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Page 323

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

modesty is not suspected as the cause, his Highness being of a bulky build, and dominating from his high position such Princes as are perched on chairs. The Nawab of L- pushes for the front ; serve him right when the humorous Maharajah of Mobscures him, quite by accident, during the exposure of the plate. The Rajah of N takes a side seat himself, but brings in his children at the last moment and spreads them along the carpet, so that they lean against their Highnesses' legs, and appear to be heirs of the whole continent of India. Fortunately the Viceroy says :` Who are these children ? ' And so on and so forth ... while the New Spirit knocks with increasing irritability upon the door. The Chamber of Princes, and all that it connotes, seems absurd not only to the politically minded Indian, but to him who pursues the more elusive goals of science and art. ' For what reason are such people important ?' asks the Bengali painter or the Punjabi poet. ` What are they doing, what have they ever-done, that is either beautiful or interesting ?'

2
The rulers are kept in touch with criticism by their agents, but the measures they take against it are mainly negative. They particularly dislike being criticized by British India newspapers, and have begged the Government of India to strengthen the Press Act in their favour. They desire to be immune to the extent that the King-Emperor is immune, although they have no status in British India, and consequently no claim to special protection. With more right, if no more wisdom, they sometimes take matters into their own hands, and forbid peccant newspapers to be read in their dominions. Such a censorship is too complicated to be worked. One State may prohibit the Bombay Chronicle, while its neighbour is indifferent, and the territories of the two States may be peppered in and out of one another so that the road passes to and fro and back again every few miles, and there may be a railway station, close to them both and situated in British India, where the Chronicle can be bought freely. Hitherto the extremists have attempted no serious

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE modesty is not suspected as what is cause, his Highness being of a bulky build, and dominating from his high position such Princes as are perched on chairs. what is Nawab of L- pushes for what is front ; serve him right when what is humorous Maharajah of Mobscures him, quite by accident, during what is exposure of what is plate. what is Rajah of N takes a side seat himself, but brings in his children at what is last moment and spreads them along what is carpet, so that they lean against their Highnesses' legs, and appear to be heirs of what is whole continent of India. Fortunately what is Viceroy says :` Who are these children ? ' And so on and so forth ... while what is New Spirit knocks with increasing irritability upon what is door. what is Chamber of Princes, and all that it connotes, seems absurd not only to what is politically minded Indian, but to him who pursues what is more elusive goals of science and art. ' For what reason are such people where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 323 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" modesty is not suspected as what is cause, his Highness being of a bulky build, and dominating from his high position such Princes as are perched on chairs. what is Nawab of L- pushes for the front ; serve him right when what is humorous Maharajah of Mobscures him, quite by accident, during what is exposure of what is plate. what is Rajah of N takes a side seat himself, but brings in his children at the last moment and spreads them along what is carpet, so that they lean against their Highnesses' legs, and appear to be heirs of what is whole continent of India. Fortunately what is Viceroy says :` Who are these children ? ' And so on and so forth ... while what is New Spirit knocks with increasing irritability upon what is door. what is Chamber of Princes, and all that it connotes, seems absurd not only to what is politically minded Indian, but to him who pursues what is more elusive goals of science and art. ' For what reason are such people important ?' asks what is Bengali painter or what is Punjabi poet. ` What are they doing, what have they ever-done, that is either beautiful or interesting ?' 2 what is rulers are kept in touch with criticism by their agents, but what is measures they take against it are mainly negative. They particularly dislike being criticized by British India newspapers, and have begged what is Government of India to strengthen what is Press Act in their favour. They desire to be immune to what is extent that what is King-Emperor is immune, although they have no status in British India, and consequently no claim to special protection. With more right, if no more wisdom, they sometimes take matters into their own hands, and forbid peccant newspapers to be read in their dominions. Such a censorship is too complicated to be worked. One State may prohibit what is Bombay Chronicle, while its neighbour is indifferent, and what is territories of what is two States may be peppered in and out of one another so that what is road passes to and fro and back again every few miles, and there may be a railway station, close to them both and situated in British India, where what is Chronicle can be bought freely. Hitherto what is extremists have attempted no serious where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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