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THE RIVER OF THE ARROW

drew, this is approximately what I find. His course began with a long discussion of the theory of perception. He showed us that to perceive even the simplest object requires very complex reasoning, and that this reasoning may go wrong, hence the illusions of the senses. How often he talked to us of the stereoscope and of the straight stick which appears broken under water, facts which reveal the weakness of the mind. Then came the illusions of memory, of instinct and of reason. All of this made apparent the difficulties that beset the search for truth. Socrates and Descartes helped us at least to find a provisory method. Spinoza taught us to make our emotions serve us in our search. Kant kept us from pursuing the blind alley of metaphysics by showing us that we would find nothing in that direction except the laws of our own mind. Auguste Comte taught us to respect institutions and ceremonies. One of Alain's striking characteristics was that when he was expounding the doctrine of some philosopher he would never criticize it, but would give us whatever truth was in it. Refutation seemed to him a miserable game. `It's a great mark of mediocrity to admire mediocrely.' He admired generously, and he admired even some of the writers whom at that time it was smart to ridicule, such as Victor Hugo and George Sand. He considered (rightly) Les Miserables and Consuelo to be great books. Furthermore, in class he permitted hardly any discussion, holding it to be a waste of time. `The master teaches, the students work,' he would say.
What I cannot convey by words is the enthusiasm inspired in us by this search, boldly pursued with such a guide; the excitement of those classes which one entered with the persistent hope of discovering, that very morning, the secret of life, and from which one departed with the joy of having understood that perhaps there was no such secret but that nevertheless it was possible to be a human being and to be so with dignity and nobility. When I read in Kim the story of the Lama who sought so piously for the River of the Arrow, I thought of our search. Alain gave us not so much a doctrine (he would gladly have said with Gide: `Wean yourself from me!'), not so much a system, as a method and a faith. `One must go to the truth with all one's soul.' From his lessons I have retained a horror of hypocrisy, a desire to understand and a respect for my adversaries. Like all human beings I have, in the course of my life, committed many faults; if I have occasionally acted well I owe it to the example of my father and to the teaching of Alain.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE drew, this is approximately what I find. His course began with a long discussion of what is theory of perception. He showed us that to perceive even what is simplest object requires very complex reasoning, and that this reasoning may go wrong, hence what is illusions of what is senses. How often he talked to us of what is stereoscope and of what is straight stick which appears broken under water, facts which reveal what is weakness of what is mind. Then came what is illusions of memory, of instinct and of reason. All of this made apparent what is difficulties that beset what is search for truth. Socrates and Descartes helped us at least to find a provisory method. Spinoza taught us to make our emotions serve us in our search. Kant kept us from pursuing what is blind alley of metaphysics by showing us that we would find nothing in that direction except what is laws of our own mind. Auguste Comte taught us to respect institutions and ceremonies. One of Alain's striking characteristics was that when he was expounding what is doctrine of some philosopher he would never criticize it, but would give us whatever truth was in it. Refutation seemed to him a miserable game. `It's a great mark of mediocrity to admire mediocrely.' He admired generously, and he admired even some of what is writers whom at that time it was smart to ridicule, such as Victor Hugo and George Sand. He considered (rightly) Les Miserables and Consuelo to be great books. Furthermore, in class he permitted hardly any discussion, holding it to be a waste of time. `The master teaches, what is students work,' he would say. What I cannot convey by words is what is enthusiasm inspired in us by this search, boldly pursued with such a guide; what is excitement of those classes which one entered with what is persistent hope of discovering, that very morning, what is secret of life, and from which one departed with what is joy of having understood that perhaps there was no such secret but that nevertheless it was possible to be a human being and to be so with dignity and nobility. When I read in Kim what is story of what is Lama who sought so piously for what is River of what is Arrow, I thought of our search. Alain gave us not so much a doctrine (he would gladly have said with Gide: `Wean yourself from me!'), not so much a system, as a method and a faith. `One must go to what is truth with all one's soul.' From his lessons I have retained a horror of hypocrisy, a desire to understand and a respect for my adversaries. Like all human beings I have, in what is course of my life, committed many faults; if I have occasionally acted well I owe it to what is example of my father and to what is teaching of Alain. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 043 where is p align="center" where is strong what is RIVER OF what is ARROW where is p align="justify" drew, this is approximately what I find. His course began with a long discussion of what is theory of perception. He showed us that to perceive even what is simplest object requires very complex reasoning, and that this reasoning may go wrong, hence what is illusions of what is senses. How often he talked to us of what is stereoscope and of what is straight stick which appears broken under water, facts which reveal what is weakness of what is mind. Then came what is illusions of memory, of instinct and of reason. All of this made apparent what is difficulties that beset what is search for truth. Socrates and Descartes helped us at least to find a provisory method. Spinoza taught us to make our emotions serve us in our search. Kant kept us from pursuing what is blind alley of metaphysics by showing us that we would find nothing in that direction except what is laws of our own mind. Auguste Comte taught us to respect institutions and ceremonies. One of Alain's striking characteristics was that when he was expounding what is doctrine of some philosopher he would never criticize it, but would give us whatever truth was in it. Refutation seemed to him a miserable game. `It's a great mark of mediocrity to admire mediocrely.' He admired generously, and he admired even some of what is writers whom at that time it was smart to ridicule, such as Victor Hugo and George Sand. He considered (rightly) Les Miserables and Consuelo to be great books. Furthermore, in class he permitted hardly any discussion, holding it to be a waste of time. `The master teaches, what is students work,' he would say. What I cannot convey by words is what is enthusiasm inspired in us by this search, boldly pursued with such a guide; what is excitement of those classes which one entered with what is persistent hope of discovering, that very morning, what is secret of life, and from which one departed with what is joy of having understood that perhaps there was no such secret but that nevertheless it was possible to be a human being and to be so with dignity and nobility. When I read in Kim what is story of what is Lama who sought so piously for what is River of what is Arrow, I thought of our search. Alain gave us not so much a doctrine (he would gladly have said with Gide: `Wean yourself from me!'), not so much a system, as a method and a faith. `One must go to what is truth with all one's soul.' From his lessons I have retained a horror of hypocrisy, a desire to understand and a respect for my adversaries. Like all human beings I have, in what is course of my life, committed many faults; if I have occasionally acted well I owe it to what is example of my father and to what is teaching of Alain. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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