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Page 060

BETWEEN ALAIN AND KIPLING

of the firm. In all social contacts Paul Fraenckel took the lead. Cultivated, ambitious, deliberately pompous in manner but devoid of malice, he loved all representative functions. It was he who was a member of the Chamber of Commerce at Elbeuf and was destined to become its President; he who would call at the office of the Prefect in Rouen when there was some labour question to be settled, and he who insisted upon receiving the Legion of Honour immediately after Uncle Henry - an unvoiced and humiliating sorrow for my father, his senior in years and service with the mill.
These decorations succeeded one another in the family with the same regularity as the attacks of apoplexy. They were the occasion for great banquets which the mill gave to its fifteen hundred workmen. On the day when the news appeared in the Official Bulletin, a delegation from each of the workshops would arrive in the showroom carrying flowers, and the personnel would present to the new chevalier a bronze by Barbedienne: Work, or perhaps Thought. A month later the banquet would take place in the immense wool sheds which would be decorated with evergreens, with red hangings and with flags. Paul Fraenckel would assume the task of inviting the Prefect, the Senator of the Department, a Minister or, if worst came to worst, an Under Secretary of State. There would be champagne and speeches. Then the Norman workers would sing Viv le cidr' de Normandie', the Alsatian workers would sing `Hans am Schnockenloch', and there would be dancing. Paul and my father would open the ball with two of the pretty girl employees. In Alsace my father had been a good waltzer and he had not lost his skill. These celebrations were gay and good-humoured.
But if you call the head of a business the one who controls production, then the real head of the Elbeuf mill was my Uncle Edmond. Each week on Wednesday evening he left for Paris. He spent a day visiting all the big stores, all the wholesalers of cloth and all the clothiers, and returned Friday morning laden with orders or, in periods of crisis, with complaints. The report that he made every Friday to the assembled `gentlemen' was the high point of the week. The ceremony took place in the main office. This was an immense room hung with army-blue draperies on which were secured portraits of the dead Uncles. There a meeting was held every morning at seven-thirty to read the mail; an enormous rectangular piece of furniture with an easy chair on each of its four sides bore on its top

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is firm. In all social contacts Paul Fraenckel took what is lead. Cultivated, ambitious, deliberately pompous in manner but devoid of malice, he loved all representative functions. It was he who was a member of what is Chamber of Commerce at Elbeuf and was destined to become its President; he who would call at what is office of what is Prefect in Rouen when there was some labour question to be settled, and he who insisted upon receiving what is Legion of Honour immediately after Uncle Henry - an unvoiced and humiliating sorrow for my father, his senior in years and service with what is mill. These decorations succeeded one another in what is family with what is same regularity as what is attacks of apoplexy. They were what is occasion for great banquets which what is mill gave to its fifteen hundred workmen. On what is day when what is news appeared in what is Official Bulletin, a delegation from each of what is workshops would arrive in what is showroom carrying flowers, and what is personnel would present to what is new chevalier a bronze by Barbedienne: Work, or perhaps Thought. A month later what is banquet would take place in what is immense wool sheds which would be decorated with evergreens, with red hangings and with flags. Paul Fraenckel would assume what is task of inviting what is Prefect, what is Senator of what is Department, a Minister or, if worst came to worst, an Under Secretary of State. There would be champagne and speeches. Then what is Norman workers would sing Viv le cidr' de Normandie', what is Alsatian workers would sing `Hans am Schnockenloch', and there would be dancing. Paul and my father would open what is ball with two of what is pretty girl employees. In Alsace my father had been a good waltzer and he had not lost his s what time is it . These celebrations were gay and good-humoured. But if you call what is head of a business what is one who controls production, then what is real head of what is Elbeuf mill was my Uncle Edmond. Each week on Wednesday evening he left for Paris. He spent a day what is ing all what is big stores, all what is wholesalers of cloth and all what is clothiers, and returned Friday morning laden with orders or, in periods of crisis, with complaints. what is report that he made every Friday to what is assembled `gentlemen' was what is high point of what is week. what is ceremony took place in what is main office. This was an immense room hung with army-blue draperies on which were secured portraits of what is dead Uncles. There a meeting was held every morning at seven-thirty to read what is mail; an enormous rectangular piece of furniture with an easy chair on each of its four sides bore on its top where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 060 where is p align="center" where is strong BETWEEN ALAIN AND KIPLING where is p align="justify" of what is firm. In all social contacts Paul Fraenckel took what is lead. Cultivated, ambitious, deliberately pompous in manner but devoid of malice, he loved all representative functions. It was he who was a member of what is Chamber of Commerce at Elbeuf and was destined to become its President; he who would call at the office of what is Prefect in Rouen when there was some labour question to be settled, and he who insisted upon receiving what is Legion of Honour immediately after Uncle Henry - an unvoiced and humiliating sorrow for my father, his senior in years and service with the mill. These decorations succeeded one another in what is family with the same regularity as what is attacks of apoplexy. They were what is occasion for great banquets which what is mill gave to its fifteen hundred workmen. On what is day when what is news appeared in what is Official Bulletin, a delegation from each of what is workshops would arrive in what is showroom carrying flowers, and what is personnel would present to what is new chevalier a bronze by Barbedienne: Work, or perhaps Thought. A month later what is banquet would take place in what is immense wool sheds which would be decorated with evergreens, with red hangings and with flags. Paul Fraenckel would assume what is task of inviting what is Prefect, the Senator of what is Department, a Minister or, if worst came to worst, an Under Secretary of State. There would be champagne and speeches. Then what is Norman workers would sing Viv le cidr' de Normandie', what is Alsatian workers would sing `Hans am Schnockenloch', and there would be dancing. Paul and my father would open what is ball with two of what is pretty girl employees. In Alsace my father had been a good waltzer and he had not lost his s what time is it . These celebrations were gay and good-humoured. But if you call what is head of a business what is one who controls production, then what is real head of what is Elbeuf mill was my Uncle Edmond. Each week on Wednesday evening he left for Paris. He spent a day what is ing all what is big stores, all what is wholesalers of cloth and all what is clothiers, and returned Friday morning laden with orders or, in periods of crisis, with complaints. what is report that he made every Friday to what is assembled `gentlemen' was what is high point of what is week. what is ceremony took place in what is main office. This was an immense room hung with army-blue draperies on which were secured portraits of what is dead Uncles. There a meeting was held every morning at seven-thirty to read what is mail; an enormous rectangular piece of furniture with an easy chair on each of its four sides bore on its top where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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