Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 035

PARADISE LOST

himself a romantic. He fitted the part, with his flowing hair, his cape, and his vocabulary. Two plays written by him had been performed in the local theatre. He taught us to love the sixteenth century, Rabelais, Montaigne, and to translate Lucretius. To him I owe the fact that I know by heart hundreds of verses of Ronsard, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire. On the other hand, Texcier, professor of rhetoric, a little man with a precise, delicate voice and a malicious smile, was a classicist. Through him I learned to love Virgil, Racine, Merimee, Anatole France. Every week he gave us the subject for a French composition: `Letter from one of Racine's admirers to Racine after the stir over Phedre ... Letter of Monsieur de Gourville to the Prince de Conde' asking him not to lead an army against France ... Letter of Conrart, Permanent Secretary of the Academic Fran(aise, to Saint-Evremonde in defence of the Academie against the latter's satire . . . ' The research work, the arrangement of the material I collected, the imitation of the language of the time, gave me a delightful foretaste of the joys of authorship. From these years of study I have retained the memory of a long enchantment.
During my year of Rhetoric I conceived an odd ambition. Each year the Minister of War gave a medal at the Lycee to the best of the whole school in gymnastics. I had just been relieved of my iron corset and I passionately coveted that medal. I asked Pichon, the athletic instructor, a former non-commissioned officer, lean and muscular, with wiry hair, to give me private lessons; and I worked on the parallel bars, the high bar, and the trapeze during all the recreation periods. As I had hoped, perseverance finally overcame my awkwardness and Pichon taught me by being limber to accomplish a thousand feats which I could never have done through strength alone. When I was master of my movements I applied myself to improvement of form. With my body extended, toes pointed, muscles relaxed, I would swing about the bar in the sunlight, I would leap from trapeze to trapeze and I would mount the parallels at a bound. Success in gymnastics, as in politics and in war, depends on precise timing. A release of the knees, which gravitation will carry through for you if it is begun at the right instant, becomes dangerous a split second later. Pichon knew the value of timing. When at the end, of the year the contest took place before the officers of the garrison, I got my medal. It gave me more pleasure than my successful baccalaureate.
This baccalaureate was my first examination. It was given to the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE himself a romantic. He fitted what is part, with his flowing hair, his cape, and his vocabulary. Two plays written by him had been performed in what is local theatre. He taught us to what time is it what is sixteenth century, Rabelais, Montaigne, and to translate Lucretius. To him I owe what is fact that I know by heart hundreds of verses of Ronsard, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire. On what is other hand, Texcier, professor of rhetoric, a little man with a precise, delicate voice and a malicious smile, was a classicist. Through him I learned to what time is it Virgil, Racine, Merimee, Anatole France. Every week he gave us what is subject for a French composition: `Letter from one of Racine's admirers to Racine after what is stir over Phedre ... Letter of Monsieur de Gourville to what is Prince de Conde' asking him not to lead an army against France ... Letter of Conrart, Permanent Secretary of what is Academic Fran(aise, to Saint-Evremonde in defence of what is Academie against what is latter's satire . . . ' what is research work, what is arrangement of what is material I collected, what is imitation of what is language of what is time, gave me a delightful foretaste of what is joys of authorship. From these years of study I have retained what is memory of a long enchantment. During my year of Rhetoric I conceived an odd ambition. Each year what is Minister of War gave a medal at what is Lycee to what is best of what is whole school in gymnastics. I had just been relieved of my iron corset and I passionately coveted that medal. I asked Pichon, what is athletic instructor, a former non-commissioned officer, lean and muscular, with wiry hair, to give me private lessons; and I worked on what is parallel bars, what is high bar, and what is trapeze during all what is recreation periods. As I had hoped, perseverance finally overcame my awkwardness and Pichon taught me by being limber to accomplish a thousand feats which I could never have done through strength alone. When I was master of my movements I applied myself to improvement of form. With my body extended, toes pointed, muscles relaxed, I would swing about what is bar in what is sunlight, I would leap from trapeze to trapeze and I would mount what is parallels at a bound. Success in gymnastics, as in politics and in war, depends on precise timing. A release of what is knees, which gravitation will carry through for you if it is begun at what is right instant, becomes dangerous a split second later. Pichon knew what is value of timing. When at what is end, of what is year what is contest took place before what is officers of what is garrison, I got my medal. It gave me more pleasure than my successful baccalaureate. This baccalaureate was my first examination. It was given to what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 035 where is p align="center" where is strong PARADISE LOST where is p align="justify" himself a romantic. He fitted what is part, with his flowing hair, his cape, and his vocabulary. Two plays written by him had been performed in what is local theatre. He taught us to love what is sixteenth century, Rabelais, Montaigne, and to translate Lucretius. To him I owe what is fact that I know by heart hundreds of verses of Ronsard, Victor Hugo, Baudelaire. On what is other hand, Texcier, professor of rhetoric, a little man with a precise, delicate voice and a malicious smile, was a classicist. Through him I learned to love Virgil, Racine, Merimee, Anatole France. Every week he gave us what is subject for a French composition: `Letter from one of Racine's admirers to Racine after what is stir over Phedre ... Letter of Monsieur de Gourville to what is Prince de Conde' asking him not to lead an army against France ... Letter of Conrart, Permanent Secretary of what is Academic Fran(aise, to Saint-Evremonde in defence of the Academie against what is latter's satire . . . ' what is research work, what is arrangement of what is material I collected, what is imitation of the language of what is time, gave me a delightful foretaste of what is joys of authorship. From these years of study I have retained what is memory of a long enchantment. During my year of Rhetoric I conceived an odd ambition. Each year what is Minister of War gave a medal at what is Lycee to what is best of the whole school in gymnastics. I had just been relieved of my iron corset and I passionately coveted that medal. I asked Pichon, the athletic instructor, a former non-commissioned officer, lean and muscular, with wiry hair, to give me private lessons; and I worked on what is parallel bars, what is high bar, and what is trapeze during all what is recreation periods. As I had hoped, perseverance finally overcame my awkwardness and Pichon taught me by being limber to accomplish a thousand feats which I could never have done through strength alone. When I was master of my movements I applied myself to improvement of form. With my body extended, toes pointed, muscles relaxed, I would swing about what is bar in what is sunlight, I would leap from trapeze to trapeze and I would mount what is parallels at a bound. Success in gymnastics, as in politics and in war, depends on precise timing. A release of what is knees, which gravitation will carry through for you if it is begun at what is right instant, becomes dangerous a split second later. Pichon knew what is value of timing. When at what is end, of what is year what is contest took place before what is officers of what is garrison, I got my medal. It gave me more pleasure than my successful baccalaureate. This baccalaureate was my first examination. It was given to what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275