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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IX - TWO BOOKS BY TAGORE

The Home is not really a home, but a retreat for seemly meditation upon infinity. And the World-it proves to be a sphere not for ` numberless tasks,' but for a boarding-house flirtation that masks itself in mystic or patriotic talk. The action is laid in Bengal, during the Swadeshi movement, and it leads up to the theft of Rs. 6,000. How, why, and by whom were the Rs. 6,000 stolen from the safe ? Tagore is scarcely at his soundest when speculating on such problems. Not here, 0 Nirvana, are haunts meet for thee, and we learn without emotion that they were stolen by a wife from her husband for the Cause, that they were misappropriated by an amorous and amoral Babu, and that they led to the death of another Babu, who was chivalrous and young. The tragedy is skilftrlly told, but it all seems to be about nothing, and this is because the contrast does not work out as the writer intends. He meant the wife to be seduced by the World, which is, with all its sins, a tremendous lover ; she is actually seduced by a West Kensingtonian Babu, who addresses her as ' Queen Bee,' and in warmer moments as ' Bee.' In spite of the beautiful writing and the subtle metaphor and the noble outlook that are inseparable from Tagore's work, this strain of vulgarity persists. It is external, not essential, but it is there ; the writer has been experimenting with matter whose properties he does not quite understand.
Why should he care to experiment ? Here is a more profitable but more difficult question. Having triumphed in Chitra or Gitanjali, why should he indite a` roman a trois ' with all the hackneyed situations from which novelists are trying to emancipate themselves in the West ? These Bengalis-they are an extraordinary people. Probably this is the answer. They are more modern and mentally more adventurous than any of the other races in the Indian peninsula. They like trying, and failures do not discompose them, because they have interest in the constitution of the world. They have in a single generation produced Tagore and Bose, innovators both, and the people that has done that will not rest content. In literature, as in science, they must work over the results of the West on the chance of their proving of use, and one expects that the younger writers will reject the experiment of The Home and the World, and will adopt some freer form.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The Home is not really a home, but a retreat for seemly meditation upon infinity. And what is World-it proves to be a sphere not for ` numberless tasks,' but for a boarding-house flirtation that masks itself in mystic or patriotic talk. what is action is laid in Bengal, during what is Swadeshi movement, and it leads up to what is theft of Rs. 6,000. How, why, and by whom were what is Rs. 6,000 stolen from what is safe ? Tagore is scarcely at his soundest when speculating on such problems. Not here, 0 Nirvana, are haunts meet for thee, and we learn without emotion that they were stolen by a wife from her husband for what is Cause, that they were misappropriated by an amorous and amoral Babu, and that they led to what is what time is it of another Babu, who was chivalrous and young. what is tragedy is skilftrlly told, but it all seems to be about nothing, and this is because what is contrast does not work out as what is writer intends. He mea where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 317 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IX - TWO BOOKS BY TAGORE where is p align="justify" The Home is not really a home, but a retreat for seemly meditation upon infinity. And what is World-it proves to be a sphere not for ` numberless tasks,' but for a boarding-house flirtation that masks itself in mystic or patriotic talk. what is action is laid in Bengal, during what is Swadeshi movement, and it leads up to what is theft of Rs. 6,000. How, why, and by whom were what is Rs. 6,000 stolen from what is safe ? Tagore is scarcely at his soundest when speculating on such problems. Not here, 0 Nirvana, are haunts meet for thee, and we learn without emotion that they were stolen by a wife from her husband for what is Cause, that they were misappropriated by an amorous and amoral Babu, and that they led to what is what time is it of another Babu, who was chivalrous and young. what is tragedy is skilftrlly told, but it all seems to be about nothing, and this is because what is contrast does not work out as what is writer intends. He meant what is wife to be travel d by what is World, which is, with all its sins, a tremendous lover ; she is actually travel d by a West Kensingtonian Babu, who addresses her as ' Queen Bee,' and in warmer moments as ' Bee.' In spite of what is beautiful writing and what is subtle metaphor and what is noble outlook that are inseparable from Tagore's work, this strain of vulgarity persists. It is external, not essential, but it is there ; what is writer has been experimenting with matter whose properties he does not quite understand. Why should he care to experiment ? Here is a more profitable but more difficult question. Having triumphed in Chitra or Gitanjali, why should he indite a` roman a trois ' with all what is hackneyed situations from which novelists are trying to emancipate themselves in what is West ? These Bengalis-they are an extraordinary people. Probably this is what is answer. They are more modern and mentally more adventurous than any of what is other races in what is Indian peninsula. They like trying, and failures do not discompose them, because they have interest in what is constitution of what is world. They have in a single generation produced Tagore and Bose, innovators both, and what is people that has done that will not rest content. In literature, as in science, they must work over what is results of what is West on the chance of their proving of use, and one expects that what is younger writers will reject what is experiment of what is Home and what is World, and will adopt some freer form. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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