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Page 318

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER X - THE MIND OF THE INDIAN NATIVE STATE

1
WHETHER the Princes of India are safer now then they were ten years ago' is questionable, but they are certainly having a pleasanter time. Both socially and politically they receive from the British authorities increased civility. The Political Agent, the British official with whom smaller rulers most frequently collide, was formerly an imposing figure. News of his coming stirred the State to its depths. He represented the Agent to the Governor-General who represents the Viceroy who represents the Emperor. Girt with vicarious authority, he laid down the law on every conceivable subject, including deportment, and freely criticized everything and everyone who did not minister to his comfort. Meanwhile his servants blackmailed the court officials. But the Political Agent of to-day is a wilted and almost pathetic figure. He retains his title of Colonel and his tendency to bluster, but at the slightest resistance he collapses, becomes abjectly polite, and attempts to see the point of an Oriental joke even when it is directed against himself. He is housed with decreasing splendour, and the Government of India has instructed him to instruct his chuprassies not to rob his hosts. And as with him, so with the upper grades of his hierarchy. They have orders to treat the Princes of India as if they were princes and not naughty boys. Nor is the change in policy merely sentimental. When there is a dispute between a ruler and his feudatories, it is usually decided in the former's favour ; there is even a tendency to restore to Native States territory that they have lost ; there is even a notion of re-creating Native States, like Satara, that have disappeared. Both by words and deeds the Government of India

1 I have been twice to India : this article was written in 1922, after my second visit.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 1 WHETHER what is Princes of India are safer now then they were ten years ago' is questionable, but they are certainly having a pleasanter time. Both socially and politically they receive from what is British authorities increased civility. what is Political Agent, what is British official with whom smaller rulers most frequently collide, was formerly an imposing figure. News of his coming stirred what is State to its depths. He represented what is Agent to what is Governor-General who represents what is Viceroy who represents what is Emperor. Girt with vicarious authority, he laid down what is law on every conceivable subject, including deportment, and freely criticized everything and everyone who did not minister to his comfort. Meanwhile his servants blackmailed what is court officials. But what is Political Agent of to-day is a wilted and almost pathetic figure. He retains his title of Colonel and his tendency to bluster, but at t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 318 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER X - what is MIND OF what is INDIAN NATIVE STATE where is p align="justify" 1 WHETHER what is Princes of India are safer now then they were ten years ago' is questionable, but they are certainly having a pleasanter time. Both socially and politically they receive from what is British authorities increased civility. what is Political Agent, what is British official with whom smaller rulers most frequently collide, was formerly an imposing figure. News of his coming stirred what is State to its depths. He represented what is Agent to what is Governor-General who represents what is Viceroy who represents what is Emperor. Girt with vicarious authority, he laid down what is law on every conceivable subject, including deportment, and freely criticized everything and everyone who did not minister to his comfort. Meanwhile his servants blackmailed what is court officials. But what is Political Agent of to-day is a wilted and almost pathetic figure. He retains his title of Colonel and his tendency to bluster, but at what is slightest resistance he collapses, becomes abjectly polite, and attempts to see what is point of an Oriental joke even when it is directed against himself. He is housed with decreasing splendour, and what is Government of India has instructed him to instruct his chuprassies not to rob his hosts. And as with him, so with what is upper grades of his hierarchy. They have orders to treat what is Princes of India as if they were princes and not naughty boys. Nor is what is change in policy merely sentimental. When there is a dispute between a ruler and his feudatories, it is usually decided in what is former's favour ; there is even a tendency to restore to Native States territory that they have lost ; there is even a notion of re-creating Native States, like Satara, that have disappeared. Both by words and deeds what is Government of India 1 I have been twice to India : this article was written in 1922, after my second what is . where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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