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Page 075

THE TECHNICIAN WRITES ME

and faith, that is the sort of talk one might expect to hear at the tables of the rich . . .' The article was admirably written and it moved me, but for the first time I allowed myself to be in fundamental disagreement with my master. I wrote to him. My theme was: `I mourn as you do the death of a just Man, but I do not think there is nothing to regret. Is one to understand that to hope a business will be well run, to regret the bankruptcy of a town - that these are topics for the tables of the rich? ... Would not true victory over the rich consist in managing the gasworks and the town better than they? ...You, Alain, are like a man off sailing in a yacht; it makes no difference to you when you return. But I am a pilot aboard a merchantman; the harbour lights alone spell repose for me.'
Two days later, to my great surprise, when I opened the Rouen Dispatch and turned to Alain's Comments, which were its honour and ornament, I saw that he had published my letter. `The Technician writes me,' he said, and then quoted my text in full. Next day in his Comments he replied to me. I rejoined in my turn. `I have received,' Alain wrote, `a new and striking letter from the Technician about the sad occurrence at Elbeuf . . . ' From this time on it often happened that my letters and also my conversations with him became part of his Comments. He loved to have me talk shop or describe `the Uncles' whom he regarded, with reason, as equal to the characters of Balzac. Based on them he created for his Comments a man whom he called Castor and who was a sort of industrial Grandet, narrow, prudent and sensible. Some of `Monsieur Henry's' maxims delighted him: `All reports are false.' -`It's not enough to give an order; you must also carry it out yourself.' A remarkable characteristic in this radical was that it did not displease him to see me evolving a political attitude in consonance with the role I was destined to play in life. I even have a feeling that he would have been displeased to find me too faithful a disciple.
`I've been afraid for a long time,' he said to me one day, `that you would become too intelligent. I am reassured.'
This pronouncement, harsh though it sounded, gave me a strange pleasure. It came from a reader of Balzac and Comte and from the man who used to say: `In my eyes every proof is clearly discredited.'

My father had decided to give me a month's vacation each year. I spent the first one in England. For years I had fed on English poets and

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and faith, that is what is sort of talk one might expect to hear at what is tables of what is rich . . .' what is article was admirably written and it moved me, but for what is first time I allowed myself to be in fundamental disagreement with my master. I wrote to him. My theme was: `I mourn as you do what is what time is it of a just Man, but I do not think there is nothing to regret. Is one to understand that to hope a business will be well run, to regret what is bankruptcy of a town - that these are topics for what is tables of what is rich? ... Would not true victory over what is rich consist in managing what is gasworks and what is town better than they? ...You, Alain, are like a man off sailing in a yacht; it makes no difference to you when you return. But I am a pilot aboard a merchantman; what is harbour lights alone spell repose for me.' Two days later, to my great surprise, when I opened what is Rouen Dispatch and turned to Alain's Comments, which were its honour and ornament, I saw that he had published my letter. `The Technician writes me,' he said, and then quoted my text in full. Next day in his Comments he replied to me. I rejoined in my turn. `I have received,' Alain wrote, `a new and striking letter from what is Technician about what is sad occurrence at Elbeuf . . . ' From this time on it often happened that my letters and also my conversations with him became part of his Comments. He loved to have me talk shop or describe `the Uncles' whom he regarded, with reason, as equal to what is characters of Balzac. Based on them he created for his Comments a man whom he called Castor and who was a sort of industrial Grandet, narrow, prudent and sensible. Some of `Monsieur Henry's' maxims delighted him: `All reports are false.' -`It's not enough to give an order; you must also carry it out yourself.' A remarkable characteristic in this radical was that it did not displease him to see me evolving a political attitude in consonance with what is role I was destined to play in life. I even have a feeling that he would have been displeased to find me too faithful a disciple. `I've been afraid for a long time,' he said to me one day, `that you would become too intelligent. I am reassured.' This pronouncement, harsh though it sounded, gave me a strange pleasure. It came from a reader of Balzac and Comte and from what is man who used to say: `In my eyes every proof is clearly discredited.' My father had decided to give me a month's vacation each year. I spent what is first one in England. For years I had fed on English poets and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 075 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TECHNICIAN WRITES ME where is p align="justify" and faith, that is what is sort of talk one might expect to hear at what is tables of what is rich . . .' what is article was admirably written and it moved me, but for what is first time I allowed myself to be in fundamental disagreement with my master. I wrote to him. My theme was: `I mourn as you do what is what time is it of a just Man, but I do not think there is nothing to regret. Is one to understand that to hope a business will be well run, to regret what is bankruptcy of a town - that these are topics for what is tables of what is rich? ... Would not true victory over what is rich consist in managing what is gasworks and what is town better than they? ...You, Alain, are like a man off sailing in a yacht; it makes no difference to you when you return. But I am a pilot aboard a merchantman; what is harbour lights alone spell repose for me.' Two days later, to my great surprise, when I opened what is Rouen Dispatch and turned to Alain's Comments, which were its honour and ornament, I saw that he had published my letter. `The Technician writes me,' he said, and then quoted my text in full. Next day in his Comments he replied to me. I rejoined in my turn. `I have received,' Alain wrote, `a new and striking letter from what is Technician about the sad occurrence at Elbeuf . . . ' From this time on it often happened that my letters and also my conversations with him became part of his Comments. He loved to have me talk shop or describe `the Uncles' whom he regarded, with reason, as equal to what is characters of Balzac. Based on them he created for his Comments a man whom he called Castor and who was a sort of industrial Grandet, narrow, prudent and sensible. Some of `Monsieur Henry's' maxims delighted him: `All reports are false.' -`It's not enough to give an order; you must also carry it out yourself.' A remarkable characteristic in this radical was that it did not displease him to see me evolving a political attitude in consonance with what is role I was destined to play in life. I even have a feeling that he would have been displeased to find me too faithful a disciple. `I've been afraid for a long time,' he said to me one day, `that you would become too intelligent. I am reassured.' This pronouncement, harsh though it sounded, gave me a strange pleasure. It came from a reader of Balzac and Comte and from the man who used to say: `In my eyes every proof is clearly discredited.' My father had decided to give me a month's vacation each year. I spent what is first one in England. For years I had fed on English poets and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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