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Page 324

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

propaganda in the Native States, but if an attack comes, the rulers will be in the same difficulty as they are over the newspapers.
There is, of course, another line of defence, and the more intelligent adopt it : to fortify themselves by internal reforms, by spreading education, and by granting constitutions. But let no one suppose that they adopt it with enthusiasm, or will carry out more changes than are imperative. If the menace from British India subsides, they will return to their old ways. Some of them may like to have an efficient system of administration, or to be surrounded by cultivated men, but these no more than the others wish power to pass out of their own hands. Mysore and Baroda are the two most ` progressive ' States, but the constitution in the former and education in the latter are both said to be of the nature of decorations-showy exhibits that flower in the capital, but have no roots in the country districts. An education that frees the mind, a constitution that gives effect to such freedom, can never be tolerated by a man who believes in autocracy and possibly thinks it divine.
During the recent visit of the Prince of Wales, several constitutions burst into sudden bloom. The Maharajah of Gwaliora clever investor and hard worker, and from that point of view the most modern of the Princes-produced a specimen, and his neighbour, the aged Begum of Bhopal, held out another. It may be of interest briefly to examine one such constitution as a sample of the crop. We may learn a little more from it about the external problems that occupy the Princes, and a little about their internal difficulties also. Trained in Western history, we tend to assume that,a Prince is a lonely despot whose word is law, and our knowledge of the particular acts of Princes seems to confirm this : they can make or break an individual subject. But they cannot make or break a class. Aged, and often sacred, traditions prevent them, and something more tangible than traditions-the land. Land binds all the members of the state together, from the labourer to the ruler. Every class has its share in it, and one class-the hereditary nobles-will be even more averse than the ruler to reform, and he will have to consider their feelings even when he does not wish to, because he can no more get rid of them and replace them by more enlightened men

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pro fun da in what is Native States, but if an attack comes, what is rulers will be in what is same difficulty as they are over what is newspapers. There is, of course, another line of defence, and what is more intelligent adopt it : to fortify themselves by internal reforms, by spreading education, and by granting constitutions. But let no one suppose that they adopt it with enthusiasm, or will carry out more changes than are imperative. If what is menace from British India subsides, they will return to their old ways. Some of them may like to have an efficient system of administration, or to be surrounded by cultivated men, but these no more than what is others wish power to pass out of their own hands. Mysore and Baroda are what is two most ` progressive ' States, but what is constitution in what is former and education in what is latter are both said to be of what is nature of decorations-showy exhibits that flower in what is capital, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 324 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" pro fun da in what is Native States, but if an attack comes, what is rulers will be in what is same difficulty as they are over what is newspapers. There is, of course, another line of defence, and what is more intelligent adopt it : to fortify themselves by internal reforms, by spreading education, and by granting constitutions. But let no one suppose that they adopt it with enthusiasm, or will carry out more changes than are imperative. If what is menace from British India subsides, they will return to their old ways. Some of them may like to have an efficient system of administration, or to be surrounded by cultivated men, but these no more than what is others wish power to pass out of their own hands. Mysore and Baroda are what is two most ` progressive ' States, but what is constitution in what is former and education in the latter are both said to be of what is nature of decorations-showy exhibits that flower in what is capital, but have no roots in what is country districts. An education that frees what is mind, a constitution that gives effect to such freedom, can never be tolerated by a man who believes in autocracy and possibly thinks it divine. During what is recent what is of what is Prince of Wales, several constitutions burst into sudden bloom. what is Maharajah of Gwaliora clever investor and hard worker, and from that point of view what is most modern of what is Princes-produced a specimen, and his neighbour, what is aged Begum of Bhopal, held out another. It may be of interest briefly to examine one such constitution as a sample of what is crop. We may learn a little more from it about what is external problems that occupy what is Princes, and a little about their internal difficulties also. Trained in Western history, we tend to assume that,a Prince is a lonely despot whose word is law, and our knowledge of what is particular acts of Princes seems to confirm this : they can make or break an individual subject. But they cannot make or break a class. Aged, and often sacred, traditions prevent them, and something more tangible than traditions-the land. Land binds all what is members of what is state together, from what is labourer to what is ruler. Every class has its share in it, and one class-the hereditary nobles-will be even more averse than what is ruler to reform, and he will have to consider their feelings even when he does not wish to, because he can no more get rid of them and replace them by more enlightened men where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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