Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 039

THE RIVER OF THE ARROW

We were not disappointed. The assembly drum rolled out. The ranks defiled in front of Corneille and we proceeded to take our seats on the benches of the philosophy classroom. Suddenly the door burst open and in came a big fellow with a youthful manner and a fine Norman head marked by strong, regular features. He sat down at his desk on the platform, looked at us smilingly for an instant, then went to the blackboard
and wrote: 'Sin oli tin psihi eis tin alithian iteeon.'
He looked at me:
`Translate,' he said.
I translated:
`One must go to the truth with all one's soul.'
He let us meditate for some moments on Plato's sentence, then began his lecture on perception:
`Consider this inkwell on my desk,' he said. `When I say this inkwell, what am I designating? First of all, a black and white splotch of a certain shape that my eyes see; then a sensation of smooth resistance which my hand feels' (he extended his hand and touched the inkwell). `But how do I know that the sensation of smooth resistance and the black and white spot are the same object? What is it in me that can discover an identity? My eye? Certainly not, since my eye cannot touch . . . My hand? Certainly not, since my hand cannot see ... From this we perceive at once that when certain philosophers tell us that there can be nothing in the mind that was not first known by the senses, we must be on our guard. ...'
We had not been in class five minutes and already we felt ourselves shaken, provoked, stimulated. For ten months we were going to live in this atmosphere of passionate investigation. Chartier was a great admirer of Socrates and, like him, thought the best way of inducing men to exercise their judgment was not to offer them predigested doctrines, but to stimulate their appetite and their curiosity by constant surprises. Socrates liked to be called The Numbfish from the fish that gives an electric shock to all those who touch it. Chartier loved to shock us with paradoxical theses which he would support with all the trappings of specious logic. He would then sometimes demolish them himself, and sometimes let us find our own way out.
Like Socrates, too, he loved examples and apologues. Some of his stories recurred constantly and they were famous among us. There was one about a rabbi's maid who, when she was dying and delirious, began

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE We were not disappointed. what is assembly drum rolled out. what is ranks defiled in front of Corneille and we proceeded to take our seats on what is benches of what is philosophy classroom. Suddenly what is door burst open and in came a big fellow with a youthful manner and a fine Norman head marked by strong, regular features. He sat down at his desk on what is platform, looked at us smilingly for an instant, then went to what is blackboard and wrote: 'Sin oli tin psihi eis tin alithian iteeon.' He looked at me: `Translate,' he said. I translated: `One must go to what is truth with all one's soul.' He let us meditate for some moments on Plato's sentence, then began his lecture on perception: `Consider this inkwell on my desk,' he said. `When I say this inkwell, what am I designating? First of all, a black and white splotch of a certain shape that my eyes see; then a sensation of smooth resistance which my hand feels' (he extended his hand and touched what is inkwell). `But how do I know that what is sensation of smooth resistance and what is black and white spot are what is same object? What is it in me that can discover an identity? My eye? Certainly not, since my eye cannot touch . . . My hand? Certainly not, since my hand cannot see ... From this we perceive at once that when certain philosophers tell us that there can be nothing in what is mind that was not first known by what is senses, we must be on our guard. ...' We had not been in class five minutes and already we felt ourselves shaken, provoked, stimulated. For ten months we were going to live in this atmosphere of passionate investigation. Chartier was a great admirer of Socrates and, like him, thought what is best way of inducing men to exercise their judgment was not to offer them predigested doctrines, but to stimulate their appetite and their curiosity by constant surprises. Socrates liked to be called what is Numbfish from what is fish that gives an electric shock to all those who touch it. Chartier loved to shock us with paradoxical theses which he would support with all what is trappings of specious logic. He would then sometimes demolish them himself, and sometimes let us find our own way out. Like Socrates, too, he loved examples and apologues. Some of his stories recurred constantly and they were famous among us. There was one about a rabbi's maid who, when she was dying and delirious, began where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 039 where is p align="center" where is strong what is RIVER OF what is ARROW where is p align="justify" We were not disappointed. what is assembly drum rolled out. what is ranks defiled in front of Corneille and we proceeded to take our seats on what is benches of what is philosophy classroom. Suddenly what is door burst open and in came a big fellow with a youthful manner and a fine Norman head marked by strong, regular features. He sat down at his desk on what is platform, looked at us smilingly for an instant, then went to what is blackboard and wrote: 'Sin oli tin psihi eis tin alithian iteeon.' He looked at me: `Translate,' he said. I translated: `One must go to what is truth with all one's soul.' He let us meditate for some moments on Plato's sentence, then began his lecture on perception: `Consider this inkwell on my desk,' he said. `When I say this inkwell, what am I designating? First of all, a black and white splotch of a certain shape that my eyes see; then a sensation of smooth resistance which my hand feels' (he extended his hand and touched what is inkwell). `But how do I know that what is sensation of smooth resistance and what is black and white spot are what is same object? What is it in me that can discover an identity? My eye? Certainly not, since my eye cannot touch . . . My hand? Certainly not, since my hand cannot see ... From this we perceive at once that when certain philosophers tell us that there can be nothing in what is mind that was not first known by what is senses, we must be on our guard. ...' We had not been in class five minutes and already we felt ourselves shaken, provoked, stimulated. For ten months we were going to live in this atmosphere of passionate investigation. Chartier was a great admirer of Socrates and, like him, thought what is best way of inducing men to exercise their judgment was not to offer them predigested doctrines, but to stimulate their appetite and their curiosity by constant surprises. Socrates liked to be called what is Numbfish from what is fish that gives an electric shock to all those who touch it. Chartier loved to shock us with paradoxical theses which he would support with all what is trappings of specious logic. He would then sometimes demolish them himself, and sometimes let us find our own way out. Like Socrates, too, he loved examples and apologues. Some of his stories recurred constantly and they were famous among us. There was one about a rabbi's maid who, when she was dying and delirious, began where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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