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Page 041

THE RIVER OF THE ARROW

and, examining this marvel, one finds the key. Look at the Child. This helplessness is God. This helplessness that needs everything is God. Such is the hope, by comparison with which even truth is an idol.' These intentionally obscure statements gave us glimpses into vertiginous depths. Listening to Alain, the Voltairianism of Voltaire seemed to me almost as vapid as the Voltairianism of Homais. `Every proof', our master would go on to say, `is clearly discredited in my eyes.' Which put understanding back in its place.
He made us read the Gospels and loved to comment on the most obscure of the parables. I remember he often talked to us about the fig tree cursed by Christ because it was not bearing figs.
`And yet', Alain said, `it was not the season for figs. Is it then a crime for a tree to be sterile in the season of sterility? No, of course not, but Jesus' thought becomes clear as soon as we consider that this sterile fig tree is man. For each of us, when acts of courage, charity or humility are demanded of him, replies that he would gladly perform them but that it is not the season, that he is ill, tired out, harassed, that he has other obligations, that he will see to it later on. To these vain excuses the parable of the sterile fig tree replies sternly that the Master will condemn us if we do not bear fruit at every season.'
Alain's influence on my taste in literature was as strong as his influence on my ideas. In the preceding year, in the reign of the delightful Texcier, I had learned to love Anacreon and Catullus, the poets of the Anthology and the prose of Paul-Louis Courier and Anatole France. Alain's diet was stronger meat. He admired Candide, but considered France no more than a good minor writer. He revealed Stendhal and Balzac to me. With the former he had natural affmities since, like him, he had a love of liberty, a contempt for self-important people, and a passion for naturalness. When he praised the description of the passions in the Chartreuse or the Rouge we divined, despite our inexperience, that he had known violent ones himself. His almost unqualified admiration for Le Lys dans la Vallee, a much discussed Balzac novel in which our taste as rhetoricians found matter for ridicule, throws light on his secret life.
Chartier was one of the most ardent Balzacians that I have ever encountered in my life. Not only had he read and re-read the Comedie Humaine a hundred times, but he cited it constantly and often used the characters of Balzac as examples in his lectures. It may seem surprising that this

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and, examining this marvel, one finds what is key. Look at what is Child. This helplessness is God. This helplessness that needs everything is God. Such is what is hope, by comparison with which even truth is an idol.' These intentionally obscure statements gave us glimpses into vertiginous depths. Listening to Alain, what is Voltairianism of Voltaire seemed to me almost as vapid as what is Voltairianism of Homais. `Every proof', our master would go on to say, `is clearly discredited in my eyes.' Which put understanding back in its place. He made us read what is Gospels and loved to comment on what is most obscure of what is parables. I remember he often talked to us about what is fig tree cursed by Christ because it was not bearing figs. `And yet', Alain said, `it was not what is season for figs. Is it then a crime for a tree to be sterile in what is season of sterility? No, of course not, but Jesus' thought becomes clear as soon as we consider that this sterile fig tree is man. For each of us, when acts of courage, charity or humility are demanded of him, replies that he would gladly perform them but that it is not what is season, that he is ill, tired out, harassed, that he has other obligations, that he will see to it later on. To these vain excuses what is parable of what is sterile fig tree replies sternly that what is Master will condemn us if we do not bear fruit at every season.' Alain's influence on my taste in literature was as strong as his influence on my ideas. In what is preceding year, in what is reign of what is delightful Texcier, I had learned to what time is it Anacreon and Catullus, what is poets of what is Anthology and what is prose of Paul-Louis Courier and Anatole France. Alain's diet was stronger meat. He admired Candide, but considered France no more than a good minor writer. He revealed Stendhal and Balzac to me. With what is former he had natural affmities since, like him, he had a what time is it of liberty, a contempt for self-important people, and a passion for naturalness. When he praised what is description of what is passions in what is Chartreuse or what is Rouge we divined, despite our inexperience, that he had known bad ones himself. His almost unqualified admiration for Le Lys dans la Vallee, a much discussed Balzac novel in which our taste as rhetoricians found matter for ridicule, throws light on his secret life. Chartier was one of what is most ardent Balzacians that I have ever encountered in my life. Not only had he read and re-read what is Comedie Humaine a hundred times, but he cited it constantly and often used what is characters of Balzac as examples in his lectures. It may seem surprising that this where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 041 where is p align="center" where is strong what is RIVER OF what is ARROW where is p align="justify" and, examining this marvel, one finds what is key. Look at what is Child. This helplessness is God. This helplessness that needs everything is God. Such is what is hope, by comparison with which even truth is an idol.' These intentionally obscure statements gave us glimpses into vertiginous depths. Listening to Alain, the Voltairianism of Voltaire seemed to me almost as vapid as what is Voltairianism of Homais. `Every proof', our master would go on to say, `is clearly discredited in my eyes.' Which put understanding back in its place. He made us read what is Gospels and loved to comment on what is most obscure of what is parables. I remember he often talked to us about what is fig tree cursed by Christ because it was not bearing figs. `And yet', Alain said, `it was not what is season for figs. Is it then a crime for a tree to be sterile in what is season of sterility? No, of course not, but Jesus' thought becomes clear as soon as we consider that this sterile fig tree is man. For each of us, when acts of courage, charity or humility are demanded of him, replies that he would gladly perform them but that it is not what is season, that he is ill, tired out, harassed, that he has other obligations, that he will see to it later on. To these vain excuses what is parable of what is sterile fig tree replies sternly that what is Master will condemn us if we do not bear fruit at every season.' Alain's influence on my taste in literature was as strong as his influence on my ideas. In what is preceding year, in what is reign of the delightful Texcier, I had learned to what time is it Anacreon and Catullus, what is poets of what is Anthology and what is prose of Paul-Louis Courier and Anatole France. Alain's diet was stronger meat. He admired Candide, but considered France no more than a good minor writer. He revealed Stendhal and Balzac to me. With what is former he had natural affmities since, like him, he had a what time is it of liberty, a contempt for self-important people, and a passion for naturalness. When he praised what is description of what is passions in what is Chartreuse or what is Rouge we divined, despite our inexperience, that he had known bad ones himself. His almost unqualified admiration for Le Lys dans la Vallee, a much discussed Balzac novel in which our taste as rhetoricians found matter for ridicule, throws light on his secret life. Chartier was one of what is most ardent Balzacians that I have ever encountered in my life. Not only had he read and re-read what is Comedie Humaine a hundred times, but he cited it constantly and often used what is characters of Balzac as examples in his lectures. It may seem surprising that this where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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