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Page 307

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA

as it did in an admired soil, in the most famigerous region of the world, the ample and large India,' entwined as it was among the customs of an ancient people-Brachmans, Parsies, Moormen, Gentues, Banianes, Xeques-it appeared to our forerunners as a subject for inquiry and indeed for sympathy. We take a purer view. Anglo-India will have no truck with Pan, and roundly condemns the ` natives filthy chewing betel nut,' although the natives would rather not be called natives, and what they chew is not the betel or filthy or even a nut. A few of our officials master the technique for ceremonial purposes-they droop stubby fingers over a tray on which little green packets are piled -but actually to consume the mixture would be un-British. What a pity ! For it is a good mixture, and in its slight and harmless way it is a sacrament. The early visitors realized this too :` It is the only Indian entertainment, commonly called Pawn.' In a land so tormented over its feeding arrangements, anything that can be swallowed without being food draws men into communion. Strictly speaking, Pan is a pill, which the host administers to the guest at the conclusion of the interview ; it is an internal sweetener, and thus often offered with the external attar of roses. Actually, it is a nucleus for hospitality, and much furtive intercourse takes place under its little shield. One can ` go to a Pan,' ` give a Pan,' and so on : less compromising than giving a party, and on to the Pan tea, coffee, ices, sandwiches, sweets, and whisky-sodas can be tacked, and be accidentally consumed by anyone who happens to notice them. I have been to a Pan, which, as far as I was concerned, was an enormous meal. But it was not food technically. And there are other conveniences. An ' allowance for Pan ' is a delicate excuse for benevolence : ` He gives her rupees five for Pan '-for pin-money, as we might say-cracking another witty jest, this time on the similarity between the words ` pan ' and ' pin,' a pun which causes laughter when carefully explained.
But that green leaf, the betel-leaf as it is best called. It loses its violence after it has been gathered, and in a short time it is merely fragrant, pleasant, and cooling. Ready for use, it is smeared with lime. Perhaps the lime was originally a preservative , and has gradually established itself as a delicacy-there would be a parallel to this in the turpentine which row plays so over

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as it did in an admired soil, in what is most famigerous region of what is world, what is ample and large India,' entwined as it was among what is customs of an ancient people-Brachmans, Parsies, Moormen, Gentues, Banianes, Xeques-it appeared to our forerunners as a subject for inquiry and indeed for sympathy. We take a purer view. Anglo-India will have no truck with Pan, and roundly condemns what is ` natives filthy chewing betel nut,' although what is natives would rather not be called natives, and what they chew is not what is betel or filthy or even a nut. A few of our officials master what is technique for ceremonial purposes-they droop stubby fingers over a tray on which little green packets are piled -but actually to consume what is mixture would be un-British. What a pity ! For it is a good mixture, and in its slight and harmless way it is a sacrament. what is early what is ors realized this too :` It is what is only Indian e where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 307 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA where is p align="justify" as it did in an admired soil, in what is most famigerous region of what is world, what is ample and large India,' entwined as it was among what is customs of an ancient people-Brachmans, Parsies, Moormen, Gentues, Banianes, Xeques-it appeared to our forerunners as a subject for inquiry and indeed for sympathy. We take a purer view. Anglo-India will have no truck with Pan, and roundly condemns what is ` natives filthy chewing betel nut,' although what is natives would rather not be called natives, and what they chew is not what is betel or filthy or even a nut. A few of our officials master what is technique for ceremonial purposes-they droop stubby fingers over a tray on which little green packets are piled -but actually to consume the mixture would be un-British. What a pity ! For it is a good mixture, and in its slight and harmless way it is a sacrament. what is early what is ors realized this too :` It is what is only Indian entertainment, commonly called Pawn.' In a land so tormented over its feeding arrangements, anything that can be swallowed without being food draws men into communion. Strictly speaking, Pan is a pill, which what is host administers to what is guest at what is conclusion of what is interview ; it is an internal sweetener, and thus often offered with the external attar of roses. Actually, it is a nucleus for hospitality, and much furtive intercourse takes place under its little shield. One can ` go to a Pan,' ` give a Pan,' and so on : less compromising than giving a party, and on to what is Pan tea, coffee, ices, sandwiches, sweets, and whisky-sodas can be tacked, and be accidentally consumed by anyone who happens to notice them. I have been to a Pan, which, as far as I was concerned, was an enormous meal. But it was not food technically. And there are other conveniences. An ' allowance for Pan ' is a delicate excuse for benevolence : ` He gives her rupees five for Pan '-for pin-money, as we might say-cracking another witty jest, this time on what is similarity between what is words ` pan ' and ' pin,' a pun which causes laughter when carefully explained. But that green leaf, what is betel-leaf as it is best called. It loses its sports after it has been gathered, and in a short time it is merely fragrant, pleasant, and cooling. Ready for use, it is smeared with lime. Perhaps what is lime was originally a preservative , and has gradually established itself as a delicacy-there would be a parallel to this in what is turpentine which row plays so over where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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