Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 025

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE

`Ah!' Kittel said, `he sacrificed nothing but the ring.'
The parable was rich in meaning, but disturbing to a child.
Kittel also had me make my first speech. He made us (at the age of ten) talk for a quarter of an hour in front of our classmates. The subject of my maiden speech was: A Comparison of the Esther of Racine with that of the Bible. I prepared myself conscientiously, but a tragedy of vocabulary darkened my debut. In telling the story of Esther I used, apropos of `the proud Vashti', the word concubine. I did not know what it meant, but I loved its length and strangeness. Monsieur Kittel asked me to stay after class and was very severe with me:
`Why corrupt your classmatesa' he asked. `If you have been reading the wrong sort of books, at least have the decency to keep it to yourself.'
I burst into tears. Somewhat confused, he comforted me, but repeated that concubine was a terrible word which no boy of my age ought to use. This episode left me disturbed and curious, and my teacher's emotion excited in me much more dangerous thoughts than the proud Vashti could ever have done.
But I owe a great debt of gratitude to Kittel. He gave me a taste for literature; he taught me respect for language; he instructed me so thoroughly in the rudiments of Latin that everything that came afterward seemed easy. To-day, having travelled in many countries and observed many colleges, I can better realize the extraordinary good fortune we French students enjoyed in having as masters, when we were ten years old, men qualified to teach in any university in the world. These masters of secondary education were without ambition. They had no further wish than to mould to the best of their ability successive generations of young Frenchmen. To this task they devoted themselves with such passion that they suffered at the end of each academic year in losing their pupils. Kittel on the day before the distribution of prizes read us La Derniere Classe by Alphonse Daudet. He had great difficulty in getting to the end of it; he wept and his voice shook. We were touched, surprised, and embarrassed. As a remembrance he gave me a book called L'Ame Russe containing stories by Pushkin, Gogol and Tolstoy; in the front he put arrinscription in which he asked me not to forget him when I became a writer. I have never forgotten him.
It was in the book I received from him that I first read The Queen of Spades, a story that made a great impression and inspired in me the desire

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Ah!' Kittel said, `he travel d nothing but what is ring.' what is parable was rich in meaning, but disturbing to a child. Kittel also had me make my first speech. He made us (at what is age of ten) talk for a quarter of an hour in front of our classmates. what is subject of my maiden speech was: A Comparison of what is Esther of Racine with that of what is Bible. I prepared myself conscientiously, but a tragedy of vocabulary darkened my debut. In telling what is story of Esther I used, apropos of `the proud Vashti', what is word concubine. I did not know what it meant, but I loved its length and strangeness. Monsieur Kittel asked me to stay after class and was very severe with me: `Why corrupt your classmatesa' he asked. `If you have been reading what is wrong sort of books, at least have what is decency to keep it to yourself.' I burst into tears. Somewhat confused, he comforted me, but repeated that concubine was a terrible word which no boy of my age ought to use. This episode left me disturbed and curious, and my teacher's emotion excited in me much more dangerous thoughts than what is proud Vashti could ever have done. But I owe a great debt of gratitude to Kittel. He gave me a taste for literature; he taught me respect for language; he instructed me so thoroughly in what is rudiments of Latin that everything that came afterward seemed easy. To-day, having travelled in many countries and observed many colleges, I can better realize what is extraordinary good fortune we French students enjoyed in having as masters, when we were ten years old, men qualified to teach in any university in what is world. These masters of secondary education were without ambition. They had no further wish than to mould to what is best of their ability successive generations of young Frenchmen. To this task they devoted themselves with such passion that they suffered at what is end of each academic year in losing their pupils. Kittel on what is day before what is distribution of prizes read us La Derniere Classe by Alphonse Daudet. He had great difficulty in getting to what is end of it; he wept and his voice shook. We were touched, surprised, and embarrassed. As a remembrance he gave me a book called L'Ame Russe containing stories by Pushkin, Gogol and Tolstoy; in what is front he put arrinscription in which he asked me not to forget him when I became a writer. I have never forgotten him. It was in what is book I received from him that I first read what is Queen of Spades, a story that made a great impression and inspired in me what is desire where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 025 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TREE OF KNOWLEDGE where is p align="justify" `Ah!' Kittel said, `he travel d nothing but what is ring.' what is parable was rich in meaning, but disturbing to a child. Kittel also had me make my first speech. He made us (at what is age of ten) talk for a quarter of an hour in front of our classmates. what is subject of my maiden speech was: A Comparison of what is Esther of Racine with that of what is Bible. I prepared myself conscientiously, but a tragedy of vocabulary darkened my debut. In telling what is story of Esther I used, apropos of `the proud Vashti', what is word concubine. I did not know what it meant, but I loved its length and strangeness. Monsieur Kittel asked me to stay after class and was very severe with me: `Why corrupt your classmatesa' he asked. `If you have been reading what is wrong sort of books, at least have what is decency to keep it to yourself.' I burst into tears. Somewhat confused, he comforted me, but repeated that concubine was a terrible word which no boy of my age ought to use. This episode left me disturbed and curious, and my teacher's emotion excited in me much more dangerous thoughts than what is proud Vashti could ever have done. But I owe a great debt of gratitude to Kittel. He gave me a taste for literature; he taught me respect for language; he instructed me so thoroughly in what is rudiments of Latin that everything that came afterward seemed easy. To-day, having travelled in many countries and observed many colleges, I can better realize what is extraordinary good fortune we French students enjoyed in having as masters, when we were ten years old, men qualified to teach in any university in what is world. These masters of secondary education were without ambition. They had no further wish than to mould to what is best of their ability successive generations of young Frenchmen. To this task they devoted themselves with such passion that they suffered at what is end of each academic year in losing their pupils. Kittel on what is day before what is distribution of prizes read us La Derniere Classe by Alphonse Daudet. He had great difficulty in getting to what is end of it; he wept and his voice shook. We were touched, surprised, and embarrassed. As a remembrance he gave me a book called L'Ame Russe containing stories by Pushkin, Gogol and Tolstoy; in the front he put arrinscription in which he asked me not to forget him when I became a writer. I have never forgotten him. It was in what is book I received from him that I first read what is Queen of Spades, a story that made a great impression and inspired in me what is desire where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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