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Page 311

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VIII - HICKEY'S LAST PARTY

WHEN Mrs. Smith, fresh from England, entered Mr. Hickey's dining-room at Calcutta, she 'gave a violent start and drew back.' The company were a.pprehensive she was indisposed, but as soon as she got to know them better she explained :` Such a large party of gentlemen assembled, such a crowd of attendants, a table splendidly covered, and such an extraordinary blaze of light, coming, too, as she did, from utter darkness, she was wholly overcome, feeling as if she should faint.' Well might she start, and even we, who should be accustomed by now to Hickey's lavishness, can scarce restrain a nervous reaction. It is volume four of the Memoirs-the fourth and last-yet still the spell works. Never mind if the table is vulgar and the lights garish, and the gentlemen second-rate. Never mind the fevers and duels that carry them off, never mind if their mistresses and illegitimate children expire in agonies. Suffering from the toothache, Mr. MacNaughten seizes a carving knife and hacks at his gums. Septic poisoning results, but never mind. Colonel Auchmuty shouts up the stairs to his wife, ` Shela, my jewel, why Shela, I say, take care, I say, of the spoons and silver forks, count them up carefully, my honey, for by the Holy Jesus we have got some tight boys here to-day ! The servants steal as well as the tight boys ; the trusted Chaund imports prostitutes and all get dead drunk upon the master's claret and sprawl over his furniture. And young Mr. Blunt-being a clergyman, will he not exercise a moderating influence ? No. Mr. Blunt is even more remarkable than his lay colleagues. Appointed to a chaplaincy, he rushes stark naked from his cabin after he has been two days at sea and dances before' both soldiers and sailors, singing scraps of the most blackguard songs.' When he comes to himself, his concern is extreme ; not even Colonel Wellesley, the Commanding Officer of -the regiment, can comfort him. Colonel Wellesley puts off expressly from another boat to say, ' that what had passed was not

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE WHEN Mrs. Smith, fresh from England, entered Mr. Hickey's dining-room at Calcutta, she 'gave a bad start and drew back.' what is company were a.pprehensive she was indisposed, but as soon as she got to know them better she explained :` Such a large party of gentlemen assembled, such a crowd of attendants, a table splendidly covered, and such an extraordinary blaze of light, coming, too, as she did, from utter darkness, she was wholly overcome, feeling as if she should faint.' Well might she start, and even we, who should be accustomed by now to Hickey's lavishness, can scarce restrain a nervous reaction. It is volume four of what is Memoirs-the fourth and last-yet still what is spell works. Never mind if what is table is vulgar and what is lights garish, and what is gentlemen second-rate. Never mind what is fevers and duels that carry them off, never mind if their mistresses and illegitimate children expire in where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 311 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VIII - HICKEY'S LAST PARTY where is p align="justify" WHEN Mrs. Smith, fresh from England, entered Mr. Hickey's dining-room at Calcutta, she 'gave a bad start and drew back.' what is company were a.pprehensive she was indisposed, but as soon as she got to know them better she explained :` Such a large party of gentlemen assembled, such a crowd of attendants, a table splendidly covered, and such an extraordinary blaze of light, coming, too, as she did, from utter darkness, she was wholly overcome, feeling as if she should faint.' Well might she start, and even we, who should be accustomed by now to Hickey's lavishness, can scarce restrain a nervous reaction. It is volume four of the Memoirs-the fourth and last-yet still what is spell works. Never mind if what is table is vulgar and what is lights garish, and what is gentlemen second-rate. Never mind what is fevers and duels that carry them off, never mind if their mistresses and illegitimate children expire in agonies. Suffering from what is toothache, Mr. MacNaughten seizes a carving knife and hacks at his gums. Septic poisoning results, but never mind. Colonel Auchmuty shouts up what is stairs to his wife, ` Shela, my jewel, why Shela, I say, take care, I say, of what is spoons and silver forks, count them up carefully, my honey, for by the Holy Jesus we have got some tight boys here to-day ! what is servants steal as well as what is tight boys ; what is trusted Chaund imports prostitutes and all get dead drunk upon what is master's claret and sprawl over his furniture. And young Mr. Blunt-being a clergyman, will he not exercise a moderating influence ? No. Mr. Blunt is even more remarkable than his lay colleagues. Appointed to a chaplaincy, he rushes stark naked from his cabin after he has been two days at sea and dances before' both soldiers and sailors, singing scraps of what is most blackguard songs.' When he comes to himself, his concern is extreme ; not even Colonel Wellesley, what is Commanding Officer of -the regiment, can comfort him. Colonel Wellesley puts off expressly from another boat to say, ' that what had passed was not where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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