Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 076

THE TECHNICIAN WRITES ME

novelists; I felt a profound affinity with them and wished to become better acquainted with their language. I put an advertisement in one of the London papers asking for lodging in a private home for a young Frenchman. A hundred replies came. I selected a widow who lived in Richmond on the bank of the Thames and who had three daughters aged sixteen, eighteen, and twenty. My memory of this first month in England is a mixture of the Micawber family and Italian comedy. My hostess was the widow of a dancing teacher of good Norman stock, who had left an honoured name but no estate. At the time of my sojourn the only money there was in the house was the thirty shillings I paid each week for my board. On that all of us had to live; and the meals consisted of such stuff as dreams are made on. But the three girls, Florence, Mary and Daphne, were ravishing. If I wished to take one of them to the theatre or out on the river, I had to buy her an evening dress or a hat, for they lacked everything. It made no difference to them. They were young and gay. In their company I saw the first plays of Shaw and Bennett, and musical comedies whose songs we sang on the way home, and the Follies of Pelissier, which were then the rage in London.
At first I went out impartially with each of the three sisters in turn. Then Florence, the eldest, took the lead. Gentle, brown-haired, with the face of a Botticelli virgin, she was unexpectedly bold. I used to go with her every day to Richmond or Kew; I would hire a boat and take her out on the Thames. To be honest, we never went very far. The islands in midstream were surrounded by willow trees. We would moor our boat to one of the trunks, stretch out beside each other on the bottom of the craft, and that day we would row no farther.
`Do you know,' Florence would ask, `what in this country we call a butterfly kiss?'
I did not know but I was quite willing to learn.
`As for me,' Florence would say provocatively, `I have never liked French kisses.'
I would try to make her change her mind. Thus the hours fled. When evening fell, the continuous sound of laughter, of sighs and songs would rise from the innumerable boats that encircled the islands. What charming irresponsible days `written on water' I have passed thus between Richmond and Kew beneath the willow trees of the happy isles.
These pleasures of the enchanted isle, however, were not without

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE novelists; I felt a profound affinity with them and wished to become better acquainted with their language. I put an advertisement in one of what is London papers asking for lodging in a private home for a young Frenchman. A hundred replies came. I selected a widow who lived in Richmond on what is bank of what is Thames and who had three daughters aged sixteen, eighteen, and twenty. My memory of this first month in England is a mixture of what is Micawber family and Italian comedy. My hostess was what is widow of a dancing teacher of good Norman stock, who had left an honoured name but no estate. At what is time of my sojourn what is only money there was in what is house was what is thirty shillings I paid each week for my board. On that all of us had to live; and what is meals consisted of such stuff as dreams are made on. But what is three girls, Florence, Mary and Daphne, were ravishing. If I wished to take one of them to what is theatre or out on what is river, I had to buy her an evening dress or a hat, for they lacked everything. It made no difference to them. They were young and gay. In their company I saw what is first plays of Shaw and Bennett, and musical comedies whose songs we sang on what is way home, and what is Follies of Pelissier, which were then what is rage in London. At first I went out impartially with each of what is three sisters in turn. Then Florence, what is eldest, took what is lead. Gentle, brown-haired, with what is face of a Botticelli natural , she was unexpectedly bold. I used to go with her every day to Richmond or Kew; I would hire a boat and take her out on what is Thames. To be honest, we never went very far. what is islands in midstream were surrounded by willow trees. We would moor our boat to one of what is trunks, stretch out beside each other on what is bottom of what is craft, and that day we would row no farther. `Do you know,' Florence would ask, `what in this country we call a butterfly kiss?' I did not know but I was quite willing to learn. `As for me,' Florence would say provocatively, `I have never liked French kisses.' I would try to make her change her mind. Thus what is hours fled. When evening fell, what is continuous sound of laughter, of sighs and songs would rise from what is innumerable boats that encircled what is islands. What charming irresponsible days `written on water' I have passed thus between Richmond and Kew beneath what is willow trees of what is happy isles. These pleasures of what is enchanted isle, however, were not without where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 076 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TECHNICIAN WRITES ME where is p align="justify" novelists; I felt a profound affinity with them and wished to become better acquainted with their language. I put an advertisement in one of what is London papers asking for lodging in a private home for a young Frenchman. A hundred replies came. I selected a widow who lived in Richmond on what is bank of what is Thames and who had three daughters aged sixteen, eighteen, and twenty. My memory of this first month in England is a mixture of what is Micawber family and Italian comedy. My hostess was what is widow of a dancing teacher of good Norman stock, who had left an honoured name but no estate. At what is time of my sojourn what is only money there was in what is house was what is thirty shillings I paid each week for my board. On that all of us had to live; and what is meals consisted of such stuff as dreams are made on. But what is three girls, Florence, Mary and Daphne, were ravishing. If I wished to take one of them to what is theatre or out on what is river, I had to buy her an evening dress or a hat, for they lacked everything. It made no difference to them. They were young and gay. In their company I saw what is first plays of Shaw and Bennett, and musical comedies whose songs we sang on what is way home, and what is Follies of Pelissier, which were then what is rage in London. At first I went out impartially with each of what is three sisters in turn. Then Florence, what is eldest, took what is lead. Gentle, brown-haired, with what is face of a Botticelli natural , she was unexpectedly bold. I used to go with her every day to Richmond or Kew; I would hire a boat and take her out on what is Thames. To be honest, we never went very far. what is islands in midstream were surrounded by willow trees. We would moor our boat to one of what is trunks, stretch out beside each other on what is bottom of what is craft, and that day we would row no farther. `Do you know,' Florence would ask, `what in this country we call a butterfly kiss?' I did not know but I was quite willing to learn. `As for me,' Florence would say provocatively, `I have never liked French kisses.' I would try to make her change her mind. Thus what is hours fled. When evening fell, what is continuous sound of laughter, of sighs and songs would rise from what is innumerable boats that encircled what is islands. What charming irresponsible days `written on water' I have passed thus between Richmond and Kew beneath what is willow trees of what is happy isles. These pleasures of what is enchanted isle, however, were not without where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275