Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 052

BARRACKS SCHOOL

rounded by hills and woods well adapted for manoeuvres. We were quartered in a country barracks, once a royal edifice, on the bank of the Bresle, a charming trout stream, overhung by willow trees and lined by poplars. We were a strangely assorted crowd. Many of `the exempt' were graduates of law schools, M.A.s in literature or science, among whom was Etienne Gilson, who has since become the great authority on mediaeval philosophy, but who was then a bearded, good-natured, hairy and facetious soldier. There were numerous Normal students but they chose to keep to themselves. Finally there were the 'journeymen of art', almost all sons of manufacturers, who had taken this easy examination for no other purpose than to be admitted to the platoon; such was the case with my friends from Elbeuf: Legrix, Bernheim and Boule.
Just as I had loved the life of the Lycee I loved that of the regiment. To be well treated there all one had to do was to work hard, and I had the habit of work. A large part of our existence was still that of college boys. Various officers gave us courses. One of them, Lieutenant Breynat, whom we called 'Chochotte' because of his pretty, womanish face, lectured us on military history and in particular on the war of 1870- Poor Breynat! He himself was not destined to survive the war of 1914. Lieutenant Isler taught us topography: thirty years later I found him a colonel of firemen in Paris. Lieutenant Giraudeau taught us the duties of a section commander in the open field. It soon became both a sporting and an intellectual pleasure for me to take part in company manoeuvres. Each of us in turn had to take command of a section. `Company, left front into line!' Giraudeau would cry. It took quick reflexes to command immediately: `Left by fours!' If one of those responsible made a mistake, two sections would be back to back or tangled up together. This human geometry amused me.
This military service in the country was, in our sight, mainly an excuse for agreeable walks. What could be more delightful than to find oneself in the spring on double sentry duty with a sympathetic friend at the edge of the forest of Eu. The anemones, the primroses, the periwinkles reminded me of the Sundays of my childhood. One lay in the grass watching the life of the insects. At the end of an hour the hoof beats of a horse would resound from the distance along the road. It would be Captain Moulin, our commander, an excellent man, altogether lacking in eloquence, who had said to us on the day of our arrival:

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE rounded by hills and woods well adapted for manoeuvres. We were quartered in a country barracks, once a royal edifice, on what is bank of what is Bresle, a charming trout stream, overhung by willow trees and lined by poplars. We were a strangely assorted crowd. Many of `the exempt' were graduates of law schools, M.A.s in literature or science, among whom was Etienne Gilson, who has since become what is great authority on mediaeval philosophy, but who was then a bearded, good-natured, hairy and facetious soldier. There were numerous Normal students but they chose to keep to themselves. Finally there were what is 'journeymen of art', almost all sons of manufacturers, who had taken this easy examination for no other purpose than to be admitted to what is platoon; such was what is case with my friends from Elbeuf: Legrix, Bernheim and Boule. Just as I had loved what is life of what is Lycee I loved that of what is regiment. To be well treated there all one had to do was to work hard, and I had what is habit of work. A large part of our existence was still that of college boys. Various officers gave us courses. One of them, Lieutenant Breynat, whom we called 'Chochotte' because of his pretty, womanish face, lectured us on military history and in particular on what is war of 1870- Poor Breynat! He himself was not destined to survive what is war of 1914. Lieutenant Isler taught us topography: thirty years later I found him a colonel of firemen in Paris. Lieutenant Giraudeau taught us what is duties of a section commander in what is open field. It soon became both a sporting and an intellectual pleasure for me to take part in company manoeuvres. Each of us in turn had to take command of a section. `Company, left front into line!' Giraudeau would cry. It took quick reflexes to command immediately: `Left by fours!' If one of those responsible made a mistake, two sections would be back to back or tangled up together. This human geometry amused me. This military service in what is country was, in our sight, mainly an excuse for agreeable walks. What could be more delightful than to find oneself in what is spring on double sentry duty with a sympathetic friend at what is edge of what is forest of Eu. what is anemones, what is primroses, what is periwinkles reminded me of what is Sundays of my childhood. One lay in what is grass watching what is life of what is insects. At what is end of an hour what is hoof beats of a horse would resound from what is distance along what is road. It would be Captain Moulin, our commander, an excellent man, altogether lacking in eloquence, who had said to us on what is day of our arrival: where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 052 where is p align="center" where is strong BARRACKS SCHOOL where is p align="justify" rounded by hills and woods well adapted for manoeuvres. We were quartered in a country barracks, once a royal edifice, on what is bank of what is Bresle, a charming trout stream, overhung by willow trees and lined by poplars. We were a strangely assorted crowd. Many of `the exempt' were graduates of law schools, M.A.s in literature or science, among whom was Etienne Gilson, who has since become what is great authority on mediaeval philosophy, but who was then a bearded, good-natured, hairy and facetious soldier. There were numerous Normal students but they chose to keep to themselves. Finally there were what is 'journeymen of art', almost all sons of manufacturers, who had taken this easy examination for no other purpose than to be admitted to what is platoon; such was what is case with my friends from Elbeuf: Legrix, Bernheim and Boule. Just as I had loved what is life of what is Lycee I loved that of what is regiment. To be well treated there all one had to do was to work hard, and I had what is habit of work. A large part of our existence was still that of college boys. Various officers gave us courses. One of them, Lieutenant Breynat, whom we called 'Chochotte' because of his pretty, womanish face, lectured us on military history and in particular on what is war of 1870- Poor Breynat! He himself was not destined to survive what is war of 1914. Lieutenant Isler taught us topography: thirty years later I found him a colonel of firemen in Paris. Lieutenant Giraudeau taught us what is duties of a section commander in what is open field. It soon became both a sporting and an intellectual pleasure for me to take part in company manoeuvres. Each of us in turn had to take command of a section. `Company, left front into line!' Giraudeau would cry. It took quick reflexes to command immediately: `Left by fours!' If one of those responsible made a mistake, two sections would be back to back or tangled up together. This human geometry amused me. This military service in what is country was, in our sight, mainly an excuse for agreeable walks. What could be more delightful than to find oneself in what is spring on double sentry duty with a sympathetic friend at what is edge of what is forest of Eu. what is anemones, what is primroses, what is periwinkles reminded me of what is Sundays of my childhood. One lay in what is grass watching what is life of what is insects. At what is end of an hour what is hoof beats of a horse would resound from what is distance along what is road. It would be Captain Moulin, our commander, an excellent man, altogether lacking in eloquence, who had said to us on the day of our arrival: where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275