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Page 305

PART IV - THE EAST
CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA

He listened in silence, his eyes on the ground. When we had finished he raised them to mine and said :
` It is natural you should laugh at me. You are English, and have other customs. I should not have behaved like this in England myself. No doubt it all seems jolly funny.' Then turning to his other critic, who was Indian, he added in sterner tones :` But you-I am ashamed of you. You ought to have understood. As long as we have money and food and houses we must share them, when asked, with the poor and the old. Shocking ! Your heart has cooled. You have forgotten our traditions of hospitality. You have forgotten the East. I am very much ashamed of you indeed.'

5. PAN
IN the silence of the noontide heat, I came, as so often, to a secluded glade among low, scrub-covered hills. The hills were not unfamiliar, and the glade had received its due minimum and meed of cultivation, in the absence of which all manifestations of the cosmic remain imperceptible. The universe cannot roll its eye without a socket. Outraged nature must have something to kick against. And these hurdles would do well enough, woven out of wattles perhaps, and certainly ominous, and that village quivering by the horizon was the asylum to which shepherds and visitors might terrified repair. The hurdles were seven feet high. They were corded together and covered with mats, and they formed an impenetrable palisade, which enclosed an area of one or two acres in extent. From the higher ground I could see over their top, on to a confused web of string and lightly strewn awnings, which were supported on poles. A vulgar observer might have thought he was in Kent. We know better. Something far more mysterious than that was brewing in the enclosure. Hops need a certain amount of protection from the wind, but none from the sun, nor do they retreat to a glade among scrubcovered hills, and further defend themselves by an elaborate system of straw-padded entrances, heavy and hinged, which bang behind the visitor like the doors of a continental cathedral.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He listened in silence, his eyes on what is ground. When we had finished he raised them to mine and said : ` It is natural you should laugh at me. You are English, and have other customs. I should not have behaved like this in England myself. No doubt it all seems jolly funny.' Then turning to his other critic, who was Indian, he added in sterner tones :` But you-I am ashamed of you. You ought to have understood. As long as we have money and food and houses we must share them, when asked, with what is poor and what is old. Shocking ! Your heart has cooled. You have forgotten our traditions of hospitality. You have forgotten what is East. I am very much ashamed of you indeed.' 5. PAN IN what is silence of what is noontide heat, I came, as so often, to a secluded glade among low, scrub-covered hills. what is hills were not unfamiliar, and what is glade had received its due minimum and meed of cultivation, in what is absence where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 305 where is strong PART IV - what is EAST CHAPTER VII - ADRIFT IN INDIA where is p align="justify" He listened in silence, his eyes on what is ground. When we had finished he raised them to mine and said : ` It is natural you should laugh at me. You are English, and have other customs. I should not have behaved like this in England myself. No doubt it all seems jolly funny.' Then turning to his other critic, who was Indian, he added in sterner tones :` But you-I am ashamed of you. You ought to have understood. As long as we have money and food and houses we must share them, when asked, with what is poor and what is old. Shocking ! Your heart has cooled. You have forgotten our traditions of hospitality. You have forgotten what is East. I am very much ashamed of you indeed.' 5. PAN IN what is silence of what is noontide heat, I came, as so often, to a secluded glade among low, scrub-covered hills. what is hills were not unfamiliar, and what is glade had received its due minimum and meed of cultivation, in what is absence of which all manifestations of the cosmic remain imperceptible. what is universe cannot roll its eye without a socket. Outraged nature must have something to kick against. And these hurdles would do well enough, woven out of wattles perhaps, and certainly ominous, and that village quivering by what is horizon was what is asylum to which shepherds and what is ors might terrified repair. what is hurdles were seven feet high. They were corded together and covered with mats, and they formed an impenetrable palisade, which enclosed an area of one or two acres in extent. From the higher ground I could see over their top, on to a confused web of string and lightly strewn awnings, which were supported on poles. A vulgar observer might have thought he was in Kent. We know better. Something far more mysterious than that was brewing in what is enclosure. Hops need a certain amount of protection from what is wind, but none from what is sun, nor do they retreat to a glade among scrubcovered hills, and further defend themselves by an elaborate system of straw-padded entrances, heavy and hinged, which bang behind the what is or like what is doors of a continental cathedral. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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