Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 045

THE RIVER OF THE ARROW

would suit me. I did not hope ever to have in the eyes of my students the prestige of an Alain, but I might be a creditable professor, conscientious and perhaps beloved. In addition, I wished to write, and in some peaceful vost, in the provinces I should have leisure. I explained these plans to Chartier while the Censor was calling out:
`Class in Elementary Mathematics: LEFEVRE (Henri) . . . '
`I don't believe you are right,' he said to me. `Not but that you would be sure to succeed in such a career. I can see you being admitted to the Normale without any trouble at all. But afterward; . . . There would be great danger for you. You have a dangerous facility. I am afraid you would write before you were mature enough to write. As a professor you would see almost nothing of the world that as a novelist you would have to re-create. While you were still too young you would be taken up by little literary cliques. It was not thus that Balzac began, nor Dickens. The one was a notary's clerk and printer; the other a journalist. Those are professions that teach you about life. Isn't your father a manufacturer? I should much rather see you go into his factory. There you will see men at work. You will be David Sechard, Cesar Birotteau, and perhaps Dr. Benassis. In the evening you will copy out by hand the Chartreuse or the Rouge in order to learn the technique of writing, as young painters copy the pictures of their masters. There's a fine start in life.'
That evening when I had returned to Elbeuf by the usual train, laden down with books, I repeated this conversation to my father. His kind face lighted up:
`I should never have wanted to use pressure,' he said, `but since Monsieur Chartier has given you his advice, I am happy to be in agreement with him . . . I also believe that you ought to come into the mill with us or at least begin that way ... If you continue to wish to write, your evenings will be free and, if you really have talent, no doubt in the end it will show itself ... We must take into consideration that the workmen are attached to our family, that later on they would accept you as their head more willingly than a stranger, and that we have obligations toward all these Alsatians ... In the mill you will have a very brilliant future ... As for me I have suffered under the Uncles, but now they are old and the generation of young Fraenckels will be like brothers to you as they have been to me.'
I was not tempted. What would I be doing, a reader of Plato and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE would suit me. I did not hope ever to have in what is eyes of my students what is prestige of an Alain, but I might be a creditable professor, conscientious and perhaps beloved. In addition, I wished to write, and in some peaceful vost, in what is provinces I should have leisure. I explained these plans to Chartier while what is Censor was calling out: `Class in Elementary Mathematics: LEFEVRE (Henri) . . . ' `I don't believe you are right,' he said to me. `Not but that you would be sure to succeed in such a career. I can see you being admitted to what is Normale without any trouble at all. But afterward; . . . There would be great danger for you. You have a dangerous facility. I am afraid you would write before you were mature enough to write. As a professor you would see almost nothing of what is world that as a novelist you would have to re-create. While you were still too young you would be taken up by little literary cliques. It was not thus that Balzac began, nor Dickens. what is one was a notary's clerk and printer; what is other a journalist. Those are professions that teach you about life. Isn't your father a manufacturer? I should much rather see you go into his factory. There you will see men at work. You will be David Sechard, Cesar Birotteau, and perhaps Dr. Benassis. In what is evening you will copy out by hand what is Chartreuse or what is Rouge in order to learn what is technique of writing, as young painters copy what is pictures of their masters. There's a fine start in life.' That evening when I had returned to Elbeuf by what is usual train, laden down with books, I repeated this conversation to my father. His kind face lighted up: `I should never have wanted to use pressure,' he said, `but since Monsieur Chartier has given you his advice, I am happy to be in agreement with him . . . I also believe that you ought to come into what is mill with us or at least begin that way ... If you continue to wish to write, your evenings will be free and, if you really have talent, no doubt in what is end it will show itself ... We must take into consideration that what is workmen are attached to our family, that later on they would accept you as their head more willingly than a stranger, and that we have obligations toward all these Alsatians ... In what is mill you will have a very brilliant future ... As for me I have suffered under what is Uncles, but now they are old and what is generation of young Fraenckels will be like brothers to you as they have been to me.' I was not tempted. What would I be doing, a reader of Plato and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 045 where is p align="center" where is strong what is RIVER OF what is ARROW where is p align="justify" would suit me. I did not hope ever to have in what is eyes of my students what is prestige of an Alain, but I might be a creditable professor, conscientious and perhaps beloved. In addition, I wished to write, and in some peaceful vost, in what is provinces I should have leisure. I explained these plans to Chartier while what is Censor was calling out: `Class in Elementary Mathematics: LEFEVRE (Henri) . . . ' `I don't believe you are right,' he said to me. `Not but that you would be sure to succeed in such a career. I can see you being admitted to what is Normale without any trouble at all. But afterward; . . . There would be great danger for you. You have a dangerous facility. I am afraid you would write before you were mature enough to write. As a professor you would see almost nothing of what is world that as a novelist you would have to re-create. While you were still too young you would be taken up by little literary cliques. It was not thus that Balzac began, nor Dickens. what is one was a notary's clerk and printer; what is other a journalist. Those are professions that teach you about life. Isn't your father a manufacturer? I should much rather see you go into his factory. There you will see men at work. You will be David Sechard, Cesar Birotteau, and perhaps Dr. Benassis. In what is evening you will copy out by hand what is Chartreuse or what is Rouge in order to learn what is technique of writing, as young painters copy what is pictures of their masters. There's a fine start in life.' That evening when I had returned to Elbeuf by what is usual train, laden down with books, I repeated this conversation to my father. His kind face lighted up: `I should never have wanted to use pressure,' he said, `but since Monsieur Chartier has given you his advice, I am happy to be in agreement with him . . . I also believe that you ought to come into what is mill with us or at least begin that way ... If you continue to wish to write, your evenings will be free and, if you really have talent, no doubt in what is end it will show itself ... We must take into consideration that what is workmen are attached to our family, that later on they would accept you as their head more willingly than a stranger, and that we have obligations toward all these Alsatians ... In what is mill you will have a very brilliant future ... As for me I have suffered under what is Uncles, but now they are old and what is generation of young Fraenckels will be like brothers to you as they have been to me.' I was not tempted. What would I be doing, a reader of Plato and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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