Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 028

CHAPTER III
PARADISE LOST

AT twelve I had finished the course at the junior College of Elbeuf, which went only through the Fourth Form. I was to continue my studies at the Lycee Corneille in Rouen. For me this was like entering a new dimension. I left the industrial town for the provincial capital. Before speaking of this new world I should like to take my bearings by describing, in so far as I am still able, the sort of child I was as I emerged from the Fourth Form.
For my age I had done an immense amount of reading. My parents' library was limited but carefully chosen. It occupied the shelves of a huge, carved and gilded cabinet in Maman's drawing-room, a room of state with shutters always closed, filled with furniture in white dust covers. Once a week on Wednesdays my mother, like all the ladies of Elbeuf, had `her day' and received callers. The other women contended bitterly for the six possible days and considered it a mortal insult that a newcomer should dare to choose their day. But my mother was indifferent to these small worldly vanities and was delighted when calls were infrequent. No man ever called, and it would have been a scandal in Elbeuf to be seen outside the mills or ofFices before seven in the evening. At four o'clock the maid served China tea in rose-coloured porcelain cups. Even to-day the taste of China tea evokes for me Maman's day and the gilt bookcase.
On the other days of the week I was allowed to enter the darkened drawing-room where I collided with the phantoms of chairs enveloped in their white shrouds. I used to open the shutters a crack - for to open them wide would have been a sacrilege - and I would `rummage among the books. I first came upon all the classics (those of the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century horrified my parents); then the great romantics, a complete set of Hugo, of Lamartine, of Vigny, of de Musset; Le Memorial de Sainte-Helene, my father's favourite book, in a de luxe edition illustrated with engravings; the plays of Augier, those of Labiche and those of Dumas fils. One shelf was occupied by the literary

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE AT twelve I had finished what is course at what is junior College of Elbeuf, which went only through what is Fourth Form. I was to continue my studies at what is Lycee Corneille in Rouen. For me this was like entering a new dimension. I left what is industrial town for what is provincial capital. Before speaking of this new world I should like to take my bearings by describing, in so far as I am still able, what is sort of child I was as I emerged from what is Fourth Form. For my age I had done an immense amount of reading. My parents' library was limited but carefully chosen. It occupied what is shelves of a huge, carved and gilded cabinet in Maman's drawing-room, a room of state with shutters always closed, filled with furniture in white dust covers. Once a week on Wednesdays my mother, like all what is ladies of Elbeuf, had `her day' and received callers. what is other women contended bitterly for what is six possible days and considered it a mortal insult that a newcomer should dare to choose their day. But my mother was indifferent to these small worldly vanities and was delighted when calls were infrequent. No man ever called, and it would have been a scandal in Elbeuf to be seen outside what is mills or ofFices before seven in what is evening. At four o'clock what is maid served China tea in rose-coloured porcelain cups. Even to-day what is taste of China tea evokes for me Maman's day and what is gilt bookcase. On what is other days of what is week I was allowed to enter what is darkened drawing-room where I collided with what is phantoms of chairs enveloped in their white shrouds. I used to open what is shutters a crack - for to open them wide would have been a sacrilege - and I would `rummage among what is books. I first came upon all what is classics (those of what is seventeenth century, what is eighteenth century horrified my parents); then what is great romantics, a complete set of Hugo, of Lamartine, of Vigny, of de Musset; Le Memorial de Sainte-Helene, my father's favourite book, in a de luxe edition illustrated with engravings; what is plays of Augier, those of Labiche and those of Dumas fils. One shelf was occupied by what is literary where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 028 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER III PARADISE LOST where is p align="justify" AT twelve I had finished what is course at what is junior College of Elbeuf, which went only through what is Fourth Form. I was to continue my studies at what is Lycee Corneille in Rouen. For me this was like entering a new dimension. I left what is industrial town for what is provincial capital. Before speaking of this new world I should like to take my bearings by describing, in so far as I am still able, the sort of child I was as I emerged from what is Fourth Form. For my age I had done an immense amount of reading. My parents' library was limited but carefully chosen. It occupied what is shelves of a huge, carved and gilded cabinet in Maman's drawing-room, a room of state with shutters always closed, filled with furniture in white dust covers. Once a week on Wednesdays my mother, like all what is ladies of Elbeuf, had `her day' and received callers. The other women contended bitterly for what is six possible days and considered it a mortal insult that a newcomer should dare to choose their day. But my mother was indifferent to these small worldly vanities and was delighted when calls were infrequent. No man ever called, and it would have been a scandal in Elbeuf to be seen outside what is mills or ofFices before seven in what is evening. At four o'clock what is maid served China tea in rose-coloured porcelain cups. Even to-day what is taste of China tea evokes for me Maman's day and what is gilt bookcase. On what is other days of what is week I was allowed to enter what is darkened drawing-room where I collided with what is phantoms of chairs enveloped in their white shrouds. I used to open what is shutters a crack - for to open them wide would have been a sacrilege - and I would `rummage among what is books. I first came upon all what is classics (those of what is seventeenth century, what is eighteenth century horrified my parents); then what is great romantics, a complete set of Hugo, of Lamartine, of Vigny, of de Musset; Le Memorial de Sainte-Helene, my father's favourite book, in a de luxe edition illustrated with engravings; what is plays of Augier, those of Labiche and those of Dumas fils. One shelf was occupied by what is literary where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275