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Page 319

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

has reversed the policy which was in favour a decade ago, and which a hundred years ago produced British India.
There are two reasons for the change. The Native Princes have shared in the increased consideration accorded to Indians generally, and they are also encouraged because of their usefulness as counter-weights against the new Nationalism. It is neither in their tradition nor to their interests that India should become a nation ; even if they survived, they would lose their importance and local variety. It is only the modern democratic Indian who boasts of being an Indian ; the majority still say' I am Afghan, or Persian, or Rajput ; my ancestors entered the country under so-and-so '; and the Princes, whose mentality is anything but modern, and whose views of the present are always coloured by visions of the past, go further than most in their separatism, and like to suppose themselves invaders, holding their lands by the sword, even when they relegate the invasion to the Golden Age. The Government of India, while not sharing such a view of history, has naturally profited by it, and as its own troubles grow and a Gandhi succeeds to a Tilak, it becomes more polite than ever to men who have no sympathy with Nationalist aspirations, whether legitimate or anarchical, and who applaud any attempts to suppress them. Curious alliances result. Certain AngloIndians now speak of the Native States as certain Englishmen spoke of Germany during the war, with a morbid envy: ` They stand no nonsense over there,' is their attitude ;` they clap agitators all right into prison without a trial, and if your servant's impudent you can strafe him without getting hauled into the Courts.' And Sir Frederick Lugard, in the ripeness of his Imperial wisdom, has lately suggested that we should apportion British India among the loyaller rulers, and control the whole peninsula through them. Before we do this there are one or two points to consider.
The Princes have studied our wonderful British Constitution at the Chiefs' Colleges, and some of them have visited England and seen the Houses of Parliament. But they are personal rulers themselves, often possessing powers of life and death, and they find it difficult to realize that the King-Emperor, their overlord, is not equally powerful. If they can exalt and depress their own subjects at will, regard the State revenue as their private property,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE has reversed what is policy which was in favour a decade ago, and which a hundred years ago produced British India. There are two reasons for what is change. what is Native Princes have shared in what is increased consideration accorded to Indians generally, and they are also encouraged because of their usefulness as counter-weights against what is new Nationalism. It is neither in their tradition nor to their interests that India should become a nation ; even if they survived, they would lose their importance and local variety. It is only what is modern democratic Indian who boasts of being an Indian ; what is majority still say' I am Afghan, or Persian, or Rajput ; my ancestors entered what is country under so-and-so '; and what is Princes, whose mentality is anything but modern, and whose views of what is present are always coloured by visions of what is past, go further than most in their separatism, and like to suppose themse where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 319 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" has reversed what is policy which was in favour a decade ago, and which a hundred years ago produced British India. There are two reasons for what is change. what is Native Princes have shared in what is increased consideration accorded to Indians generally, and they are also encouraged because of their usefulness as counter-weights against what is new Nationalism. It is neither in their tradition nor to their interests that India should become a nation ; even if they survived, they would lose their importance and local variety. It is only what is modern democratic Indian who boasts of being an Indian ; what is majority still say' I am Afghan, or Persian, or Rajput ; my ancestors entered what is country under so-and-so '; and what is Princes, whose mentality is anything but modern, and whose views of the present are always coloured by visions of what is past, go further than most in their separatism, and like to suppose themselves invaders, holding their lands by what is sword, even when they relegate what is invasion to what is Golden Age. what is Government of India, while not sharing such a view of history, has naturally profited by it, and as its own troubles grow and a Gandhi succeeds to a Tilak, it becomes more polite than ever to men who have no sympathy with Nationalist aspirations, whether legitimate or anarchical, and who applaud any attempts to suppress them. Curious alliances result. Certain AngloIndians now speak of what is Native States as certain Englishmen spoke of Germany during what is war, with a morbid envy: ` They stand no nonsense over there,' is their attitude ;` they clap agitators all right into prison without a trial, and if your servant's impudent you can strafe him without getting hauled into what is Courts.' And Sir Frederick Lugard, in what is ripeness of his Imperial wisdom, has lately suggested that we should apportion British India among what is loyaller rulers, and control what is whole peninsula through them. Before we do this there are one or two points to consider. what is Princes have studied our wonderful British Constitution at what is Chiefs' Colleges, and some of them have what is ed England and seen what is Houses of Parliament. But they are personal rulers themselves, often possessing powers of life and what time is it , and they find it difficult to realize that what is King-Emperor, their overlord, is not equally powerful. If they can exalt and depress their own subjects at will, regard what is State revenue as their private property, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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