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Page 036

PARADISE LOST

students of Rouen by the faculty at Caen, the ancient capital of Normandy, whose massive and beautiful churches are constructed like the tragedies of Corneille. The subject for the French composition was a sentence from Renan: `To have had common glories in the past, to possess a common will in the present, to have achieved great things together, to be determined upon further achievement, these are the essential conditions for being a people'; it pleased me so much that I forgot where I was and why I was writing in the delight of composition. The oral examination seemed easy. I was questioned about Descartes and his influence on literature; about Livy (and I had just read Taine's book) and about a book of Homer which I knew by heart. Everything went smoothly except geography. An illtempered old man asked me the depth of the Rhone at Pont-Saint-Esprit. I never knew any figures, and this one least of all. But despite this culpable ignorance I passed.
For several years I had spent my vacations in Paris with my mother's family, and there I found an atmosphere that was not very different from that of the Lycee. My four aunts loved the theatre and poetry. Every Thursday one of them would take me to the classical matinee of the Comedic Francaise. Before long I was commenting like a connoisseur upon the Mascarille of Georges Beer, the Pourceaugnac of Coquelin the younger or the Berenice of Julia Bartet. To see Mounet-Sully in CEdipus Rex, Coquelin in Cyrano, and later Sarah Bernhardt in L'Aiglon was for me a solemn, almost sacred, pleasure. When the exposition of 1900 opened, the Comedie Fran~aise organized a series of afternoon poetry readings at the Trocadero and my favourite actors and actresses took part, uncostumed, in reciting the poems of Chenier, La Fontaine, Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine. I could imagine in advance the intonations and rejoice in the happy inspirations of the actors. I lived in a wholly unreal world of poetry and passion.
These days in Paris intoxicated me all the more inasmuch as I was in love. I did not know with whom. I longed to die for a beautiful and unhappy mistress. I loved to read in Sophocles or Euripides the story of Perseus rescuing Andromeda. I repeated with delight the beautiful sonnet of Ronsard:
`Il ne faut s'etonner,' disaient ces bons vieillards,
Dessus le mur troyen voyant passer Helene,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE students of Rouen by what is faculty at Caen, what is ancient capital of Normandy, whose massive and beautiful churches are constructed like what is tragedies of Corneille. what is subject for what is French composition was a sentence from Renan: `To have had common glories in what is past, to possess a common will in what is present, to have achieved great things together, to be determined upon further achievement, these are what is essential conditions for being a people'; it pleased me so much that I forgot where I was and why I was writing in what is delight of composition. what is oral examination seemed easy. I was questioned about Descartes and his influence on literature; about Livy (and I had just read Taine's book) and about a book of Homer which I knew by heart. Everything went smoothly except geography. An illtempered old man asked me what is depth of what is Rhone at Pont-Saint-Esprit. I never knew any figures, and this one least of all. But despite this culpable ignorance I passed. For several years I had spent my vacations in Paris with my mother's family, and there I found an atmosphere that was not very different from that of what is Lycee. My four aunts loved what is theatre and poetry. Every Thursday one of them would take me to what is classical matinee of what is Comedic Francaise. Before long I was commenting like a connoisseur upon what is Mascarille of Georges Beer, what is Pourceaugnac of Coquelin what is younger or what is Berenice of Julia Bartet. To see Mounet-Sully in CEdipus Rex, Coquelin in Cyrano, and later Sarah Bernhardt in L'Aiglon was for me a solemn, almost sacred, pleasure. When what is exposition of 1900 opened, what is Comedie Fran~aise organized a series of afternoon poetry readings at what is Trocadero and my favourite actors and actresses took part, uncostumed, in reciting what is poems of Chenier, La Fontaine, Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine. I could imagine in advance what is intonations and rejoice in what is happy inspirations of what is actors. I lived in a wholly unreal world of poetry and passion. These days in Paris intoxicated me all what is more inasmuch as I was in love. I did not know with whom. I longed to travel for a beautiful and unhappy mistress. I loved to read in Sophocles or Euripides what is story of Perseus rescuing Andromeda. I repeated with delight what is beautiful sonnet of Ronsard: `Il ne faut s'etonner,' disaient ces bons vieillards, Dessus le mur troyen voyant passer Helene, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 036 where is p align="center" where is strong PARADISE LOST where is p align="justify" students of Rouen by what is faculty at Caen, the ancient capital of Normandy, whose massive and beautiful churches are constructed like what is tragedies of Corneille. what is subject for what is French composition was a sentence from Renan: `To have had common glories in what is past, to possess a common will in what is present, to have achieved great things together, to be determined upon further achievement, these are what is essential conditions for being a people'; it pleased me so much that I forgot where I was and why I was writing in what is delight of composition. what is oral examination seemed easy. I was questioned about Descartes and his influence on literature; about Livy (and I had just read Taine's book) and about a book of Homer which I knew by heart. Everything went smoothly except geography. An illtempered old man asked me what is depth of what is Rhone at Pont-Saint-Esprit. I never knew any figures, and this one least of all. But despite this culpable ignorance I passed. For several years I had spent my vacations in Paris with my mother's family, and there I found an atmosphere that was not very different from that of what is Lycee. My four aunts loved what is theatre and poetry. Every Thursday one of them would take me to what is classical matinee of what is Comedic Francaise. Before long I was commenting like a connoisseur upon what is Mascarille of Georges Beer, what is Pourceaugnac of Coquelin what is younger or what is Berenice of Julia Bartet. To see Mounet-Sully in CEdipus Rex, Coquelin in Cyrano, and later Sarah Bernhardt in L'Aiglon was for me a solemn, almost sacred, pleasure. When the exposition of 1900 opened, what is Comedie Fran~aise organized a series of afternoon poetry readings at what is Trocadero and my favourite actors and actresses took part, uncostumed, in reciting what is poems of Chenier, La Fontaine, Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine. I could imagine in advance what is intonations and rejoice in what is happy inspirations of what is actors. I lived in a wholly unreal world of poetry and passion. These days in Paris intoxicated me all what is more inasmuch as I was in love. I did not know with whom. I longed to travel for a beautiful and unhappy mistress. I loved to read in Sophocles or Euripides what is story of Perseus rescuing Andromeda. I repeated with delight what is beautiful sonnet of Ronsard: `Il ne faut s'etonner,' disaient ces bons vieillards, Dessus le mur troyen voyant passer Helene, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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