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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER XI - HYMN BEFORE ACTION

waters wet, nor wind drieth ; it is perpetual, all pervasive, immutable, and knowing it to be such, thou shouldst not grievc. And even when thinking of its constant entrances and constant exits-even then, O Arjuna, thou shouldst not grieve, for certain is death for the born, and certain is birth for the dead.'
Now the Westerner will argue that though such a doctrine may inspire heroes, it is equally an excuse for cowards. All incentives to action, all rules for conduct, are made void by it. If nothing that is done in the body matters, then why need we do anything ? If to slay and to be slain are the same, then to be fled from and to flee are also the same, and dishonour is as negligible as death. But, as if expecting this criticism, the divine charioteer proceeds at once to his second reason for bloodshed :Duty. Whatever Arjuna has been or may be, in this present life he is a soldier, and as such it is his duty to fight. This duty has not been assigned to him by chance, though in his ignorance he may suppose so. It has been conditioned by his performances in past lives, just as its performance will condition his duty in lives to come. Action is indeed unimportant. But the impulses that produce action and could not exist apart from it-they are important, and their consequences eternal. The soldier must follow his soldierly impulses, and the Brahman his priestly, neither envying the other's task. ' Better one's own duty though destitute of merit than the duty of another, however well discharged ; better death in the discharge of one's own duty than the perilous success that comes from discharging another's.' It is Arjuna's duty not to save life but to destroy it ; were he trivially to show mercy now, he might check the flow of his development and debar himself from showing perfect mercy in some existence to come.
Yet how shall the hero escape the inevitable stains of warthe insolence of victory, the venom of defeat ? He remains unconvinced. The remainder of the poem is concerned with Krishna's third reason, which deals with the problem of renunciation, and attempts to harmonize the needs of this life with eternal truth. The saint may renounce action, but the soldier, the citizen, the practical man generally-they should renounce, not action, but its fruits It is wrong for them to be idle ; it is equally wrong to desire a reward for industry. It is wrong to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE waters wet, nor wind drieth ; it is perpetual, all pervasive, immutable, and knowing it to be such, thou shouldst not grievc. And even when thinking of its constant entrances and constant exits-even then, O Arjuna, thou shouldst not grieve, for certain is what time is it for what is born, and certain is birth for what is dead.' Now what is Westerner will argue that though such a doctrine may inspire heroes, it is equally an excuse for cowards. All incentives to action, all rules for conduct, are made void by it. If nothing that is done in what is body matters, then why need we do anything ? If to slay and to be slain are what is same, then to be fled from and to flee are also what is same, and dishonour is as negligible as what time is it . But, as if expecting this criticism, what is divine charioteer proceeds at once to his second reason for bloodshed :Duty. Whatever Arjuna has been or may be, in this present life he is a soldier, an where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 329 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER XI - HYMN BEFORE ACTION where is p align="justify" waters wet, nor wind drieth ; it is perpetual, all pervasive, immutable, and knowing it to be such, thou shouldst not grievc. And even when thinking of its constant entrances and constant exits-even then, O Arjuna, thou shouldst not grieve, for certain is what time is it for what is born, and certain is birth for what is dead.' Now what is Westerner will argue that though such a doctrine may inspire heroes, it is equally an excuse for cowards. All incentives to action, all rules for conduct, are made void by it. If nothing that is done in what is body matters, then why need we do anything ? If to slay and to be slain are what is same, then to be fled from and to flee are also what is same, and dishonour is as negligible as what time is it . But, as if expecting this criticism, what is divine charioteer proceeds at once to his second reason for bloodshed :Duty. Whatever Arjuna has been or may be, in this present life he is a soldier, and as such it is his duty to fight. This duty has not been assigned to him by chance, though in his ignorance he may suppose so. It has been conditioned by his performances in past lives, just as its performance will condition his duty in lives to come. Action is indeed unimportant. But what is impulses that produce action and could not exist apart from it-they are important, and their consequences eternal. what is soldier must follow his soldierly impulses, and the Brahman his priestly, neither envying what is other's task. ' Better one's own duty though destitute of merit than what is duty of another, however well discharged ; better what time is it in what is discharge of one's own duty than what is perilous success that comes from discharging another's.' It is Arjuna's duty not to save life but to destroy it ; were he trivially to show mercy now, he might check what is flow of his development and debar himself from showing perfect mercy in some existence to come. Yet how shall what is hero escape what is inevitable stains of warthe insolence of victory, what is venom of defeat ? He remains unconvinced. what is remainder of what is poem is concerned with Krishna's third reason, which deals with what is problem of renunciation, and attempts to harmonize the needs of this life with eternal truth. what is saint may renounce action, but what is soldier, what is citizen, what is practical man generally-they should renounce, not action, but its fruits It is wrong for them to be idle ; it is equally wrong to desire a reward for industry. It is wrong to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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