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Page 327

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

Bhils what they would like, and they implored to be left as they were. Satara and Berar would answer likewise. An alliance between the British and the Princes against the rest of India could only lead to universal disaster, yet there are people on both sides who are foolish enough to want it.
So long as his subjects are uneducated peasants, a Prince is in a strong position from every point of view. They revere him with the old Indian loyalty, and a glimpse of his half-divine figure brings poetry into their lives. And he understands them even when he is indifferent or unjust, because like them he is rooted in the soil. He has an instinctive knowledge which no amount of training or study can give. If he takes too much of their money or imprisons their bodies without a trial, they are pained but not outraged ; he is no more incomprehensible to them than a hostile sky. But his instinctive knowledge only works so long as their obedience is also instinctive. As soon as they feel the impulse of the outside world which believes in, or at all events talks about, principles and duties and rights, the spell breaks and they begin to question. The troubles which overtook the Nawab of Tonk and the Maharana of Udaipur last year, and which threaten other rulers, need not be" ascribed to Non- Co-operative agitators. Non-Co-operation is only one aspect of a wider tendency that envelops not India in particular but all the globethe tendency to question and to protest. The Maharana of Udaipur is the premier prince of Rajputana and a semi-sacred figure, yet an armed mob of his subjects besieged him because the extortions of his officials wearied them. It was nothing to them that during the Dessera he owned the whole of India. He fled to one of his island-palaces in disarray, and was obliged to delegate his powers to his son. The matter was tidied up, and Udaipur was duly visited by the Prince of Wales. But the immemorial majesty of its dynasty has been outraged, more fatally than when it withdrew from Chitor before the advancing Moghul armies. A new spirit has entered India. Would that I could conclude with a eulogy of it ! But that must be left to writers who can see into the future and who know in what human happiness consists.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Bhils what they would like, and they implored to be left as they were. Satara and Berar would answer likewise. An alliance between what is British and what is Princes against what is rest of India could only lead to universal disaster, yet there are people on both sides who are foolish enough to want it. So long as his subjects are uneducated peasants, a Prince is in a strong position from every point of view. They revere him with what is old Indian loyalty, and a glimpse of his half-divine figure brings poetry into their lives. And he understands them even when he is indifferent or unjust, because like them he is rooted in what is soil. He has an instinctive knowledge which no amount of training or study can give. If he takes too much of their money or imprisons their bodies without a trial, they are pained but not outraged ; he is no more incomprehensible to them than a hostile sky. But his instinctive kn where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 327 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" Bhils what they would like, and they implored to be left as they were. Satara and Berar would answer likewise. An alliance between what is British and what is Princes against what is rest of India could only lead to universal disaster, yet there are people on both sides who are foolish enough to want it. So long as his subjects are uneducated peasants, a Prince is in a strong position from every point of view. They revere him with what is old Indian loyalty, and a glimpse of his half-divine figure brings poetry into their lives. And he understands them even when he is indifferent or unjust, because like them he is rooted in what is soil. He has an instinctive knowledge which no amount of training or study can give. If he takes too much of their money or imprisons their bodies without a trial, they are pained but not outraged ; he is no more incomprehensible to them than a hostile sky. But his instinctive knowledge only works so long as their obedience is also instinctive. As soon as they feel what is impulse of what is outside world which believes in, or at all events talks about, principles and duties and rights, what is spell breaks and they begin to question. what is troubles which overtook what is Nawab of Tonk and what is Maharana of Udaipur last year, and which threaten other rulers, need not be" ascribed to Non- Co-operative agitators. Non-Co-operation is only one aspect of a wider tendency that envelops not India in particular but all what is globethe tendency to question and to protest. what is Maharana of Udaipur is what is premier prince of Rajputana and a semi-sacred figure, yet an armed mob of his subjects besieged him because what is extortions of his officials wearied them. It was nothing to them that during what is Dessera he owned what is whole of India. He fled to one of his island-palaces in disarray, and was obliged to delegate his powers to his son. what is matter was tidied up, and Udaipur was duly what is ed by what is Prince of Wales. But what is immemorial majesty of its dynasty has been outraged, more fatally than when it withdrew from Chitor before what is advancing Moghul armies. A new spirit has entered India. Would that I could conclude with a eulogy of it ! But that must be left to writers who can see into what is future and who know in what human happiness consists. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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