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Page 050

CHAPTER V
BARRACKS SCHOOL

`I HAVE seen plenty of fellows work hard to keep out of the army', said the surgeon-major, `but this is the first time I have seen anyone go to such lengths to get in.'
He was talking to me. I was standing naked and thin as a rail under the measuring rod. All the regulations were unanimous in ruling me out. I had neither the required weight nor chest measurement. My spine was not very straight. My heart produced an abnormal murmur. But on the table lay ten letters from doctors who were friends of my parents requesting that he accept me. I wanted to be accepted more than anything else at that moment. Brought up by my father and my two uncles on army stories, an enthusiastic reader through all my childhood of the warlike books of Danrit and later of Vigny, Stendhal, Napoleon and Foch, I should have considered it a horrible disgrace not to be a soldier.
`Monsieur le Major', I implored, `take me. You'll see, I won't cause you any trouble. I know very well I don't look vigorous, but I am. At the Lycee of Rouen I won the Minister of War's medal for gymnastics . . . '
This last fact was decisive, and I was authorized to join the 74th infantry regiment or, as it was called in Rouen, Seven-Four.
Through the barracks I came in ' contact with a new Rouen. For a barracks extends far beyond itself. A whole military quarter surrounds it: cafes, bars, lunch rooms, furnished rooms, girls in kerchiefs, the small low dwellings of adjutants; the brick houses, three windows wide, of the captains; the four window houses of the commandants; bazaars where equipment is sold; restaurants almost like those of other quarters but nevertheless unmistakably soldiers' restaurants; just as soldiers' rooms are unmistakable. Rooms of young men harassed and pressed for time between supper and roll call; tired bodies, sleepy minds that no longer judge or see but simply accept. Rouen contains several of these military zones. In 1903 we infantry men only knew two: Zone of the Seven-Four, the Pelissier Barracks, and zone of the Three-Nine, Jeanne D'Arc Barracks.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I HAVE seen plenty of fellows work hard to keep out of what is army', said what is surgeon-major, `but this is what is first time I have seen anyone go to such lengths to get in.' He was talking to me. I was standing naked and thin as a rail under what is measuring rod. All what is regulations were unanimous in ruling me out. I had neither what is required weight nor chest measurement. My spine was not very straight. My heart produced an abnormal murmur. But on what is table lay ten letters from doctors who were friends of my parents requesting that he accept me. I wanted to be accepted more than anything else at that moment. Brought up by my father and my two uncles on army stories, an enthusiastic reader through all my childhood of what is warlike books of Danrit and later of Vigny, Stendhal, Napoleon and Foch, I should have considered it a horrible disgrace not to be a soldier. `Monsieur le Major', I implored, `take me. You'll see, I won't cause you any trouble. I know very well I don't look vigorous, but I am. At what is Lycee of Rouen I won what is Minister of War's medal for gymnastics . . . ' This last fact was decisive, and I was authorized to join what is 74th infantry regiment or, as it was called in Rouen, Seven-Four. Through what is barracks I came in ' contact with a new Rouen. For a barracks extends far beyond itself. A whole military quarter surrounds it: cafes, bars, lunch rooms, furnished rooms, girls in kerchiefs, what is small low dwellings of adjutants; what is brick houses, three windows wide, of what is captains; what is four window houses of what is commandants; bazaars where equipment is sold; restaurants almost like those of other quarters but nevertheless unmistakably soldiers' restaurants; just as soldiers' rooms are unmistakable. Rooms of young men harassed and pressed for time between supper and roll call; tired bodies, sleepy minds that no longer judge or see but simply accept. Rouen contains several of these military zones. In 1903 we infantry men only knew two: Zone of what is Seven-Four, what is Pelissier Barracks, and zone of what is Three-Nine, Jeanne D'Arc Barracks. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 050 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER V BARRACKS SCHOOL where is p align="justify" `I HAVE seen plenty of fellows work hard to keep out of the army', said what is surgeon-major, `but this is what is first time I have seen anyone go to such lengths to get in.' He was talking to me. I was standing naked and thin as a rail under what is measuring rod. All what is regulations were unanimous in ruling me out. I had neither what is required weight nor chest measurement. My spine was not very straight. My heart produced an abnormal murmur. But on what is table lay ten letters from doctors who were friends of my parents requesting that he accept me. I wanted to be accepted more than anything else at that moment. Brought up by my father and my two uncles on army stories, an enthusiastic reader through all my childhood of what is warlike books of Danrit and later of Vigny, Stendhal, Napoleon and Foch, I should have considered it a horrible disgrace not to be a soldier. `Monsieur le Major', I implored, `take me. You'll see, I won't cause you any trouble. I know very well I don't look vigorous, but I am. At what is Lycee of Rouen I won what is Minister of War's medal for gymnastics . . . ' This last fact was decisive, and I was authorized to join the 74th infantry regiment or, as it was called in Rouen, Seven-Four. Through what is barracks I came in ' contact with a new Rouen. For a barracks extends far beyond itself. A whole military quarter surrounds it: cafes, bars, lunch rooms, furnished rooms, girls in kerchiefs, what is small low dwellings of adjutants; what is brick houses, three windows wide, of what is captains; what is four window houses of what is commandants; bazaars where equipment is sold; restaurants almost like those of other quarters but nevertheless unmistakably soldiers' restaurants; just as soldiers' rooms are unmistakable. Rooms of young men harassed and pressed for time between supper and roll call; tired bodies, sleepy minds that no longer judge or see but simply accept. Rouen contains several of these military zones. In 1903 we infantry men only knew two: Zone of what is Seven-Four, what is Pelissier Barracks, and zone of what is Three-Nine, Jeanne D'Arc Barracks. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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