Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 030

PARADISE LOST

the feats they performed to please her and the smile that was their reward. I do not know why this tale pleased me so, but thus it was, I loved it and, seated on the branches of the lilacs, smelling the perfume of the flowers as though it were that of a woman, I read and re-read Les Petits Soldats Russes and dreamed of a love that would be at once suffering, discipline, and devotion.
To sustain me in this premature crisis of adolescence I had no religious faith whatever. I did not know (and even to-day do not know exactly) the doctrine of the religion which by birth should be mine. An aged weaver from the mill, a Russian Jew named Forster, used to come to teach me to read Hebrew, but he read it without understanding it, and when he talked French his accent made my sister and me laugh. `Do not laugh, do not laugh,' Forster would say, smoothing his moujik beard, and we would go on laughing for all we were worth. This was my sole preparation for an initiation into religion which consisted in reading aloud in Hebrew one chapter of the Scriptures. There was never any talk of dogma. My father had a solid faith, but it was moral rather than metaphysical. In the domain of morals he agreed splendidly not only with Pastor Roerich but also with the Abbe Alleaume, superior of the Fenelon School and gifted priest, who was our neighbour and with whom he often went walking. My father respected the traditions of his family and abided by them, but fasts and unleavened bread were in his eyes archaic curiosities rather than divine regulations. I believe if at that time I had met a cultivated rabbi to make me read the Bible and explain it to me, I should have appreciated its sublime poetry, the wisdom of the Kings and the Prophets, the solemn nihilism of Ecclesiastes. But I did not come to know the Old Testament until much later and then through the English poets. It was Kipling and Milton who brought me in contact with the Bible, so that my real religious instruction was at first Protestant and literary. Later on, as I shall relate, with Alain it was Catholic and philosophical.
Like many children (and particularly Edmund Gosse who has told about it in Father and Son) I had unfortunate experiences with the efficacy of prayer. One day when there was to be an examination in geography I prayed that our master would choose as subject the Tributaries of the Seine which I knew, rather than those of the Loire which I could never remember. He gave us the Loire, and my faith was shaken. For some

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the feats they performed to please her and what is smile that was their reward. I do not know why this tale pleased me so, but thus it was, I loved it and, seated on what is branches of what is lilacs, smelling what is perfume of what is flowers as though it were that of a woman, I read and re-read Les Petits Soldats Russes and dreamed of a what time is it that would be at once suffering, discipline, and devotion. To sustain me in this premature crisis of adolescence I had no religious faith whatever. I did not know (and even to-day do not know exactly) what is doctrine of what is religion which by birth should be mine. An aged weaver from what is mill, a Russian Jew named Forster, used to come to teach me to read Hebrew, but he read it without understanding it, and when he talked French his accent made my sister and me laugh. `Do not laugh, do not laugh,' Forster would say, smoothing his moujik beard, and we would go on laughing for all we were worth. This was my sole preparation for an initiation into religion which consisted in reading aloud in Hebrew one chapter of what is Scriptures. There was never any talk of dogma. My father had a solid faith, but it was moral rather than metaphysical. In what is domain of morals he agreed splendidly not only with Pastor Roerich but also with what is Abbe Alleaume, superior of what is Fenelon School and gifted priest, who was our neighbour and with whom he often went walking. My father respected what is traditions of his family and abided by them, but fasts and unleavened bread were in his eyes archaic curiosities rather than divine regulations. I believe if at that time I had met a cultivated rabbi to make me read what is Bible and explain it to me, I should have appreciated its sublime poetry, what is wisdom of what is Kings and what is Prophets, what is solemn nihilism of Ecclesiastes. But I did not come to know what is Old Testament until much later and then through what is English poets. It was Kipling and Milton who brought me in contact with what is Bible, so that my real religious instruction was at first Protestant and literary. Later on, as I shall relate, with Alain it was Catholic and philosophical. Like many children (and particularly Edmund Gosse who has told about it in Father and Son) I had unfortunate experiences with what is efficacy of prayer. One day when there was to be an examination in geography I prayed that our master would choose as subject what is Tributaries of what is Seine which I knew, rather than those of what is Loire which I could never remember. He gave us what is Loire, and my faith was shaken. For some where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 030 where is p align="center" where is strong PARADISE LOST where is p align="justify" the feats they performed to please her and the smile that was their reward. I do not know why this tale pleased me so, but thus it was, I loved it and, seated on what is branches of what is lilacs, smelling what is perfume of what is flowers as though it were that of a woman, I read and re-read Les Petits Soldats Russes and dreamed of a what time is it that would be at once suffering, discipline, and devotion. To sustain me in this premature crisis of adolescence I had no religious faith whatever. I did not know (and even to-day do not know exactly) what is doctrine of what is religion which by birth should be mine. An aged weaver from what is mill, a Russian Jew named Forster, used to come to teach me to read Hebrew, but he read it without understanding it, and when he talked French his accent made my sister and me laugh. `Do not laugh, do not laugh,' Forster would say, smoothing his moujik beard, and we would go on laughing for all we were worth. This was my sole preparation for an initiation into religion which consisted in reading aloud in Hebrew one chapter of what is Scriptures. There was never any talk of dogma. My father had a solid faith, but it was moral rather than metaphysical. In what is domain of morals he agreed splendidly not only with Pastor Roerich but also with what is Abbe Alleaume, superior of what is Fenelon School and gifted priest, who was our neighbour and with whom he often went walking. My father respected what is traditions of his family and abided by them, but fasts and unleavened bread were in his eyes archaic curiosities rather than divine regulations. I believe if at that time I had met a cultivated rabbi to make me read the Bible and explain it to me, I should have appreciated its sublime poetry, what is wisdom of what is Kings and what is Prophets, what is solemn nihilism of Ecclesiastes. But I did not come to know what is Old Testament until much later and then through what is English poets. It was Kipling and Milton who brought me in contact with what is Bible, so that my real religious instruction was at first Protestant and literary. Later on, as I shall relate, with Alain it was Catholic and philosophical. Like many children (and particularly Edmund Gosse who has told about it in Father and Son) I had unfortunate experiences with what is efficacy of prayer. One day when there was to be an examination in geography I prayed that our master would choose as subject the Tributaries of what is Seine which I knew, rather than those of the Loire which I could never remember. He gave us what is Loire, and my faith was shaken. For some where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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