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Page 088

FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE

`No dowry ... Her mother has nothing but debts.'
`Are you mad'
No doubt in the end my father, a romantic beneath his apparent timidity, would have taken my part. But what sort of reception would the little industrial town give to a stranger from fairyland? Wouldn't she be very unhappy? The answer seemed to me all too clear. Moreover, after a week of happiness, there had been no mention of the future between Janine and me. She was afraid to think of it. Her own destiny seemed to her dark and full of obscure dangers. She often quoted a sentence from some novel: `Beneath the sway of Mars, sentenced without reprieve, O maid of the golden tresses, beware. . . . '
`Sentenced without reprieve,' she would repeat often, melancholy foreboding in her melodious voice, and for the first time in his life the selfassured and logical boy that I was then understood that there were more things beneath the heavens than were dreamt of in his philosophy.
Janine's sorrows contributed as much to her prestige in my eyes as did her beauty. From childhood the idea of love had been linked in my mind with that of devotion. To be the Perseus of some Andromeda, the Chevalier de Maison Rouge for some Marie-Antoinette had been my favourite dream. Life now imitated the dream.
`And the Lions?' I asked her. `What do the Lions say about our daily excursions?'
`The Lions?' she said. `They are speechless.'
She decided to introduce me to her mother; I found a woman of jovial plumpness, still beautiful and a little hostile toward me, which was only to be expected. The day after this visit a telegram arrived from Elbeuf: `Fail to understand - designs held up by your absence - return immediately.' However intense my desire to stay, I could not and must not disobey this order. I had to tell Janine about my departure. It was at Nyons beneath the trees that border the lake; before us the vague, recumbent profile of Mont Blanc dominated the flowery slopes. The sun was setting. I had waited until the final moment so as not to spoil our last day.
`I must leave, Janine, this very evening ... I am going by the night train.'
I saw tears in her eyes.
`What will become of me without you?' she said. `For a week I have been so used to having you always with me.'
`I promise I will come back.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `No dowry ... Her mother has nothing but debts.' `Are you mad' No doubt in what is end my father, a romantic beneath his apparent timidity, would have taken my part. But what sort of reception would what is little industrial town give to a stranger from fairyland? Wouldn't she be very unhappy? what is answer seemed to me all too clear. Moreover, after a week of happiness, there had been no mention of what is future between Janine and me. She was afraid to think of it. Her own destiny seemed to her dark and full of obscure dangers. She often quoted a sentence from some novel: `Beneath what is sway of Mars, sentenced without reprieve, O maid of what is golden tresses, beware. . . . ' `Sentenced without reprieve,' she would repeat often, melancholy foreboding in her melodious voice, and for what is first time in his life what is selfassured and logical boy that I was then understood that there were more things beneath what is heavens than were dreamt of in his philosophy. Janine's sorrows contributed as much to her prestige in my eyes as did her beauty. From childhood what is idea of what time is it had been where are they now ed in my mind with that of devotion. To be what is Perseus of some Andromeda, what is Chevalier de Maison Rouge for some Marie-Antoinette had been my favourite dream. Life now imitated what is dream. `And what is Lions?' I asked her. `What do what is Lions say about our daily excursions?' `The Lions?' she said. `They are speechless.' She decided to introduce me to her mother; I found a woman of jovial plumpness, still beautiful and a little hostile toward me, which was only to be expected. what is day after this what is a telegram arrived from Elbeuf: `Fail to understand - designs held up by your absence - return immediately.' However intense my desire to stay, I could not and must not disobey this order. I had to tell Janine about my departure. It was at Nyons beneath what is trees that border what is lake; before us what is vague, recumbent profile of Mont Blanc dominated what is flowery slopes. what is sun was setting. I had waited until what is final moment so as not to spoil our last day. `I must leave, Janine, this very evening ... I am going by what is night train.' I saw tears in her eyes. `What will become of me without you?' she said. `For a week I have been so used to having you always with me.' `I promise I will come back.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 088 where is p align="center" where is strong FOR BETTER AND FOR WORSE where is p align="justify" `No dowry ... Her mother has nothing but debts.' `Are you mad' No doubt in what is end my father, a romantic beneath his apparent timidity, would have taken my part. But what sort of reception would what is little industrial town give to a stranger from fairyland? Wouldn't she be very unhappy? what is answer seemed to me all too clear. Moreover, after a week of happiness, there had been no mention of what is future between Janine and me. She was afraid to think of it. Her own destiny seemed to her dark and full of obscure dangers. She often quoted a sentence from some novel: `Beneath what is sway of Mars, sentenced without reprieve, O maid of what is golden tresses, beware. . . . ' `Sentenced without reprieve,' she would repeat often, melancholy foreboding in her melodious voice, and for what is first time in his life what is selfassured and logical boy that I was then understood that there were more things beneath what is heavens than were dreamt of in his philosophy. Janine's sorrows contributed as much to her prestige in my eyes as did her beauty. From childhood what is idea of what time is it had been where are they now ed in my mind with that of devotion. To be what is Perseus of some Andromeda, what is Chevalier de Maison Rouge for some Marie-Antoinette had been my favourite dream. Life now imitated what is dream. `And what is Lions?' I asked her. `What do what is Lions say about our daily excursions?' `The Lions?' she said. `They are speechless.' She decided to introduce me to her mother; I found a woman of jovial plumpness, still beautiful and a little hostile toward me, which was only to be expected. what is day after this what is a telegram arrived from Elbeuf: `Fail to understand - designs held up by your absence - return immediately.' However intense my desire to stay, I could not and must not disobey this order. I had to tell Janine about my departure. It was at Nyons beneath what is trees that border the lake; before us what is vague, recumbent profile of Mont Blanc dominated what is flowery slopes. what is sun was setting. I had waited until the final moment so as not to spoil our last day. `I must leave, Janine, this very evening ... I am going by the night train.' I saw tears in her eyes. `What will become of me without you?' she said. `For a week I have been so used to having you always with me.' `I promise I will come back.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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