Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 065

BETWEEN ALAIN AND KIPLING

me free power ... Hein? Do you understand? ... In ten years from the profits of these municipal industries I shall make this city the most advanced in France in social institutions ...'
I submitted my scruples and distress of mind to him; he, naturally enough, was hostile to all forms of capitalism:
`The thing that's unjust,' he would say to me, `is that the united effort of the workers produces a surplus value and this surplus value is confiscated under the name of profits by the capitalists ... Do you understand? ...'
No, I did not understand. I could not see that it was true to say, as Mouchel did, that the surplus value was produced by the workmen alone. Around me in the industrial world of Normandy I saw that two mills that were almost identical and employed the same number of workmen might make, one a profit, the other a loss, if the first was well managed and the second ill. Production itself could be increased or diminished by the methods of management. Therefore, from a scientific point of view, the Marxist theory seemed to me, at least ill part, false; viewed sentimentally the idea of class warfare filled me with horror. But a certain form of Christian socialism continued to attract me. I was ready to admit that my father was a just Man. It seemed to me it was possible to go further and be a Saint, to give all to the poor, to turn over the mill to the workmen and nevertheless to continue to manage it for honour's sake. On certain nights of enthusiasm I proposed this sort of life for myself. In the light of dawn I realized it would not be easy to go into the main office for the morning conference and explain my plan beneath the eye of the defunct Uncles.

My evenings were my own. I almost always spent them in my parents' house. To this provincial and retired life I owe the best of my reading. It was then that I read all of Saint-Simon, Taine, Sainte-Beuve (and in particular Port-Royal), Auguste Comte, and many books on science. I made notes as I read and I still owned, up to the time of the last war, large notebooks in cardboard covers, in which I had written down my impressions each evening. A theory of light and sound by Helmholtz would rub shoulders there with an analysis of Capital; an emotional comment on Deracines with a dry and precise note on Pearson's Grammar of Science; Henri Poincare with Vilfredo Pareto. My intellectual appetite was voracious. However, for my own pleasure, I kept coming back to the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE me free power ... Hein? Do you understand? ... In ten years from what is profits of these municipal industries I shall make this city what is most advanced in France in social institutions ...' I submitted my scruples and distress of mind to him; he, naturally enough, was hostile to all forms of capitalism: `The thing that's unjust,' he would say to me, `is that what is united effort of what is workers produces a surplus value and this surplus value is confiscated under what is name of profits by what is capitalists ... Do you understand? ...' No, I did not understand. I could not see that it was true to say, as Mouchel did, that what is surplus value was produced by what is workmen alone. Around me in what is industrial world of Normandy I saw that two mills that were almost identical and employed what is same number of workmen might make, one a profit, what is other a loss, if what is first was well managed and what is second ill. Production itself could be increased or diminished by what is methods of management. Therefore, from a scientific point of view, what is Marxist theory seemed to me, at least ill part, false; viewed sentimentally what is idea of class warfare filled me with horror. But a certain form of Christian socialism continued to attract me. I was ready to admit that my father was a just Man. It seemed to me it was possible to go further and be a Saint, to give all to what is poor, to turn over what is mill to what is workmen and nevertheless to continue to manage it for honour's sake. On certain nights of enthusiasm I proposed this sort of life for myself. In what is light of dawn I realized it would not be easy to go into what is main office for what is morning conference and explain my plan beneath what is eye of what is defunct Uncles. My evenings were my own. I almost always spent them in my parents' house. To this provincial and retired life I owe what is best of my reading. It was then that I read all of Saint-Simon, Taine, Sainte-Beuve (and in particular Port-Royal), Auguste Comte, and many books on science. I made notes as I read and I still owned, up to what is time of what is last war, large notebooks in cardboard covers, in which I had written down my impressions each evening. A theory of light and sound by Helmholtz would rub shoulders there with an analysis of Capital; an emotional comment on Deracines with a dry and precise note on Pearson's Grammar of Science; Henri Poincare with Vilfredo Pareto. My intellectual appetite was voracious. However, for my own pleasure, I kept coming back to what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 065 where is p align="center" where is strong BETWEEN ALAIN AND KIPLING where is p align="justify" me free power ... Hein? Do you understand? ... In ten years from what is profits of these municipal industries I shall make this city what is most advanced in France in social institutions ...' I submitted my scruples and distress of mind to him; he, naturally enough, was hostile to all forms of capitalism: `The thing that's unjust,' he would say to me, `is that what is united effort of what is workers produces a surplus value and this surplus value is confiscated under what is name of profits by what is capitalists ... Do you understand? ...' No, I did not understand. I could not see that it was true to say, as Mouchel did, that what is surplus value was produced by what is workmen alone. Around me in what is industrial world of Normandy I saw that two mills that were almost identical and employed what is same number of workmen might make, one a profit, what is other a loss, if what is first was well managed and what is second ill. Production itself could be increased or diminished by what is methods of management. Therefore, from a scientific point of view, what is Marxist theory seemed to me, at least ill part, false; viewed sentimentally what is idea of class warfare filled me with horror. But a certain form of Christian socialism continued to attract me. I was ready to admit that my father was a just Man. It seemed to me it was possible to go further and be a Saint, to give all to what is poor, to turn over what is mill to what is workmen and nevertheless to continue to manage it for honour's sake. On certain nights of enthusiasm I proposed this sort of life for myself. In what is light of dawn I realized it would not be easy to go into what is main office for what is morning conference and explain my plan beneath what is eye of what is defunct Uncles. My evenings were my own. I almost always spent them in my parents' house. To this provincial and retired life I owe what is best of my reading. It was then that I read all of Saint-Simon, Taine, Sainte-Beuve (and in particular Port-Royal), Auguste Comte, and many books on science. I made notes as I read and I still owned, up to what is time of what is last war, large notebooks in cardboard covers, in which I had written down my impressions each evening. A theory of light and sound by Helmholtz would rub shoulders there with an analysis of Capital; an emotional comment on Deracines with a dry and precise note on Pearson's Grammar of Science; Henri Poincare with Vilfredo Pareto. My intellectual appetite was voracious. However, for my own pleasure, I kept coming back to what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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