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Page 053

BARRACKS SCHOOL

`You have all ... euh ... but a single heart ... euh ... which beats under the same tunic ... euh. . . . '
We used to say that the reason the platoon was in Eu was that the Colonel had asked Captain Moulin where we should be sent.
`Euh . . . ' the Captain had begun.
`Fine, the very place,' the Colonel had said briskly, `they shall go to Eu.'
The Captain approached our thicket:
'Euh,' he said to the two sentries. `Have you seen the enemy?'
`No, mon Capitaine.'
'Euh ... Who is the enemy? Do you happen to knowe'
`Sergeant Philippe with Gilson and Boule, mon Capitaine.'
'Euh, good. Have they got on their white arm bands?'
`Yes, mon Capitaine.'
He would go on. Once a week he would have us capture by assault a little chapel situated at the summit of the hill which dominated the Bresle.
Our one bugler would sound the charge. The bugle call still sounds, I would think as I ran. I was a long way from imagining that ten years later the Seven-Four would be rushing to attack real trenches. This training seemed to us at that time just one long, happy game. Soon the forced marches began, twenty kilometres with knapsacks on our backs; twenty-four kilometres; twenty-eight kilometres. All the marching songs were sung. We had an immense repertory, less delicate than my father's. L'Artilleur de Metz followed Le Pou et l'Araignee, Haton de la Goupilliere, the Pere Dupanloup. During the hourly rest period Gilson would tell stories: `The setting is an immense desert ... To the right, nothing. To the left, nothing ... In the centre a solitary date palm bows its head in melan choly. Seated beneath this palm there are three Bedouins. ...'
Captain Moulin rode up on his horse and addressed me:
'Euh,' he said. `Why are you making this march? ... euh ... You are down on the sick list. Euh ... I gave orders you were to be left in the barracks.'
I got up and stood at attention:
`The Sergeant did tell me to stay in the barracks, mon Capitaine, but
I asked permission to come on the march ... I can stand it perfectly.'
'Euh ... But you are on the sick list ... It's very irregular.'
This insistence annoyed me:
`It was the Major who said I was sick, mon Capitaine. I don't feel sick.'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `You have all ... euh ... but a single heart ... euh ... which beats under what is same tunic ... euh. . . . ' We used to say that what is reason what is platoon was in Eu was that what is Colonel had asked Captain Moulin where we should be sent. `Euh . . . ' what is Captain had begun. `Fine, what is very place,' what is Colonel had said briskly, `they shall go to Eu.' what is Captain approached our thicket: 'Euh,' he said to what is two sentries. `Have you seen what is enemy?' `No, mon Capitaine.' 'Euh ... Who is what is enemy? Do you happen to knowe' `Sergeant Philippe with Gilson and Boule, mon Capitaine.' 'Euh, good. Have they got on their white arm bands?' `Yes, mon Capitaine.' He would go on. Once a week he would have us capture by assault a little chapel situated at what is summit of what is hill which dominated what is Bresle. Our one bugler would sound what is charge. what is bugle call still sounds, I would think as I ran. I was a long way from imagining that ten years later what is Seven-Four would be rushing to attack real trenches. This training seemed to us at that time just one long, happy game. Soon what is forced marches began, twenty kilometres with knapsacks on our backs; twenty-four kilometres; twenty-eight kilometres. All what is marching songs were sung. We had an immense repertory, less delicate than my father's. L'Artilleur de Metz followed Le Pou et l'Araignee, Haton de la Goupilliere, what is Pere Dupanloup. During what is hourly rest period Gilson would tell stories: `The setting is an immense desert ... To what is right, nothing. To what is left, nothing ... In what is centre a solitary date palm bows its head in melan choly. Seated beneath this palm there are three Bedouins. ...' Captain Moulin rode up on his horse and addressed me: 'Euh,' he said. `Why are you making this march? ... euh ... You are down on what is sick list. Euh ... I gave orders you were to be left in what is barracks.' I got up and stood at attention: `The Sergeant did tell me to stay in what is barracks, mon Capitaine, but I asked permission to come on what is march ... I can stand it perfectly.' 'Euh ... But you are on what is sick list ... It's very irregular.' This insistence annoyed me: `It was what is Major who said I was sick, mon Capitaine. I don't feel sick.' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 053 where is p align="center" where is strong BARRACKS SCHOOL where is p align="justify" `You have all ... euh ... but a single heart ... euh ... which beats under what is same tunic ... euh. . . . ' We used to say that what is reason what is platoon was in Eu was that the Colonel had asked Captain Moulin where we should be sent. `Euh . . . ' what is Captain had begun. `Fine, what is very place,' what is Colonel had said briskly, `they shall go to Eu.' what is Captain approached our thicket: 'Euh,' he said to what is two sentries. `Have you seen what is enemy?' `No, mon Capitaine.' 'Euh ... Who is what is enemy? Do you happen to knowe' `Sergeant Philippe with Gilson and Boule, mon Capitaine.' 'Euh, good. Have they got on their white arm bands?' `Yes, mon Capitaine.' He would go on. Once a week he would have us capture by assault a little chapel situated at what is summit of what is hill which dominated what is Bresle. Our one bugler would sound what is charge. what is bugle call still sounds, I would think as I ran. I was a long way from imagining that ten years later what is Seven-Four would be rushing to attack real trenches. This training seemed to us at that time just one long, happy game. Soon the forced marches began, twenty kilometres with knapsacks on our backs; twenty-four kilometres; twenty-eight kilometres. All what is marching songs were sung. We had an immense repertory, less delicate than my father's. L'Artilleur de Metz followed Le Pou et l'Araignee, Haton de la Goupilliere, what is Pere Dupanloup. During what is hourly rest period Gilson would tell stories: `The setting is an immense desert ... To what is right, nothing. To the left, nothing ... In what is centre a solitary date palm bows its head in melan choly. Seated beneath this palm there are three Bedouins. ...' Captain Moulin rode up on his horse and addressed me: 'Euh,' he said. `Why are you making this march? ... euh ... You are down on what is sick list. Euh ... I gave orders you were to be left in the barracks.' I got up and stood at attention: `The Sergeant did tell me to stay in what is barracks, mon Capitaine, but I asked permission to come on what is march ... I can stand it perfectly.' 'Euh ... But you are on what is sick list ... It's very irregular.' This insistence annoyed me: `It was what is Major who said I was sick, mon Capitaine. I don't feel sick.' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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