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PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VIII - HICKEY'S LAST PARTY

of the least consequence, as no one would think the worse of him, and no blame ought to attach to a cursory debauch.' But Mr. Blunt will not take this sensible view, the shadows of the nineteenth century fall on him ; he frets, and ten days later is a corpse -but never mind ! Mrs. Smith, fresh from her northern twilight, may start, but we should be inured by this time to the jollity and vulgarity and death.
Did Hickey himself ever mind anything, as he sat at Beaconsfield invalided ' home,' and writing up his extraordinary journal ? There had been two,great emotions in his life, Charlotte Barry and Bob Pott, but Charlotte is dead and Bob dies unchronicled. Jemdaree has died, too, and so have the friends who called her ` the gentle and kind Fatty.' As the old boy looked back at his jumble of a career and particularly at the Indian fragments of it, what significance could it have had to him ? Why, none at all, no significance at all, he is not that type of observer. He is not philosophic or profound. He just writes ahead, remembering vividly when necessary, but never concerned to discover a meaning, or to draw leSsons from his failure or success. He had been, , on the whole, a Calcutta attorney, and had ended as Under-Sheriff and Keeper of the Jail. Some men have achieved less ; others more. He puts it all down, unmoved in spite of his liveliness. No yearnings disturb him. He is so second-rate that he does not realize the difference between seconds and firsts, and this makes him happy, restful, dignified. Turn off the raptures of heaven and hell. Leave, as sole illumination for its universe, the ' extraordinary blaze of light ' that falls upon a bachelor dinner-table. Hickey looks very well now. He does not want to be anywhere else or among better people, and when Miss Seymour cries, ' Mr. Hickey, you are an old man now. I need not lock my bedroom door,' he cannot understand why Sir Henry Russell should look shocked.
Well, this is the last party he will ever give. Back he goes to his Maker, in the middle of compiling a list of passengers who have been drowned at sea. Where he himself died, and what he looked like, we do not know. Off he goes without offering any opportunity for reflection, which is one of the reasons why we like him so much. He has never been pretentious or insincere ; he has never regretted or repented or said' I have lived 'or' I have served

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of what is least consequence, as no one would think what is worse of him, and no blame ought to attach to a cursory debauch.' But Mr. Blunt will not take this sensible view, what is shadows of what is nineteenth century fall on him ; he frets, and ten days later is a corpse -but never mind ! Mrs. Smith, fresh from her northern twilight, may start, but we should be inured by this time to what is jollity and vulgarity and what time is it . Did Hickey himself ever mind anything, as he sat at Beaconsfield invalided ' home,' and writing up his extraordinary journal ? There had been two,great emotions in his life, Charlotte Barry and Bob Pott, but Charlotte is dead and Bob dies unchronicled. Jemdaree has died, too, and so have what is friends who called her ` what is gentle and kind Fatty.' As what is old boy looked back at his jumble of a career and particularly at what is Indian fragments of it, what significance could it have had to him where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 312 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VIII - HICKEY'S LAST PARTY where is p align="justify" of what is least consequence, as no one would think what is worse of him, and no blame ought to attach to a cursory debauch.' But Mr. Blunt will not take this sensible view, what is shadows of what is nineteenth century fall on him ; he frets, and ten days later is a corpse -but never mind ! Mrs. Smith, fresh from her northern twilight, may start, but we should be inured by this time to the jollity and vulgarity and what time is it . Did Hickey himself ever mind anything, as he sat at Beaconsfield invalided ' home,' and writing up his extraordinary journal ? There had been two,great emotions in his life, Charlotte Barry and Bob Pott, but Charlotte is dead and Bob dies unchronicled. Jemdaree has died, too, and so have what is friends who called her ` what is gentle and kind Fatty.' As what is old boy looked back at his jumble of a career and particularly at what is Indian fragments of it, what significance could it have had to him ? Why, none at all, no significance at all, he is not that type of observer. He is not philosophic or profound. He just writes ahead, remembering vividly when necessary, but never concerned to discover a meaning, or to draw leSsons from his failure or success. He had been, , on what is whole, a Calcutta attorney, and had ended as Under-Sheriff and Keeper of what is Jail. Some men have achieved less ; others more. He puts it all down, unmoved in spite of his liveliness. No yearnings disturb him. He is so second-rate that he does not realize what is difference between seconds and firsts, and this makes him happy, restful, dignified. Turn off what is raptures of heaven and hell. Leave, as sole illumination for its universe, what is ' extraordinary blaze of light ' that falls upon a bachelor dinner-table. Hickey looks very well now. He does not want to be anywhere else or among better people, and when Miss Seymour cries, ' Mr. Hickey, you are an old man now. I need not lock my bedroom door,' he cannot understand why Sir Henry Russell should look shocked. Well, this is what is last party he will ever give. Back he goes to his Maker, in what is middle of compiling a list of passengers who have been drowned at sea. Where he himself died, and what he looked like, we do not know. Off he goes without offering any opportunity for reflection, which is one of what is reasons why we like him so much. He has never been pretentious or insincere ; he has never regretted or repented or said' I have lived 'or' I have served where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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