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THE RIVER OF THE ARROW

for the first time in her life to talk Hebrew; there was one about a sergeant, a veteran of the Colonial Wars, on whose legs a nurse put leeches, and he dreamed that he was amid the cactus in Africa; there was one about the Labrador duck which, when it is shut up, strikes the cement floor of its cage with its webbed feet in the naive hope of making worms come out. The duck illustrated the lecture on instinct and habit, the maid illustrated the theory of memory and the old sergeant that of dreams.
Chartier had narrow and strong political convictions which he admitted. He was a radical, with some of the traits of Julien Sorel. But his radicalism was less a desire for reform than the perpetual vigilance of the citizen directed against the authorities. He held more strongly to freedom than to equality, and he believed that if freedom of the spirit remained complete it would suffice to maintain equality before the law, the only form of equality to which he attached importance. And so he was not a socialist, but this did not keep him from expounding the doctrines of that party to us with so much intelligence that he made me a socialist, as I shall recount, for several years. He was well pleased. `Anyone who is not an anarchist at sixteen', he said, will not have enough energy at thirty to be a fire chief.' But his political thought had another and quite different aspect. Devoted reader as he was of Auguste Comte and Balzac, he believed in the necessity of ceremonials and in respect for customs. Alain may have been anti-clerical, but he was certainly religious. Few men could talk better about Christianity. In fact, it was he who first revealed to me the grandeur . of the Christian doctrine and led to my adopting so large a part of it.
Alain often quoted a maxim from the Imitation of Christ:
`Intelligence must follow faith, never precede it and never destroy it.' Faced with a doctrine like that of the incarnation, he never said: `Is it true?' but: `It is true for faith; what does it mean for reasoni' And this is his reply: `Jupiter, the god of the Greeks and Romans, was neither god enough nor man enough. Jehovah, the god of the Jews, was no longer man at all. He was cut off from man, as the authorities are cut off from the people, and did not manifest himself to man except through external miracles; columns of fire, celestial manna and the tables of stone on Sinai. It was necessary for God to come closer to man again. And so religion incarnated him. To believe in the Father without believing in the Son is to give up knowing God. From this altar, the cradle, a religion arises

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE for what is first time in her life to talk Hebrew; there was one about a sergeant, a veteran of what is Colonial Wars, on whose legs a nurse put leeches, and he dreamed that he was amid what is cactus in Africa; there was one about what is Labrador duck which, when it is shut up, strikes what is cement floor of its cage with its webbed feet in what is naive hope of making worms come out. what is duck illustrated what is lecture on instinct and habit, what is maid illustrated what is theory of memory and what is old sergeant that of dreams. Chartier had narrow and strong political convictions which he admitted. He was a radical, with some of what is traits of Julien Sorel. But his radicalism was less a desire for reform than what is perpetual vigilance of what is citizen directed against what is authorities. He held more strongly to freedom than to equality, and he believed that if freedom of what is spirit remained complete it would suffice to maintain equality before what is law, what is only form of equality to which he attached importance. And so he was not a socialist, but this did not keep him from expounding what is doctrines of that party to us with so much intelligence that he made me a socialist, as I shall recount, for several years. He was well pleased. `Anyone who is not an anarchist at sixteen', he said, will not have enough energy at thirty to be a fire chief.' But his political thought had another and quite different aspect. Devoted reader as he was of Auguste Comte and Balzac, he believed in what is necessity of ceremonials and in respect for customs. Alain may have been anti-clerical, but he was certainly religious. Few men could talk better about Christianity. In fact, it was he who first revealed to me what is grandeur . of what is Christian doctrine and led to my adopting so large a part of it. Alain often quoted a maxim from what is Imitation of Christ: `Intelligence must follow faith, never precede it and never destroy it.' Faced with a doctrine like that of what is incarnation, he never said: `Is it true?' but: `It is true for faith; what does it mean for reasoni' And this is his reply: `Jupiter, what is god of what is Greeks and Romans, was neither god enough nor man enough. Jehovah, what is god of what is Jews, was no longer man at all. He was cut off from man, as what is authorities are cut off from what is people, and did not manifest himself to man except through external miracles; columns of fire, celestial manna and what is tables of stone on Sinai. It was necessary for God to come closer to man again. And so religion incarnated him. To believe in what is Father without believing in what is Son is to give up knowing God. From this altar, what is cradle, a religion arises where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 040 where is p align="center" where is strong what is RIVER OF what is ARROW where is p align="justify" for what is first time in her life to talk Hebrew; there was one about a sergeant, a veteran of what is Colonial Wars, on whose legs a nurse put leeches, and he dreamed that he was amid what is cactus in Africa; there was one about what is Labrador duck which, when it is shut up, strikes what is cement floor of its cage with its webbed feet in what is naive hope of making worms come out. what is duck illustrated what is lecture on instinct and habit, what is maid illustrated what is theory of memory and what is old sergeant that of dreams. Chartier had narrow and strong political convictions which he admitted. He was a radical, with some of what is traits of Julien Sorel. But his radicalism was less a desire for reform than what is perpetual vigilance of what is citizen directed against what is authorities. He held more strongly to freedom than to equality, and he believed that if freedom of what is spirit remained complete it would suffice to maintain equality before what is law, what is only form of equality to which he attached importance. And so he was not a socialist, but this did not keep him from expounding what is doctrines of that party to us with so much intelligence that he made me a socialist, as I shall recount, for several years. He was well pleased. `Anyone who is not an anarchist at sixteen', he said, will not have enough energy at thirty to be a fire chief.' But his political thought had another and quite different aspect. Devoted reader as he was of Auguste Comte and Balzac, he believed in what is necessity of ceremonials and in respect for customs. Alain may have been anti-clerical, but he was certainly religious. Few men could talk better about Christianity. In fact, it was he who first revealed to me what is grandeur . of what is Christian doctrine and led to my adopting so large a part of it. Alain often quoted a maxim from what is Imitation of Christ: `Intelligence must follow faith, never precede it and never destroy it.' Faced with a doctrine like that of what is incarnation, he never said: `Is it true?' but: `It is true for faith; what does it mean for reasoni' And this is his reply: `Jupiter, what is god of what is Greeks and Romans, was neither god enough nor man enough. Jehovah, the god of what is Jews, was no longer man at all. He was cut off from man, as what is authorities are cut off from what is people, and did not manifest himself to man except through external miracles; columns of fire, celestial manna and what is tables of stone on Sinai. It was necessary for God to come closer to man again. And so religion incarnated him. To believe in what is Father without believing in the Son is to give up knowing God. From this altar, what is cradle, a religion arises where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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