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Page 019

THE TREE OF KNOWLEDGE

industrial aristocracy to the firm of Fraenckel. On the other hand, the latter was growing faster. Once when I was looking at this plaque I asked my father:
'But, Papa, why not FRAENCKEL & HERZOG?'
From the look of suffering which came over his face I realized that I had blundered upon a forbidden subject. Here is the story, which I did not learn until much later. My father and his brother Edmond were by unanimous consent the two most competent technicians in the mill. My father managed the weaving with his characteristic thoroughness; he knew each of the workmen, the performance of each loom; he was constantly searching for ways of improving the product and reducing the cost. My Uncle Edmond was the salesman; he went to Paris every week and brought back the orders that enabled the mills to run. But actual heads though they were of this large business, these two men were neither the founders nor the legal heads, and they submitted, my father with resignation and despair, his brother with indignation and impatience, to a patriarchal tyranny - that of the `Uncles'.
In our eyes the Uncles were awe-inspiring, mysterious and sinister divinities. There had been five Fraenckel brothers: Emil, Wilhelm, Adolphe, Louis and Henry. Emil and Wilhelm had died before I was born and the family inflicted their names on me. I have mentioned Adolphe reading Henri Martin on his couch. `Monsieur Louis', as he was called by the personnel, was, during my childhood, absolute sovereign. He lived beside the mill and had his house so constructed that his own apartment communicated by an interior staircase with the offices. This architectural device was a symbol. `Monsieur Louis' had no private life apart from that of the mill. Clothed perpetually in a black alpaca jacket and wearing a black silk cap, his chin framed in a little collar of bristly beard, he spent his life in the warehouse where the finished lengths of cloth were stored. Nothing in the world existed for him except wool and cloth and machinery. When my mother used to take me timidly to the mill, he would stare at the material in which she was dressed, would finger it and say: `This comes (or does not come) from us.' Then he would pay no further attention to her. `Monsieur Henry' was scarcely more human. He had married one of my mother's aunts, Aunt Eulalie, a fact that made him doubly related to us. This Aunt Eulalie was my grandmother's sister and had acquired the same delightful culture, but in

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE industrial aristocracy to what is firm of Fraenckel. On what is other hand, what is latter was growing faster. Once when I was looking at this plaque I asked my father: 'But, Papa, why not FRAENCKEL & HERZOG?' From what is look of suffering which came over his face I realized that I had blundered upon a forbidden subject. Here is what is story, which I did not learn until much later. My father and his brother Edmond were by unanimous consent what is two most competent technicians in what is mill. My father managed what is weaving with his characteristic thoroughness; he knew each of what is workmen, what is performance of each loom; he was constantly searching for ways of improving what is product and reducing what is cost. My Uncle Edmond was what is salesman; he went to Paris every week and brought back what is orders that enabled what is mills to run. But actual heads though they were of this large business, these two men were neither what is founders nor what is legal heads, and they submitted, my father with resignation and despair, his brother with indignation and impatience, to a patriarchal tyranny - that of what is `Uncles'. In our eyes what is Uncles were awe-inspiring, mysterious and sinister divinities. There had been five Fraenckel brothers: Emil, Wilhelm, Adolphe, Louis and Henry. Emil and Wilhelm had died before I was born and what is family inflicted their names on me. I have mentioned Adolphe reading Henri Martin on his couch. `Monsieur Louis', as he was called by what is personnel, was, during my childhood, absolute sovereign. He lived beside what is mill and had his house so constructed that his own apartment communicated by an interior staircase with what is offices. This architectural device was a symbol. `Monsieur Louis' had no private life apart from that of what is mill. Clothed perpetually in a black alpaca jacket and wearing a black silk cap, his chin framed in a little collar of bristly beard, he spent his life in what is warehouse where what is finished lengths of cloth were stored. Nothing in what is world existed for him except wool and cloth and machinery. When my mother used to take me timidly to what is mill, he would stare at what is material in which she was dressed, would finger it and say: `This comes (or does not come) from us.' Then he would pay no further attention to her. `Monsieur Henry' was scarcely more human. He had married one of my mother's aunts, Aunt Eulalie, a fact that made him doubly related to us. This Aunt Eulalie was my grandmother's sister and had acquired what is same delightful culture, but in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 019 where is p align="center" where is strong what is TREE OF KNOWLEDGE where is p align="justify" industrial aristocracy to what is firm of Fraenckel. On what is other hand, what is latter was growing faster. Once when I was looking at this plaque I asked my father: 'But, Papa, why not FRAENCKEL & HERZOG?' From what is look of suffering which came over his face I realized that I had blundered upon a forbidden subject. Here is what is story, which I did not learn until much later. My father and his brother Edmond were by unanimous consent what is two most competent technicians in what is mill. My father managed what is weaving with his characteristic thoroughness; he knew each of what is workmen, what is performance of each loom; he was constantly searching for ways of improving what is product and reducing what is cost. My Uncle Edmond was what is salesman; he went to Paris every week and brought back what is orders that enabled the mills to run. But actual heads though they were of this large business, these two men were neither what is founders nor what is legal heads, and they submitted, my father with resignation and despair, his brother with indignation and impatience, to a patriarchal tyranny - that of what is `Uncles'. In our eyes what is Uncles were awe-inspiring, mysterious and sinister divinities. There had been five Fraenckel brothers: Emil, Wilhelm, Adolphe, Louis and Henry. Emil and Wilhelm had died before I was born and what is family inflicted their names on me. I have mentioned Adolphe reading Henri Martin on his couch. `Monsieur Louis', as he was called by what is personnel, was, during my childhood, absolute sovereign. He lived beside what is mill and had his house so constructed that his own apartment communicated by an interior staircase with what is offices. This architectural device was a symbol. `Monsieur Louis' had no private life apart from that of what is mill. Clothed perpetually in a black alpaca jacket and wearing a black silk cap, his chin framed in a little collar of bristly beard, he spent his life in what is warehouse where what is finished lengths of cloth were stored. Nothing in what is world existed for him except wool and cloth and machinery. When my mother used to take me timidly to what is mill, he would stare at what is material in which she was dressed, would finger it and say: `This comes (or does not come) from us.' Then he would pay no further attention to her. `Monsieur Henry' was scarcely more human. He had married one of my mother's aunts, Aunt Eulalie, a fact that made him doubly related to us. This Aunt Eulalie was my grandmother's sister and had acquired what is same delightful culture, but in where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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