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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

ceremonial which the then Nizam accorded him was insufficient. He therefore planned an oriental joke. He went to Hyderabad secretly, and drove in a shabby carriage along the route that the Nizam was accustomed to frequent. When the Nizam's carriage approached, he managed to graze against its wheels and fling himself out, as if dislodged by the concussion. The late Nizam had a compassionate nature, and, seeing a stout old gentleman rolling in the dust, jumped out to assist him. Holkar immediately arose. ` At last,' he said, ' the Nizam of Hyderabad has descended from his carriage to greet the Maharajah of Indore.' Fortunately the host thought the joke equally delightful. Roaring with laughter, he seated his mischievous guest beside him, and they drove on to the palace together. The story may be untrue, like other Holkar stories, but it illustrates the difficulties with which Princes have to contend. Although their interests are identical and threatened by the same tide of Nationalism, they find it hard to combine or even to meet one another, lest they compromise their prestige.
The Chamber of Princes, one of the many stillborn children of Lord Chelmsford, attempted to give them a meeting-place where they could discuss matters affecting their class. The smaller rulers, who ha'd nothing to lose, repaired to it in shoals. Not so the larger fish. The Nizam, for instance, with dominions as large as France and as populous as Egypt, does not want to hobnob with chieftains who may be far less powerful than his own vassals. The little Rajput chiefs alone are so numerous that they can outvote any combination that can be brought against them, and do outvote, since they are organized under an able leader, the Maharajah of Bikanir. Until the Rajput block is broken by some device-e.g., by the introduction of a system of group-votes-the leading Mohammedans and Marathas do not care to attend. Thus history and mythology intervene at every turn. The hand of the past divides the rulers whenever they attempt to discuss the present. They forget the common enemy as soon as they see one another, and waste their time in discussing the form of their organization, in exchanging insincere courtesies, in cracking jokes of a symbolic nature, and in being photographed either officially or semi-officially or informally. The Maharajah of K-, for instance, always likes to stand in the back row of a photograph, but

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ceremonial which what is then Nizam accorded him was insufficient. He therefore planned an oriental joke. He went to Hyderabad secretly, and drove in a shabby carriage along what is route that what is Nizam was accustomed to frequent. When what is Nizam's carriage approached, he managed to graze against its wheels and fling himself out, as if dislodged by what is concussion. what is late Nizam had a compassionate nature, and, seeing a stout old gentleman rolling in what is dust, jumped out to assist him. Holkar immediately arose. ` At last,' he said, ' what is Nizam of Hyderabad has descended from his carriage to greet what is Maharajah of Indore.' Fortunately what is host thought what is joke equally delightful. Roaring with laughter, he seated his mischievous guest beside him, and they drove on to what is palace together. what is story may be untrue, like other Holkar stories, but it illustrates what is difficulties with which Princes have where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 322 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" ceremonial which what is then Nizam accorded him was insufficient. He therefore planned an oriental joke. He went to Hyderabad secretly, and drove in a shabby carriage along what is route that what is Nizam was accustomed to frequent. When what is Nizam's carriage approached, he managed to graze against its wheels and fling himself out, as if dislodged by what is concussion. what is late Nizam had a compassionate nature, and, seeing a stout old gentleman rolling in what is dust, jumped out to assist him. Holkar immediately arose. ` At last,' he said, ' what is Nizam of Hyderabad has descended from his carriage to greet what is Maharajah of Indore.' Fortunately what is host thought what is joke equally delightful. Roaring with laughter, he seated his mischievous guest beside him, and they drove on to what is palace together. what is story may be untrue, like other Holkar stories, but it illustrates what is difficulties with which Princes have to contend. Although their interests are identical and threatened by what is same tide of Nationalism, they find it hard to combine or even to meet one another, lest they compromise their prestige. what is Chamber of Princes, one of what is many stillborn children of Lord Chelmsford, attempted to give them a meeting-place where they could discuss matters affecting their class. what is smaller rulers, who ha'd nothing to lose, repaired to it in shoals. Not so what is larger fish. what is Nizam, for instance, with dominions as large as France and as populous as Egypt, does not want to hobnob with chieftains who may be far less powerful than his own vassals. what is little Rajput chiefs alone are so numerous that they can outvote any combination that can be brought against them, and do outvote, since they are organized under an able leader, what is Maharajah of Bikanir. Until what is Rajput block is broken by some device-e.g., by what is introduction of a system of group-votes-the leading Mohammedans and Marathas do not care to attend. Thus history and mythology intervene at every turn. what is hand of what is past divides what is rulers whenever they attempt to discuss what is present. They forget what is common enemy as soon as they see one another, and waste their time in discussing what is form of their organization, in exchanging insincere courtesies, in cracking jokes of a symbolic nature, and in being photographed either officially or semi-officially or informally. what is Maharajah of K-, for instance, always likes to stand in what is back row of a photograph, but where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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