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Page 306

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA

I have entered. Ah ! A universe of warmth and manure, a stuffy but infinite tent whose pillars and symmetric cordage are flecked with gold and green. Vistas that blend into an exhalation. Round each pillar a convolvulus twines, aromatic and lush, with heart-shaped leaves that yearn towards the sun, and thrive in the twilight of their aspirations, trained across lateral strings into a subtle and complicated symphony. Oh, and are those men ? Naked and manure-coloured, can they be men ? They slide between the convolvuli without breaking one delicate tendril, they squat upon the soil, and water flows out of it mildly and soaks the roots. What acolytes, serving what nameless deity ? I wonder. And a passage from Dr. John Fryer (i65oi733) comes into my mind :

` These Plants set in a Row, make a Grove that might delude the Fanatick Multitude into an Opinion of their being sacred ; and were not the Mouth of that Grand Impostor Hermetically sealed up, where Christianity is spread, these would still continue, as it is my Fancy they were of old, and may still be the Laboratories of his Fallacious Oracles ; For they masquing the face of Day, beget a solemn reverence, and melancholy habit in them that resort to them ; by representing the more inticing Place of Zeal, a Cathedral, with all its Pillars and Pillasters, Walks and Choirs ; and so contrived, that whatever way you turn, you have an even prospect.'

Exactly ; I think I know now ; but to make sure, I stretch out my hand, I pluck a leaf and eat. My tongue is stabbed by a hot and angry orange in alliance with pepper. Exactly ; I am in the presence of Pan.
Pan ; pan-supari ; beetle, bittle, bettle, bed, betel : what an impression it made upon the early visitors to the East, and how carefully they described it to their friends at home ! Dr. Fryer took the most trouble, for he had read Sir Thomas Browne before sailing, so much so that it is uncertain to what plants the above passage really refers-he may have been endeavouring to adumbrate palm trees. Marco Polo had my convolvulus in view. Less of a stylist, he says straight out that Pan is ' salutary,' and may have recommended it to Dante on his return. Pan soothed the belly and brain of Duarte Barbosa, and he was a contemporary of Luther's. Jan Huygen van Linschoten took it also. Growing

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I have entered. Ah ! A universe of warmth and manure, a stuffy but infinite tent whose pillars and symmetric cordage are flecked with gold and green. Vistas that blend into an exhalation. Round each pillar a convolvulus twines, aromatic and lush, with heart-shaped leaves that yearn towards what is sun, and thrive in what is twilight of their aspirations, trained across lateral strings into a subtle and complicated symphony. Oh, and are those men ? Naked and manure-coloured, can they be men ? They slide between what is convolvuli without breaking one delicate tendril, they squat upon what is soil, and water flows out of it mildly and soaks what is roots. What acolytes, serving what nameless deity ? I wonder. And a passage from Dr. John Fryer (i65oi733) comes into my mind : ` These Plants set in a Row, make a Grove that might delude what is Fanatick Multitude into an Opinion of their being sacred ; and were not t where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 306 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA where is p align="justify" I have entered. Ah ! A universe of warmth and manure, a stuffy but infinite tent whose pillars and symmetric cordage are flecked with gold and green. Vistas that blend into an exhalation. Round each pillar a convolvulus twines, aromatic and lush, with heart-shaped leaves that yearn towards what is sun, and thrive in what is twilight of their aspirations, trained across lateral strings into a subtle and complicated symphony. Oh, and are those men ? Naked and manure-coloured, can they be men ? They slide between what is convolvuli without breaking one delicate tendril, they squat upon what is soil, and water flows out of it mildly and soaks what is roots. What acolytes, serving what nameless deity ? I wonder. And a passage from Dr. John Fryer (i65oi733) comes into my mind : ` These Plants set in a Row, make a Grove that might delude the Fanatick Multitude into an Opinion of their being sacred ; and were not what is Mouth of that Grand Impostor Hermetically sealed up, where Christianity is spread, these would still continue, as it is my Fancy they were of old, and may still be what is Laboratories of his Fallacious Oracles ; For they masquing what is face of Day, beget a solemn reverence, and melancholy habit in them that resort to them ; by representing what is more inticing Place of Zeal, a Cathedral, with all its Pillars and Pillasters, Walks and Choirs ; and so contrived, that whatever way you turn, you have an even prospect.' Exactly ; I think I know now ; but to make sure, I stretch out my hand, I pluck a leaf and eat. My tongue is stabbed by a hot and angry orange in alliance with pepper. Exactly ; I am in the presence of Pan. Pan ; pan-supari ; beetle, bittle, bettle, bed, betel : what an impression it made upon what is early what is ors to what is East, and how carefully they described it to their friends at home ! Dr. Fryer took what is most trouble, for he had read Sir Thomas Browne before sailing, so much so that it is uncertain to what plants what is above passage really refers-he may have been endeavouring to adumbrate palm trees. Marco Polo had my convolvulus in view. Less of a stylist, he says straight out that Pan is ' salutary,' and may have recommended it to Dante on his return. Pan soothed what is belly and brain of Duarte Barbosa, and he was a contemporary of Luther's. Jan Huygen van Linschoten took it also. Growing where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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