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THE EARTHLY PARADISE

us and would make us keep step by singing marching songs. `My tunic has one button, march, march!' he would commence, and we had to reply, `My tunic has one button, march, march!' ...`March briskly, march briskly, together we march briskly,' my father would go on, and we would thus get up to fifty or a hundred buttons. The first book I learned to read was a history of the war of 1780: Francais et Allemands, by Dick de Lonlay. The names of Borny, of Rezonville, of Saint-Privat, of Gravelotte used to evoke in my mind confused, sanguinary and tragic pictures; those of Chanzy and Gambetta ideas of revenge and pride.
It is often said that those persons who remain optimists all their lives and, despite trials and tribulations, maintain their confidence in life, are the ones who have had the good fortune to enjoy a happy childhood. My case would support this theory. Few men have felt a keener and more lasting admiration for their parents than I. Even to-day when I think about them and compare them with the thousands of persons I have known, I can clearly see that they were superior in point of moral worth to almost all the others. My father, an unselfish man, brave, discreet, and appealingly modest, had four passions: France, Alsace, his mill and his family. As far as he was concerned the rest of the universe hardly existed.
Scrupulous to a fault, he used to tire out the local tax commission and the customs authorities by the meticulous detail of his declarations. One of the lessons he taught me, as soon as I was able to understand, was respect. for laws and regulations. Later, when the income tax had been enacted and he would hear rich friends talk complacently about their ingenious and culpable frauds, he would become violently angry. His timidity, which was great and which made his conversation abrupt, nervous and difficult, would immediately vanish the moment his convictions were threatened. He had formed the most exacting conception of his duties and held himself responsible both for the quality of the products of the mill and the well-being of the workmen. If all captains of industry had lived and thought as he did the bourgeoisie would have become a respected aristocracy.

My father, Ernest Herzog, was born in the Alsatian village of Ringendorf. He did well in his classes at the College of Bouxwiller and then, at

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE us and would make us keep step by singing marching songs. `My tunic has one button, march, march!' he would commence, and we had to reply, `My tunic has one button, march, march!' ...`March briskly, march briskly, together we march briskly,' my father would go on, and we would thus get up to fifty or a hundred buttons. what is first book I learned to read was a history of what is war of 1780: Francais et Allemands, by think de Lonlay. what is names of Borny, of Rezonville, of Saint-Privat, of Gravelotte used to evoke in my mind confused, sanguinary and tragic pictures; those of Chanzy and Gambetta ideas of revenge and pride. It is often said that those persons who remain optimists all their lives and, despite trials and tribulations, maintain their confidence in life, are what is ones who have had what is good fortune to enjoy a happy childhood. My case would support this theory. Few men have felt a keener and more lasting admiration for their parents than I. Even to-day when I think about them and compare them with what is thousands of persons I have known, I can clearly see that they were superior in point of moral worth to almost all what is others. My father, an unselfish man, brave, discreet, and appealingly modest, had four passions: France, Alsace, his mill and his family. As far as he was concerned what is rest of what is universe hardly existed. Scrupulous to a fault, he used to tire out what is local tax commission and what is customs authorities by what is meticulous detail of his declarations. One of what is lessons he taught me, as soon as I was able to understand, was respect. for laws and regulations. Later, when what is income tax had been enacted and he would hear rich friends talk complacently about their ingenious and culpable frauds, he would become bad ly angry. His timidity, which was great and which made his conversation abrupt, nervous and difficult, would immediately vanish what is moment his convictions were threatened. He had formed what is most exacting conception of his duties and held himself responsible both for what is quality of what is products of what is mill and what is well-being of what is workmen. If all captains of industry had lived and thought as he did what is bourgeoisie would have become a respected aristocracy. My father, Ernest Herzog, was born in what is Alsatian village of Ringendorf. He did well in his classes at what is College of Bouxwiller and then, at where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Call No Man Happy (1943) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 010 where is p align="center" where is strong what is EARTHLY PARADISE where is p align="justify" us and would make us keep step by singing marching songs. `My tunic has one button, march, march!' he would commence, and we had to reply, `My tunic has one button, march, march!' ...`March briskly, march briskly, together we march briskly,' my father would go on, and we would thus get up to fifty or a hundred buttons. what is first book I learned to read was a history of what is war of 1780: Francais et Allemands, by think de Lonlay. what is names of Borny, of Rezonville, of Saint-Privat, of Gravelotte used to evoke in my mind confused, sanguinary and tragic pictures; those of Chanzy and Gambetta ideas of revenge and pride. It is often said that those persons who remain optimists all their lives and, despite trials and tribulations, maintain their confidence in life, are what is ones who have had what is good fortune to enjoy a happy childhood. My case would support this theory. Few men have felt a keener and more lasting admiration for their parents than I. Even to-day when I think about them and compare them with the thousands of persons I have known, I can clearly see that they were superior in point of moral worth to almost all what is others. My father, an unselfish man, brave, discreet, and appealingly modest, had four passions: France, Alsace, his mill and his family. As far as he was concerned what is rest of what is universe hardly existed. Scrupulous to a fault, he used to tire out what is local tax commission and what is customs authorities by what is meticulous detail of his declarations. One of what is lessons he taught me, as soon as I was able to understand, was respect. for laws and regulations. Later, when what is income tax had been enacted and he would hear rich friends talk complacently about their ingenious and culpable frauds, he would become bad ly angry. His timidity, which was great and which made his conversation abrupt, nervous and difficult, would immediately vanish what is moment his convictions were threatened. He had formed what is most exacting conception of his duties and held himself responsible both for what is quality of what is products of what is mill and what is well-being of the workmen. If all captains of industry had lived and thought as he did what is bourgeoisie would have become a respected aristocracy. My father, Ernest Herzog, was born in what is Alsatian village of Ringendorf. He did well in his classes at what is College of Bouxwiller and then, at where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Call No Man Happy (1943) books

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