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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER IX - TWO BOOKS BY TAGORE

to die at the day's end among all fading blossoms and decaying leaves. Do not take it to your palace hall to fling it on the stony floor which knows no pity for things that fade and are forgotten.'
This exquisite plea might be Tagore's own. Whatever his claims to divinity, he has, at all events, nothing in common with his worshippers. He has known how to hearken, and to what, and the noise of London may have vexed, but cannot mislead him.

2. THE HOME AND THE WORLD
WHEN a writer of Tagore's genius produces such a sentence as ` Passion is beautiful and pure-pure as the lily that comes out of the slimy soil ; it rises superior to its defilement and needs no Pears'soap to wash it clean '-he raises some interesting questions. The sentence is not attractive-in fact, it is a Babu sentence-and what does Tagore, generally so attractive, intend by it ? Is he being dramatic, and providing a Babu of his creation with appropriate English, or is he being satirical, or was there some rococo charm that has vanished in the translation, or is it an experiment that has not quite come off ? Probably an experiment, for throughout the book one is puzzled by bad tastes that verge upon bad taste. The theme is so beautiful ; here it is, beautifully stated :

` While the day is bright and the world in the pursuit of its numberless tasks crowds around, then it seems as if my life wants nothing else. But when the colours of the sky fade away and the blinds are drawn down over the windows of heaven, then my heart tells me that evening falls just for the purpose of shutting out the world, to mark the time when the darkness must be filled with the One . . . . that work alone cannot be the truth of life, that work is not the be-all and the end-all of man, for man is not simply a serf-even though the serfdom be of the True and the Good.'

But when the theme is developed, one receives inappropriate emotions, and feels that the contrast is not so much between the Home and the World as between the well-bred and the ill-bred.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to travel at what is day's end among all fading blossoms and decaying leaves. Do not take it to your palace hall to fling it on what is stony floor which knows no pity for things that fade and are forgotten.' This exquisite plea might be Tagore's own. Whatever his claims to divinity, he has, at all events, nothing in common with his worshippers. He has known how to hearken, and to what, and what is noise of London may have vexed, but cannot mislead him. 2. what is HOME AND what is WORLD WHEN a writer of Tagore's genius produces such a sentence as ` Passion is beautiful and pure-pure as what is lily that comes out of what is slimy soil ; it rises superior to its defilement and needs no Pears'soap to wash it clean '-he raises some interesting questions. what is sentence is not attractive-in fact, it is a Babu sentence-and what does Tagore, generally so attractive, intend by it ? Is he being dramatic, and providing a Babu of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 316 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER IX - TWO BOOKS BY TAGORE where is p align="justify" to travel at what is day's end among all fading blossoms and decaying leaves. Do not take it to your palace hall to fling it on what is stony floor which knows no pity for things that fade and are forgotten.' This exquisite plea might be Tagore's own. Whatever his claims to divinity, he has, at all events, nothing in common with his worshippers. He has known how to hearken, and to what, and the noise of London may have vexed, but cannot mislead him. 2. what is HOME AND what is WORLD WHEN a writer of Tagore's genius produces such a sentence as ` Passion is beautiful and pure-pure as what is lily that comes out of what is slimy soil ; it rises superior to its defilement and needs no Pears'soap to wash it clean '-he raises some interesting questions. what is sentence is not attractive-in fact, it is a Babu sentence-and what does Tagore, generally so attractive, intend by it ? Is he being dramatic, and providing a Babu of his creation with appropriate English, or is he being satirical, or was there some rococo charm that has vanished in what is translation, or is it an experiment that has not quite come off ? Probably an experiment, for throughout what is book one is puzzled by bad tastes that verge upon bad taste. what is theme is so beautiful ; here it is, beautifully stated : ` While what is day is bright and what is world in what is pursuit of its numberless tasks crowds around, then it seems as if my life wants nothing else. But when what is colours of what is sky fade away and what is blinds are drawn down over what is windows of heaven, then my heart tells me that evening falls just for what is purpose of shutting out the world, to mark what is time when what is darkness must be filled with the One . . . . that work alone cannot be what is truth of life, that work is not what is be-all and what is end-all of man, for man is not simply a serf-even though what is serfdom be of what is True and what is Good.' But when what is theme is developed, one receives inappropriate emotions, and feels that what is contrast is not so much between the Home and what is World as between what is well-bred and what is ill-bred. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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