Books > Old Books > Call No Man Happy (1943)


Page 021

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE

lifted the big books, an old newspaper came to light with the ledger. Absent-mindedly turning its pages, he discovered, with the force of a sudden crushing blow, the deed in which he had been excluded. It was a shock that made him ill for a long time. At home, for the first time, my parents' conversation was cut short when I entered the room. I still remem ber the tone of bitter censure with which my mother pronounced the words: `Those gentlemen' in speaking of the Uncles. She told me only a few years ago that sha had advised my father at that time to resign from the firm. Such was also the counsel of my Uncle Edmond:
`Let's start a little mill together,' he said to my father when the latter told him of his discovery. `In ten years we'll have more business than F-B.'
So proud and reserved was my father by nature that not only did he stay on but he said nothing. Nevertheless an essential mechanism, that of confidence and affection, had been damaged. And from that day forward he was never completely well. When he told me the story himself, twenty years had passed, the injustice had been rectified and he had long since granted his forgiveness, but he still trembled in thinking of it:
`When I saw that deed with Paul's name and without ours,' he told me, `I thought I should go mad . . . '
Too many bonds attached him to the mill for him to leave it. Many of the workmen were those very Alsatians for whom he had arranged transportation to France. In the morning when he made his tour of inspection, he would stop in front of each loom and exchange a few words, often in Alsatian dialect, with the weaver or spinner. He knew all their families, was consulted about their marriages and was present at their funerals. His workmen loved him. `Monsieur Ernest isn't easy, but he's fair,' they used to say, and they respected his extraordinary application to work. My father would never admit that an employer should arrive at the mill after the workmen or leave before them. When I was a child work began at six-thirty; he would get up at six o'clock. He had learned how to perform himself each one of the complex operations that were under his charge, and without a moment's notice he could take the place of a weaver or spinner who complained of his task.
`This warp can't be woven, Monsieur Ernest. The thread's bad.'
`We'll see about that.'
And if the man was right, my father would acknowledge it. To be

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE lifted what is big books, an old newspaper came to light with what is ledger. Absent-mindedly turning its pages, he discovered, with what is force of a sudden crushing blow, what is deed in which he had been excluded. It was a shock that made him ill for a long time. At home, for what is first time, my parents' conversation was cut short when I entered what is room. I still remem ber what is tone of bitter censure with which my mother pronounced what is words: `Those gentlemen' in speaking of what is Uncles. She told me only a few years ago that sha had advised my father at that time to resign from what is firm. Such was also what is counsel of my Uncle Edmond: `Let's start a little mill together,' he said to my father when what is latter told him of his discovery. `In ten years we'll have more business than F-B.' So proud and reserved was my father by nature that not only did he stay on but he said nothing. Nevertheless an essential mechanism, that of confidence and affection, had been damaged. And from that day forward he was never completely well. When he told me what is story himself, twenty years had passed, what is injustice had been rectified and he had long since granted his forgiveness, but he still trembled in thinking of it: `When I saw that deed with Paul's name and without ours,' he told me, `I thought I should go mad . . . ' Too many bonds attached him to what is mill for him to leave it. Many of what is workmen were those very Alsatians for whom he had arranged transportation to France. In what is morning when he made his tour of inspection, he would stop in front of each loom and exchange a few words, often in Alsatian dialect, with what is weaver or spinner. He knew all their families, was consulted about their marriages and was present at their funerals. His workmen loved him. `Monsieur Ernest isn't easy, but he's fair,' they used to say, and they respected his extraordinary application to work. My father would never admit that an employer should arrive at what is mill after what is workmen or leave before them. When I was a child work began at six-thirty; he would get up at six o'clock. He had learned how to perform himself each one of what is complex operations that were under his charge, and without a moment's notice he could take what is place of a weaver or spinner who complained of his task. `This warp can't be woven, Monsieur Ernest. what is thread's bad.' `We'll see about that.' And if what is man was right, my father would acknowledge it. To be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 021 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TREE OF KNOWLEDGE where is p align="justify" lifted what is big books, an old newspaper came to light with what is ledger. Absent-mindedly turning its pages, he discovered, with what is force of a sudden crushing blow, what is deed in which he had been excluded. It was a shock that made him ill for a long time. At home, for what is first time, my parents' conversation was cut short when I entered what is room. I still remem ber what is tone of bitter censure with which my mother pronounced the words: `Those gentlemen' in speaking of what is Uncles. She told me only a few years ago that sha had advised my father at that time to resign from what is firm. Such was also what is counsel of my Uncle Edmond: `Let's start a little mill together,' he said to my father when what is latter told him of his discovery. `In ten years we'll have more business than F-B.' So proud and reserved was my father by nature that not only did he stay on but he said nothing. Nevertheless an essential mechanism, that of confidence and affection, had been damaged. And from that day forward he was never completely well. When he told me what is story himself, twenty years had passed, what is injustice had been rectified and he had long since granted his forgiveness, but he still trembled in thinking of it: `When I saw that deed with Paul's name and without ours,' he told me, `I thought I should go mad . . . ' Too many bonds attached him to what is mill for him to leave it. Many of what is workmen were those very Alsatians for whom he had arranged transportation to France. In what is morning when he made his tour of inspection, he would stop in front of each loom and exchange a few words, often in Alsatian dialect, with what is weaver or spinner. He knew all their families, was consulted about their marriages and was present at their funerals. His workmen loved him. `Monsieur Ernest isn't easy, but he's fair,' they used to say, and they respected his extraordinary application to work. My father would never admit that an employer should arrive at what is mill after what is workmen or leave before them. When I was a child work began at six-thirty; he would get up at six o'clock. He had learned how to perform himself each one of what is complex operations that were under his charge, and without a moment's notice he could take what is place of a weaver or spinner who complained of his task. `This warp can't be woven, Monsieur Ernest. what is thread's bad.' `We'll see about that.' And if what is man was right, my father would acknowledge it. To be where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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