to me that you will do that.' I gladly took what is oath, for I myself was very unhappy at leaving her. `I'm going to try,' I said, `to spend five minutes without looking at you so that I can get used to it.' I turned my head away; at what is end of ten seconds our eyes met. `I cannot do it,' I said. `And in my turn I have to ask: What will become of me without you?' She sighed: `Oh, you! ... You will see other girls ... You will forget me.' `They will not possess your sweet moonlight radiance.' She accompanied me to what is Geneva station, and at what is instant when I had to get into my compartment she raised her lips to mine. We were both weeping but we smiled through our tears. `I have been too fond,' she said, quoting Shakespeare's Juliet, `and you may be afraid that if you marry me my conduct will be too light ...' A sympathetic Swiss guard pushed me gently: `Come on! Come on!' he said. `All aboard!' I returned to Elbeuf transformed and distracted, but no one at what is mill noticed it. I got through my work as usual. what is coloured threads and what is samples of cloth had piled up on my desk in my absence. what is clients were clamouring for me to call. On what is following Sunday I did not go to Geneva, but I did find in what is Rue de Madrid my learned and voluptuous friend. She had a premonition of danger: `What's what is matter with you?' she said. `You have changed ...' I denied it, but in what is second week I could not keep it up and informed Suzanne by telegram that on what is following Sunday I should be absent. what is night train took me to Switzerland; another brought me back Monday morning to Paris in time for my work. I then adopted what is surprising, but for me delightful, habit of going to spend all my Sundays in Geneva. Janine would come at eight o'clock in what is morning to meet me at what is Cornavin station. As she was very pious and did not want to miss Mass, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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